tips on finding shad

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by river scum, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    where and what do i look for? i want to net some this year. its been so long i dont remember the best places. is there surface signs of their presences?
     
  2. mankind

    mankind New Member

    Messages:
    1,627
    State:
    ashland ky
    wow good question we catch them at the dam but so far none has showed up:roll_eyes:
     

  3. SkiMax

    SkiMax New Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    Where ya fishing Tim??? I can give you a spot in SE Indiana that you can go out for an afternoon, in the spring/early summer, and fill as many coolers as ya got with 8-16 inchers.
     
  4. Buddrice

    Buddrice New Member

    Messages:
    4,032
    State:
    Louisiana
    I have found that if you look for some of the water birds such as Seagulls or watch for surface movement of the shad running you can usually catch several with a cast net.Also in some of the back waters around such things as docks and piers usually hold some shad.Hope any of this helps..
     
  5. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    Max, thats too far but thanks brother!

    yes Bud, that helps, thanks. seagulls haven't shown up yet here in force so no bird action.:sad2:lol waters at 55-60 what temps will they pull out of the shallow bays? old flatland res. is what im on very shallow expansive bays. ill be tossing the net around next week. i want lil guys for big crapy.:wink:
     
  6. bnewsom71

    bnewsom71 New Member

    Messages:
    537
    State:
    Mathervill
    When the water is really calm go up into the shallow sun-soaked bays and look for circles of rippling water, almost like a breeze would look like on the water. Those would be schools of smaller shad. You can use your trolling motor and to sneak up to them and cast into that circle. If ya hit that just right, you won't have to throw that net around any more! You can also find them around warm water inlets into the body of water you are fishing. Hope this helps some! Good luck with the slabs!!
     
  7. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    If you have any small feeder creeks in the lake try around them also storm drains ect anywhere a lil water runs in can be a shad magnet. Find the right spot ya cast one time and cant haul the net back in cause its full of shad lol. Or try below the dam most of the time the they stack up below them in the flows.:cool2:
     
  8. Team Hold EM Hook

    Team Hold EM Hook New Member

    Messages:
    272
    State:
    al
    Try stained water in the coves, shad are plankton feeders and usually will be in the stained waters
    From another location:
    Gizzard Shad (Dorosoma cepedianum)


    Background:
    The most abundant and commonly used bait in this region by far. They are easy to acquire, but are a demanding bait to keep lively. Named for the gizzard which helps them process the microorganisms that they feed on, they typically range from 4-14 inches as bait. Larger gizzard shad can be found (up to 2 lbs), but only the largest of striper, 40 lbs and bigger, can manage to choke one of that size down. Gizzard shad can be found nearly anywhere on any lake, but they prefer shallow, muddy water rich in the nutrients which grows their preferred food.
    Availability:
    Just about everywhere.
    Acquisition:
    Gizzards can be caught on shallow, sandy flats or shallow, turbid (stained or muddy) coves off of the main channel. Don't be afraid to look in water as shallow as 1-2 feet. Water temperature plays a large role in locating this bait. Find warmer water and you've just found bait. Key things to look for when spotting bait is the telltale *flip* that shad do on the surface and stirred-up, muddy water where feeding shad are present. Whether it is summer or winter, they can be found in these areas. Below any dam is also a good place to find an abundance of gizzards.
    Storage:
    Gizzard shad are very dirty baitfish. If your tank doesn't have sufficient filtering ability, you won't keep them for more than a couple of hours. When first placed in the bait tank, they will lose their outer coat of slime, quickly clogging any kind of filter. Use one cup of salt per 20 gallons to counter this slime loss. Filtering the slime is only half of the battle. Gizzards have what you might call a bowel problem. If your filter won't remove large amounts of fecal matter, ammonia will build to toxic levels and your bait will die. McClane's Guide to Freshwater Fishes states that, "The gizzard shad is a poor live bait because it dies quickly..." Nonetheless, it is possible to keep these baits alive for days at a time in the right tank. For shad 4-6 inches, 2 per 1 gallon of water. For 6-10 inches, 1 shad per gallon of water. For 10-14 inch shad, 1 bait per 2 gallons of water. And as the water warms over 70 degrees, reduce your numbers even more.



    Threadfin Shad (Dorosoma petenense)


    Background:
    Threadfin shad rival gizzard shad in population. In warmer southern impoundments, they most likely outnumber them. Rarely reaching a maximum length of over 7 inches, the common range is 3-6. This is a bait which schools so tightly sometimes that your cast net will come to a complete stop on a school of them. Quite often the school will blank out your depthfinder making it impossible to read the bottom. A semi-tropical species, they cannot survive water temperatures below 45 degrees. Thus, during harsh winters, massive die-offs occur in their northern ranges.
    Availability:
    As widespread as the gizzard shad, but perhaps more concentrated in certain areas at times. They will relate to deep water much more readily than the gizzard. Usually very available year-round.
    Acquisition:
    Much of the time, threadfins will school with gizzard shad. They will seek warmer water as a general rule. Coves and inlets are good areas to look. Threadfin, like gizzards, perform the shad *flip* on the surface, making them easy to spot on calm days. From late spring to early fall, below the dams during times of generation is also an excellent place. They can also be seduced by putting out lights at night. It usually takes a couple of hours, but they will show up in large numbers if the moon isn't too bright.
    Storage:
    Somewhat delicate, if taken proper care of, threadfins do very well in a tank. They can be kept at numbers of 2-4 per gallon of water. Use salt for this shad.