Tilapia?

Discussion in 'ALL OTHER FISH' started by BassCat, Oct 25, 2006.

  1. BassCat

    BassCat New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    NC
    has anyone ever fished for tilapia? there are ALOT in a lake near my house, that a power plant put in there to eat vegetation or something, really dont know why there in there, but have seen several people catching them.......My ? is what should i use for bait & how should i fish for them? i planning on going Sat.
    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  2. BassCat

    BassCat New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    NC
    also, what size line should i use? some of the one's i've seen caught looked to be 2-3 lbs, but not sure how they pull, any suggestions would help me greatly, live bait, cut bait, worms, minnows, livers?

    Thanks again,
    Mike
     

  3. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Suprised the state let them stock tilapia, they're an exotic nuisance fish most places. Tilapia are mostly vegetarian and most are taken more by accident than on purpose. Mine have all come in my cast net.
     
  4. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
  5. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    There are so many different variations of this species, but I do believe all are vegetation eaters.
    * I live in a housing community that surrounds several small ponds. The city stocks grass carps and tilapia for vegetation control...

    * Here is my trick for catching tilapia... ( FLY ROD seems to get you the best presentation )
    I have caught them on a black ant fly pulled slow and constant.

    ~ Try tossing in a bag of catfish chum.. Just about a cup will turn them on. I have done this a few times and each time they all swarm the area in a feeding frenzy gulping at the surface. I will toss in my black ant and they slurp it down...

    They are kind of lazy fighters if you ask me... But if you can get 'em on a fly rod, they can be a bunch of fun. (5 wt )
    A~
     
  6. BassCat

    BassCat New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    NC
    the guy i saw catching them was using a regular rod and reel, and was fishing with some sort of fat worm, looked like a tobacco worm to me but unsure, i dont have a fly rod, but i will try the chum, and see what happens, Thanks
    Mike
     
  7. martinman

    martinman New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    Clinton, Iowa
    Mike,

    Myself and a couple other guys in Arizona and California have been using them for flathead bait...as it is legal in that area of the state....and they work great.

    Here is how you catch them...

    Just as with bluegill, try and find an area where the current is not too strong. I don't know what it is like where you are. Anyway, just rig up like you are fishing for bluegill and go at it. (Meaning that you use a bobber, a small sinker and a small/medium sized hook.) We have been catching them in big irrigation canals around the headgates. Although I don't know how deep the water is, we have been dropping it in the water about 3 to 4 feet.

    The bait of choice has been normal nightcrawlers...about an inch section wrapped on the hook. I have personally found that once you are able to catch the first couple fish, it seems that they go into a feeding frenzy and are easy to catch thereafter. Each time I have been able to catch 15-20 of them in about a half hour.

    I hope that this helps. They work great for bait and are good to eat...if they are big enough.

    Good luck,


    Ryan
     
  8. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    MArtinman is probably correct,
    ~ It might just be the waters that I fish, becouse those Tilapia turn their noses to everything I have tried so far. And I have never caught them anywhere else that I can remember...

    ~ The chum thing is cool though... I was hoping to get some channel cats moving and feasting. Instead, it got the tilapia turned on...
    ~ If you are going to try it, please let me know if this has any effect... (For me, it took about an hour for the tilapia to start to congregate...)

    Good luck,
     
  9. wally_1951

    wally_1951 New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    mo
    when i was stationed in the navy in hawaii we used to catch talapia for bait.didnt think twice about eating them....once i retired i had the opportunity to eat some....some of the best fish i have ever ate.....didnt know what i missed out on....take and season them and deep fry them and they are really good...to be honest i would rate them as good at catfish....and thats sayin sumthin...if you havnt tried them..take the time....and try them....if i knew that they would grow and not reproduce like gills i wouldnt mind putting them in ponds......good source of fish....clean....not fishy and really tasty if you season them rite.....
     
  10. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I don't know how to catch them but I know they are a great tasting fish. We broil are grill ours and it is mmmm mmmmm Good.
     
  11. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
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    Wow, I'm really surprised that tilapia can live as far north as NC. I thought they started dying out at around 50F.

    I've only eaten store bought fillets. IMO they're a pretty neutral tasting fish without some good seasoning, but I'd say they'd have more flavor cooked on the bone.
     
  12. BassCat

    BassCat New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    NC

    the lake that they are in is a power plant lake, with a hot water discharge, where you can catch them is within seeing distance of the plant where the water is being discharged from.
     
  13. Katphish

    Katphish New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    tennessee
    You can buy them at the grocery store down the road from my house.
     
  14. rcneman

    rcneman New Member

    Messages:
    482
    State:
    TN
    i thought tilipia were related to rainbow trout?
     
  15. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    Nope! theyre actually from Africa.
     
  16. WHEELMOBILE07

    WHEELMOBILE07 New Member

    Messages:
    569
    State:
    Martinsville, Virginia
    Yummy! Tilapia!

    Wheelmobile07
     
  17. cat-chaser

    cat-chaser New Member

    Messages:
    70
    State:
    Texas
    Try using bread. Chum them with bread,dog food or cereal. Then try small bread balls less than a foot under a cork. This has worked for me before in a neighborhood pond that is full of tilapia, some 5lbs & better. I've also caught them on a small topwater grasshopper imitation (hard plastic) with bread on the hooks & allowed to just float with no additional movement.
     
  18. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Mans hot water sources,releases of exotics and the spreading of exotic vegetation have changed a lot of things.Years ago Manatees were feeding in the Savannah River and wintering over in the warm water discharges of the power plant on the river.A plant shutdown in cold weather or unusually cold winter can often wipe such things out.peewee-wiliams
     
  19. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I was interested to learn that tilipia were vegetarian fish because ive heard of them being farmed and the wal-mart near here sells them in the seafood section i allways thought they were similar to bluegill
     
  20. rebcatman

    rebcatman New Member

    Messages:
    555
    State:
    Manassas, Virginia
    When I lived in Florida, there were a couple of lakes around my area that had "nile perch" which turned out to be tilipia. I am not sure how or why they ended up in these lakes but they were fun as hell to catch on cane poles. We used to use every type of bait to catch from worms to minnows. Most of the fish never seemed to be over 3 to 4 pounds, and we could catch 'em by the dozen.