Tides which is best

Discussion in 'VIRGINIA RIVERS TALK' started by jwfish, Oct 24, 2006.

  1. jwfish

    jwfish New Member

    Messages:
    398
    State:
    columbus ohio
    Which tide is the best to fish ,a incoming high tide or a out going and how many hours before the tide change should you fish,thanks for any help jerry
     
  2. Tinboat

    Tinboat New Member

    Messages:
    207
    State:
    Jonesboro, Arkansas
    I caught more fish on the incoming tide, very few during the slack tide and a few on the outgoing tide.
     

  3. jwfish

    jwfish New Member

    Messages:
    398
    State:
    columbus ohio
    Thanks for the info Tinboat I have only fished a tidel river once and it was the james river.The fish I caught were mostly on the start of a out going tide but I beleave that was just the way the hole I was fishing was set up.I did catch a few on the incoming.
     
  4. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    I live in Richmond and fish the James 5 or 6 times a year. I am no expert for sure but do catch more Bluecats and Stripers on the outgoing. My biggest two came during incoming. Go figure. Like you said, It probably varies in the hole or structure. James has unbelievably fast moving tides both ways.
     
  5. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
  6. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    High and low tides go along with major and minor feeding periods. Check solunar schedules and you'll see. High and low pressure fronts play a part in this also.

    This works for most all species of animals. Saw a huge buck in the nieghborhood a couple weeks ago. It was at low tide/minor solunar feeding period.

    I also have been caught in storms were the barometric pressure dropped drasticly. The kingfish bite went nuts.

    When it all comes together and you've got good bait presentation, you catch good fish.
     
  7. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Current is the primary factor, whether it is outgoing or incoming tides. I catch very little for an hour or more at slack water. My favorite time is a falling tide, 1/2 out until 1/2 way back in.
     
  8. Rapp-Catter-06

    Rapp-Catter-06 New Member

    Messages:
    57
    State:
    Virginia
    It depends on where you are fishing. Current is the key factor. I haven't had any success with slack tides. I have some holes I fish on out going and some I fish on incoming they are equally productive. I have even tried fishing some structure on both incoming and outgoing and have found that some structure can produce in either tidal stage and some can not.
     
  9. savage308

    savage308 New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Victoria, Texas
    Living here in south texas along the gulf coast of mexico, I go salt water fishing frequently. My experience has been the either movement with the tide will trigger the bite. I almost never go anymore with a slack tide and I time my fishing trips to when the tide changes. Either incoming or outgoing will be effective in my opinion.

    The best time to go here is when there is a storm in the gulf that will cause a extremely high tide. That's when we hammer em the best....
    Hope this helps....
     
  10. jwfish

    jwfish New Member

    Messages:
    398
    State:
    columbus ohio
    Thanks for all your help I will use these tip when I hit the james here in a couple weeks.
     
  11. WHEELMOBILE07

    WHEELMOBILE07 New Member

    Messages:
    569
    State:
    Martinsville, Virginia
    I would think before and right after any change in the tide.

    Wheelmobile07
     
  12. jimmyk

    jimmyk New Member

    Messages:
    46
    State:
    virginia
    I've been fishing the James out of osbourne landing(near Richmond) for a few months now. I have good luck on both low and high tides. Very little luck at slack tide. The bite sometimes really turns on right after the tide turns. Good luck and happy fishing.
     
  13. TIM HAGAN

    TIM HAGAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    State:
    Walkersvil
    Well i fish the tides all the time here on the Potomac and you can catch fish both ways you just need to set up for that tide. Incoming tides I fish the down river side of what ever you maybe fishing this will put the baits scent up to the fish and draw them down to the bait. Fish the upriver side on outgoing tides for the same reason. Doing the slack water times on high tides I run the flats or the tops of the drop offs same most fish have moved up with the high waters. this is a great time for dirfting just think of it as right after a rian and the river is coming up lots of fish running the banks for food. On low tides i look for the deeper holes and do very well with bigger fish at this time to me this it mostly 1 hour before and after low tide time. Hope this helps out may not be right but has worked great for me.
     
  14. Trophy Hunter

    Trophy Hunter New Member

    Messages:
    122
    State:
    Virginia
    Tim makes a living fishing so I would put more weight on his comments. That being said I swear by the outgoing tide on the Rappahanock and Mattaponi rivers.
     
  15. jwfish

    jwfish New Member

    Messages:
    398
    State:
    columbus ohio
    I think you might be right on that out going tide ,like I said I only fished a tidel river once and most of our big fish came on a out going tide.I will have a hard time beating the 75 lb fish I got last year.
     
  16. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Ktfshn50's post on tides was a good one.

    I'm sorry to say that there is no easy one correct answer for which tide is best. Some spots fish better on an ebb tide and some on a flood tide. Pay attention to the way the current strikes a piece of structure, river bend, or hole. The head of a hole becomes the tail when the tide turns, etc. In general, creek mouths fish better on an ebb as the tide is carrying bait out. Mostly, you have to move around and try different spots at different times and see what works for you.

    It's true that in many cases moving water (in either direction) is better than slack, but that has exceptions, too. I fish the Cooper River in South Carolina and the current can be too strong to fish effectively when it's full flood or ebb. Some of my best spots produce themost fish during an hour either side of slack water. With the lighter current, it appears that the fish come out of hiding and move around more., plus it;'s much easier to keep a bait int he strike zone.
     
  17. slimepig

    slimepig New Member

    Messages:
    666
    State:
    Kerrville Texas
    i prefer incoming tide, but when i get the hankerin ta go fishin, it doesnt matter what the tide is, unless its a really low tide then i turn around n go home. the most important thing about tides is the fluctuation of water height. look for days where the higher than average tide is forcasted.