Throw nets whats best

Discussion in 'Misc Fishing Tackle Talk' started by cc870088, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. cc870088

    cc870088 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    missouri
    looking to catch shad whats a good net for lakes throwing it from my boat? any pointers would help thanks
     
  2. RIVER-RAT

    RIVER-RAT New Member

    Messages:
    3,128
    State:
    MO / MT
    Go to Wal-Mart and purchase the "easy throw" cast net...it is the easiest throw net to use...i've tried all the others and i just couldn't get em to work until i used the "easy throw". it is a 5 foot radius and works well on the river or on the lakes
     

  3. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Check your local laws, then go to Wal-marts.
     
  4. Wyocatman

    Wyocatman New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Centralia, Illinois
    In my experience the mono nets are superb to the nylon "easy casts". The mono sinks quicker, is more durable, and spreads easily. Little white bass tend not to get hung up so easy in themn either. Check the BOC library. Dreadnaught has some wonderful pics and instructions that helped me tremendously.

    Dru
     
  5. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    Yea like every one said go to wally world:big_smile:
     
  6. powercat

    powercat New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Olathe,Ks/Fish Gravois Mi
    I would suggest buying a 7ft. cast net and then check out Dreadnaught instructions on throwing a cast net. It worked for me. I bought a 5 ft easy throw at Wally World and it would be ok if you could see the shad. Most of the time I am casting blind or where I saw a flip 10 or 20 seconds earlier, the extra 4 ft of diameter really helps in finding shad.
     
  7. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Smaller nets are easier to handle than larger ones...a beginner should start with a 3 or 4 foot radius net.

    For that matter, I've been throwing nets for nearly forty years, and my choice is still small and cheap, primarilly because I tear up 2 or 3 a year.
     
  8. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    i agree, walmart. in this catagory cheap is ok. the $19 ones are blue mono and i have no trouble with them. mono can be repaired with 30lb fishing line eaisly when it get tore. ive went through 5-6 in 3 years so buying a $50 net aint gonna happen. the $20 ones work just as well.
     
  9. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Start with a small cheap net, learn to throw it and once you have it mastered go get Yourself a real net, and learn to throw a 7 or 8' footer. You will catch more bait faster With a larger net. Larger nets usaly have a heavier amount of weight per liniar foot and sink faster. A faster sink rate will help quite a bit when the water gets warmer and the bait is faster.

    if you havent completly trashed Your smaller net you can use it as a back up. It sucks when You rip Your net before You have enough bait to fish and you don't have an extra net. My spare little net has saved the day quite a few times, even if We had to throw it twice as much as the bigger net.
     
  10. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    Brad has got it right.

    I learned with a 3 foot net... it was hard to master, but once I figured it out, it was easy. Next I graduated to a five foot net and it cast so easy that I wondered if I should have started here...

    Now I use a ten foot net with a seven foot net in reserve. I have dropped that huge net over so many shad that I could not raise it from the water, but had to release most of them, only to wind up with a half of a 5 gallon bucket filled.

    The worst thing that I ever caught in a net was a 60 pound spoonbill. After getting that monster out of my net and back into the water, I had to sew up a 20 foot rip in that net. :crazy:
     
  11. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Check ur local Wal-Mart they have castnets.
     
  12. Snake Charmer

    Snake Charmer New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Ca/Nv/Az
    I'm a real Newb with the cast nets! :smile2: But, I started with a 3 ft....did--ok. It wasn't long before the salts took pity on me--offered a few pointers, and said get a 4 ft net--ADD 2 or 3 one ounce slip weights (I used 3) around the middle cords (above the Disk) to make the net sink faster and flatter....This has Increased the amount of bait caught! :smile2: ...Enough where I throw/Banana a whole lot less. :wink:
     
  13. jbarnes17

    jbarnes17 New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Commerce, Oklahoma
    A 3 foot net is usually easier to start with. Plus if you are throwing from your boat 3 footers work really well.
     
  14. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    ...Enough where I throw/Banana a whole lot less. :wink:

    We call that tacoing around here

    As in "I couldn't get the net to open I kept Tacoing it!"
     
  15. Travsher

    Travsher New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    Columbus indian
    But what ever you call it, It seems to happen most when you have your eye on a big ball of 6"-8" shad and you miss them by an inch! Good luck with your net.