This might be a stupid question, but hey, I'm from Oklahoma!

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Love Them Cats, Aug 1, 2006.

  1. Love Them Cats

    Love Them Cats New Member

    Messages:
    454
    State:
    Vinita, Oklahoma
    This might be a stupid question, but hey, I'm from Oklahoma, just joking for the rest of you Okies out there!:lol:

    :0a21: I see thermacline mentioned a lot here and wanted to find out what it is?

    I've never heard of it until I joined this site and a lot of you mention it, so I wanted to find out what I'm missing?

    If it will help me catch more and bigger fish, I'll ask all the stupid questions I can think of?:embarrassed_2:

    Ken
     
  2. blindfly69

    blindfly69 New Member

    Messages:
    774
    State:
    kentucky
    i believe it has something to do with the oxygen level shrinking as the water gets deeper....really matters in the summer time
     

  3. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    When it gets hot, water wont hold oxygen very well, so the only oxygen available in a certain body of water will be above a certain depth. Most anything below that wont have enough oxygen for fish to live. It is also where there is a drop in temperature, which I do not understand. I hope this helps :)
     
  4. Love Them Cats

    Love Them Cats New Member

    Messages:
    454
    State:
    Vinita, Oklahoma
    Thanks guy's for the replies?

    Just one more stupid question:
    How do you know what depth it is?

    I don't have a boat or a depth finder and only fish from the bank, so is it something I should check into?

    Ken
     
  5. blindfly69

    blindfly69 New Member

    Messages:
    774
    State:
    kentucky
    idk if there's an exact measuring tool but i've always heard it was around 10 feet
     
  6. Love Them Cats

    Love Them Cats New Member

    Messages:
    454
    State:
    Vinita, Oklahoma
    Thanks Nate, I'll have to remember that next time I go fishing?:0a31:

    Ken
     
  7. Jammer

    Jammer New Member

    Messages:
    584
    State:
    Tennessee
    When I used to scuba dive in fresh water, it was usually between 10 and 15'. Sometimes there would be a second layer at 20 to 25', below that, it was real cold. I always knew it as only a temp change but I guess the O2
    leval is lower in the colder water. I always wondered why there weren't any fish in deep water when it was summer.
     
  8. loki1982

    loki1982 New Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    Here is a quick drawing and explaination of the thermacline

    http://img147.imageshack.us/my.php?image=thermaqk7.jpg

    From what I understand is, during the summer the water begins to heat up very rapidly. Just like air, warm water will rise to the top and cold water to the bottom. Section A is the warm water, section C is the cold water. The water temperture varies so dramatically that an area forms in the middle called the thermacline, section B. Section A has oxygen from the surface, although is lower amounts than during the fall and spring. Section A has light penetrating as well which most fish dont like. Section C has very little to no oxygen, decaying leaves, wood, etc create a high amount of sulphur and ammonia in this layer as well. Now section B offers the best of both worlds. There is oxygen, and its further from the surface giving more protection, and less stress on the fish. Most of the fish will be in section B with a good amount in section A as well but probably not as many. Section C will have very few.

    There is a device you can use to find the theramcline depth. I dont know whats its called. If you use a fish finder, depending on how expensive it is, some will show the thermacline. On ones that dont, its pretty easy to guess its depth based on the fish. In my local lake 55 foot is the deepest hole, with 25-30 being average. The thermacline is almost exactly 15 foot down.

    Some other facts - Not all lakes develope a thermacline. In areas where the water never gets really hot, they may not form. Also lakes that has alot of boat traffic can sometimes not form one because the water is well mixed. Thermaclines to my knoweldge dont form in rivers because fo the current. And ponds can develope thermaclines, but usually dont because they arnt deep enough. Towards the end of summer, and I believe spring, there is a process called "turning over". This is when the water temperture becomes closer to the same and the water mixes, destroying the thermacline. When this happens you can sometimes smell a foul odor on the lake. This is the sulphur and other toxins that were trapped on the bottom, being released.

    Generally you want to fish above the thermacline or in it for best results. This doesnt mean you cant catch fish below it, but the odds are probably lower. We found out the hard way, before we knew about the thermacline when we put out anchors jugs and a 18# bluecat took the bottom hook(25 foot deep). When we checked our line he was dead form lack of oxygen. We no longer use the bottom 2 hooks during summer to make sure the fish are in or above the thermacline.

    I hope this helps and is accurate. Ive read alot about it, and had a few personal experiences with it, and this is what I have come up with.
     
  9. griz

    griz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,744
    State:
    Murray Ky.
  10. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    i always thought when a lake turned over all the fish would die ,but according to what loki1982 is saying ponds and lakes of small sizes turn over every year is this correct ? now iv also been told rivers dont have a thermocline yet the surface temp is hot in the ohio river and 3 ft or so down its quite chilly could this cold water be the thermocline to a small extent if so that would explain why you dont normally catch bass on the bottom cause they require more oxygen than cats is this a good assumption ?
     
  11. metalfisher

    metalfisher New Member

    Messages:
    188
    State:
    Arkansas
    Anyone that has ever snorkelled or Scuba dived has probably swam through a thermacline layer. The difference in temperature can be significant. That is a thermacline.

    The reason it is significant to a fisherman is as others have said, cool water holds more oxygen than warm water.

    Robert
     
  12. Taliesin

    Taliesin New Member

    Messages:
    680
    State:
    Missouri
    There may be some fish kill, but it normally won't kill enough to ruin the lake or pond. Some rivers may have a thermocline, but that is a recent development caused by our dams. Before there would be a constant current that kept the water stirred enough to prevent it. With these dams, if there isn't any current flowing through them, a thermocline can set up in the river. Your situation on the Ohio is normal for any body of water, but if you get down to between 10 and 20 feet and the water suddenly gets really cold, that water is also low on oxygen since it hasn't been near the top in a while.
    Is it true that bass use more oxygen than cats? I haven't heard that before, but I almost always catch bass on bottom (plastic worms, bottom fishing with live bluegill, etc.). If a thermocline has set up, there will be VERY few fish below that line no matter what species. They will make short trips down into it, but they will come back up shortly for the oxygen.
     
  13. Taliesin

    Taliesin New Member

    Messages:
    680
    State:
    Missouri
    The problem with the thermocline is that the cold water hasn't been near the surface for a long time, so the oxygen in it has been used up. This is one of those strange cases where the cold water will have less oxygen than the wormer water. It can hold more oxygen, but the layering is preventing it from getting more.
     
  14. jmfraz

    jmfraz New Member

    Messages:
    34
    State:
    Houston, Texas
    That is another fine example of why I love this site and the brothers in it, I had no idea something like that even existed!! Thanks brothers!!
     
  15. catseeman

    catseeman New Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    State:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Also less oxygen because the rotting vegetation puts off co2 displacing the oxygen.
     
  16. NIMROD

    NIMROD New Member

    Messages:
    175
    State:
    Arkansas
    In some small shallow oxbows fish back up shallow in the shade of trees. The shallow oxygen rich waters may even be cooler.