thermocline levels??

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by brandonbtbt, Jul 29, 2009.

  1. brandonbtbt

    brandonbtbt New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    Cambridge, OH
    does anyone know approx how deep the thermocline is in lakes around SE ohio?? my buddy told me today the thermocline in salt fork is around 8 feet deep.. this makes sense because last night we were in about 10-15' of water and all our bait were dead when we pulled out and also looked like turtles got the best of us.....
     
  2. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I haven't been to Salt Lately, but that sounds about right from thinking back on past years at this time of summer. Thats where them big slip-floats come in real handy!:wink: Goodluck Brandon......rollo
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2009

  3. JBrooks

    JBrooks New Member

    Messages:
    742
    State:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Anyone care to explain what a thermocline is? >.>
     
  4. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    all depends on how deep of water you are in. in 30ft of water the thermocline rides about 12-15ft in mid summer. i always assume its about half-way down in the water column. if you are in a lake that has a really good water flow, or has a lot of natural springs it may not stratify at all. you can usually tell how far down it is by watching your depth finder closely. if you have a good one you can see the thermocline, if not most all the fish, especially baitfish will hang at the same level.
     
  5. brandonbtbt

    brandonbtbt New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    Cambridge, OH
    The thermocline is the transition layer between the mixed layer at the surface and the deep water layer. The definitions of these layers are based on temperature. The mixed layer is near the surface where the temperature is roughly that of surface water. In the thermocline, the temperature decreases rapidly from the mixed layer temperature to the much colder deep water temperature.
    The mixed layer and the deep water layer are relatively uniform in temperature, while the thermocline represents the transition zone between the two.







    basically this means theres a certain depth of water in larger lakes that have no oxygen below it.. only turtles go down below the thermocline... so at salt for if its around 8' deep that means any living fish that ventures deeper than that will die....
     
  6. brandonbtbt

    brandonbtbt New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    Cambridge, OH
    of course just google thermocline and you can read up on the science of it and all that stuff......... it's a very important thing to know about especially for catfisherman that fish the bottom most of the time....
     
  7. JBrooks

    JBrooks New Member

    Messages:
    742
    State:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    I assume it doesn't apply to rivers.
    Yeah, definitely something good to know.
    Thanks.
     
  8. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
  9. Catmanblues

    Catmanblues New Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    State:
    S.E Ohio
    Interesting info thanks,,,
     
  10. fredrick

    fredrick New Member

    Messages:
    34
    State:
    Ohio
    Oxygen levels are reduced below the themocline. Some fish like musky spend a good deal of the summer just below this level.
     
  11. armyhooah

    armyhooah New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    Lebanon, Ohio
    That's good to know.
     
  12. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    dont think that rivers dont get a "thermocline". i have seen it a couple times in really deep holes during very dry spells where there is almost no current. in 30ft of water no live bait would live below 12-15ft so we had to use floats.
     
  13. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    All bodys of water are affected by a thermacline. Rivers are alot different from lakes, ponds though. Fish in the rivers simply move locations and have opportunity to feed in other areas. Fish in lakes seem to move, but are more lathargic than river fish. Yes, they can be caught! But, seems they aren't as easy to target! If I was to target lake fish after post spawn.. I fish after good rains, or in areas where there is baitballs hovering above the cline around areas that have structure, or a positioned point! . Rivers, I like below riffles!:wink: rollo
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2009