The good old days!

Discussion in 'LOCAL KANSAS TALK' started by Dsage, Jul 9, 2009.

  1. Dsage

    Dsage Active Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas
    I ran accross this and thought some would like to read it.
    Man what it must of been like to have 100lb plus fish pulled out almost daily.

    206 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY
    BORDER SENTIMENTS
    From The Democratic Platform, Liberty, Mo., June 15, 1854.
    We are in favor of making Kansas a slave state, if it should require half the citizens of Missouri, musket in hand, to emigrate there, and even sacrifice their lives in accomplishing so desirable an end.
    AN ASIDE TO FISHERMEN From The Herald of Freedom, Lawrence,
    July 11, 1857.

    A catfish was caught in the Kansas river near town, a few days since, which weighed 111 pounds.
    The Topeka Tribune, April 21, 1859.
    One of our compositors getting fishy, on Tuesday, he absconded and took to the Kaw for the purpose of trying his luck in catching whales, of which this river abounds. He brought one up, as a present to us, that weighs ninety-two pounds and a half. Great is the Kaw for catfish.
    The Topeka Tribune, June 23, 1859.
    BIG FISH.-Two large catfish were captured in the Kaw this morning. The largest one weighing, net, 160 pounds. The smaller one 110 pounds. The mouth of the larger one measured, on the inside, eight by twelve inches. That fellow could carry a pretty good lunch in his head.
    The Topeka Tribune, September 3, 1859.
    The Kaw river is said to be unsafe for the navigation of large-class catfish this season!
    State Record, Topeka, June 10, 1863.
    A catfish was caught in the Kansas river last week, near Calhoun's, two miles below this city, which weighed 106 pounds.
    The Junction City Union, July 22, 1865.
    A party of soldiers the other day hauled out of the Republican, with seine, at one time, seven fish, weighing from forty to 105 pounds. The two that we saw, weighing Sixty-eight and seventy-three, were four feet long. These finny gunboats ply the Smoky Hill, Republican, Saline, Solomon and their tributaries.
    Topeka Weekly Leader, July 26, 1866.
    We saw, the other day, four fine specimens of the finny tribe, weighing from sixty-five to 100 pounds, which some of Ike Walton's disciples had hooked from the Kaw.
    The Junction City Union, October 6, 1866.
    A catfish, weighing 125 pounds, was drawn from the Republican, at Bachelder, a few days ago. We saw one at Watson & Record's butcher shop, which was caught in the Smoky Hill, the length of which was about five feet, and about fifteen or eighteen inches across the head.
    BYPATHS OF KANSAS HISTORY 207 The Junction City Weekly Union, August 17, 1867.
    A fish was caught in the Smoky Hill last Saturday, and served up in one of our markets, which weighed 120 pounds.
    The Manhattan Standard, May 8, 1869.
    The editor acknowledges the receipt of a fine, nine-pound rock bass, caught by the Manhattan fishing company in the Blue, and presented by Mr. King for the company. It was a splendid fish, and made an ample meal for two families. The fishing company is catching large quantities of fish, and some of their hauls are magnificent.
    The Manhattan Standard, May 22, 1869.
    A GOOD HAUL.-The "King boys" caught 112 pounds of catfish one night this week at Rocky Ford, on their trot lines. . . . Part of them were sent to the Topeka market.
    The Manhattan Standard, June 19, 1869.
    SOME FISH.-Last week a fishing company that operates in the Kansas river south of this city, caught a catfish weighing 1311/2 pounds, and the next day one that weighed eighty-nine, and the day following one that weighed sixty-five pounds, besides large numbers of small cats (would they be kittens?). This is doing pretty well and it wasn't a good week for fish either. The Manhattan Standard, June 11, 1870.
    FISH.-The Rocky Ford dam affords a splendid place for capturing catfish just now, and the people from all the country gather there for the sport. Some very large ones have been taken lately. Mr. Thomas Hair, from Wild Cat, took about 400 pounds a few days ago. On Thursday, Messrs. Jenkins, Horton, Elder and A. M. Tyler made a visit to the dam, and returned with about 100 pounds of fish. The largest cat weighed forty-eight pounds. They left a twenty pounder at "our house," whereat the editor makes his best bow. Baked catfish is good. The Nationalist, Manhattan, April 21, 1871.
    BIG FISHING.-Harry Pipher caught on an "out" line one day this week, a catfish that weighed forty pounds. Harry himself weighs fifty-six. The Wyandotte Gazette, May 11, 1871.
    Messrs. Fisher & Woodcock, who explore the muddy Missouri and the raging Kaw in pursuit of the finny tribe, caught a bouncing catfish Wednesday night on a hook set about forty rods up the Kaw from its mouth. As they carried it along the Street hung to a pole, supported on their shoulders, its tail dragged a foot of its length on the ground, and it weighed 139 pounds. We made a dinner out of a fine Steak of it Thursday, and it was very tender, rich and lucious. The Wichita City Eagle, April 19, 1872.

    The vicious manner in which the little river is being dragged with hundreds of yards of net is depleting its waters of fish. One fisherman claims to have made a haul of thirty hundred. Sportsmen are growing justly indignant. 208 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY
    The Wichita City Eagle, June 28, 1872.
    Fish are being caught daily in large quantities from the river with hook and line. We saw a catfish weighing forty pounds brought to shore a few days ago by a staring-eyed amateur. We tried to coax him to run.
    The Daily Kansas Tribune, Lawrence, May 22, 1873.
    Fish stories in these parts have always been exceedingly plentiful, but fresh fish from the Kaw usually are quite scarce. A. V. Brown, the fisherman, in- forms us that he is now having splendid success, having caught a number of fish last night, one of which weighed eighty-four pounds.
    The Miami Republican, Paola, June 2, 1876.
    Tilton & Gano bought a nice lot of fish caught in the Pottawatomie, on Wednesday, one of them a "cat" weighing fifty-six pounds, and a number of them ranging from twenty to forty pounds.
    The Daily Tribune, Lawrence, April 10, 1877.
    The veritable old shovel-mud-catfish which Noah had in his Ark was caught in the Kaw the other day, and its head is on exhibition at Kretsinger & Timmons' grocery store-on so much exhibition that you have to go in at the back door to get out. at the front, the thing's mute sticks a good ways across the street. The whole institution weighed over 100 pounds.
    The Western Home Journal, Lawrence, April 12, 1877.
    A fish known as the "shovel-nosed cat" was taken from the river yesterday morning, its guessed-at weight being 250 pounds.
    The Daily Tribune, Lawrence, April 28, 1877.
    A fisherman was observed this morning going down street carrying one large and one small catfish of such weight as to almost dislocate his shoulder. Upon his countenance he wore a wan expression of weariness.
    The Nationalist, Manhattan, June 29, 1877.
    Last Wednesday night Lewis Glasgow caught a catfish in the Blue river that weighed ninety-one pounds.

    link to the site http://www.kshs.org/publicat/khq/1938/38_2_bypaths.htm
     
  2. KC Jayhawk 78

    KC Jayhawk 78 New Member

    Messages:
    3,236
    State:
    Kansas City, Ks
    Great find Dan. Just goes to show what it could be like for everyone. :sad2:
     

  3. jmanion8

    jmanion8 New Member

    Messages:
    424
    State:
    Kansas
    That's unbelievable!
     
  4. Dsage

    Dsage Active Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas
    This was the best part

    The Western Home Journal, Lawrence, April 12, 1877.
    A fish known as the "shovel-nosed cat" was taken from the river yesterday morning, its guessed-at weight being 250 pounds.:eek:oooh::eek:oooh::eek:oooh:
     
  5. stoney53

    stoney53 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,380
    State:
    PA
    very interesting...thanks for the post
     
  6. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,507
    State:
    Napoleon, Mo.
    Thanks for the post. The good ole days!!
     
  7. bigd4xman

    bigd4xman New Member

    Messages:
    241
    State:
    Haysville, KS
    Thats almost unbelievable, just imagine is some of those 100 pounders were still alive today, Toronto lake is rumored to have two or three flatheads living at the base of the dam that are close to the size of a VW Bug, this reported by a Corps Of Engineers diver brought in to inspect the dam around 1998:crazy:.
     
  8. n2fishn

    n2fishn New Member

    Messages:
    7,333
    State:
    Topeka,Kan
    Dan thanks for finding/posting this.It is something that these kind of fish were around just a little over 100yrs ago.

    Man i wish Jim would post some of pictures!!:smile2::smile2:
     
  9. unclebuncle

    unclebuncle New Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    State:
    Humboldt,K
    I first heard that story about 1958
     
  10. River Outlaw

    River Outlaw New Member

    Messages:
    2,836
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas,
    :smile2::smile2::smile2:
     
  11. Dsage

    Dsage Active Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas
    Good thing Jim is still sleeping and wont get this for 3 more hours, when you are in bed. :smile2:
     
  12. KC Jayhawk 78

    KC Jayhawk 78 New Member

    Messages:
    3,236
    State:
    Kansas City, Ks
    Thats great !!!
     
  13. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
     
  14. bigdj

    bigdj New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Missouri
    wow great post
     
  15. mcseal2

    mcseal2 Active Member

    Messages:
    503
    State:
    Kansas
    There are probably less huge fish than ever before, and more people fishing for them. The bright side is that there are definitely more people turning them back than ever before. Maybe if catch and release continues to spread we will see things improve.
     
  16. Katatonik

    Katatonik New Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    State:
    Ogden, Kansas,
    They had a tendancy to exaggerate back then, but there had to be some
    truth to all of those stories. I imagine there were a few 150 lb catfish
    caught back then for sure, but I have my doubts about the 250lber.
    Time will tell on whether things will get better as folks become a little
    more careful about what they put into the river. Or take out of it.