Target practice

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by Katfish Kern, Oct 18, 2008.

  1. Katfish Kern

    Katfish Kern New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Florida
    So I am in my back yard shooting my PSE, and for some reason I can be dead on some days and destroy a beer can from 30 yards all day. And others I will always shoot the right and up about 3-4 inches. Is this from my release being to tight or loose on my hand? Maybe I am dropping the bow, or jerking the trigger. And help will be welcomed. This is the first year for me in archery, and I really want to harvest a deer this year, and I dont want to blow my chances with a junk shoot. Thx.
     
  2. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    Good luck shooting, Im new myself also, just a few weeks. Ill be ready next year, I dont want to rush it. :cool2:
     

  3. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    If you can peg the can consitently some days and not others I would say it is your form. If you notice yourself doing this and cant figure it out. Videotape yourself shooting or have someone watch you to see how your form looks or if your doing anything different when you shoot. Do this when you are shooting well and when you are not shooting well. That way you can see the difference in your shot. Make sure on the draw back that your anchoring your nock point at the same place everytime. Other than that all I can tell you is practice.
     
  4. germanmudfish

    germanmudfish New Member

    Messages:
    492
    State:
    Gray, GA
    Everything exactly the same every shot. Make sure hand positions are the same, shooting a release (yuk) make sure it's held the same every time. String on your nose, cheek and/or chin in the same place every time. Hand holding the bow, fingers in the same position every time. Shooting a sight, make sure the exact same picture every time. Today's shorter bows are not very forgiving with any differences in your form. Check your stance and balance, same every time. This may sound silly, but watch the clothing you wear as well. Different fabric pulls against you in different ways. One other thing, try one or two more ounces of counter balance. Good Luck..
    Ronnie
     
  5. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    The part about shooting to the right occasionally sounds like your torquing the bow when it fires. I have wrist straps on all my bows and shoot open handed. If your gripping it there is a good chance your pulling it off. The part about shooting high, i dunno. Usually if your dropping your arm, you'll shoot low. I also agree that regardless of where you chose to anchor, be consistent. Very consistent.
     
  6. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Sounds like your torquing the bow. Make sure your grip is loose and the pressure point is on the meaty part of the palm of your gip hand. Never grip the bow tightly, always let the fingertips rest loosely on the bow grip or shoot open handed. Another thing is never punch the trigger. Get the index finger wrapped aroung the trigger and apply pressure then push and pull with the back muscles. This will give the best shot possible and if done right will make the bow go off with a Surprise. Surprise Release, BACK TENSION METHOD. Video of yourself shooting can be very beneficial in finding bad shooting habits that you can relate too. Having someone that knows archery watch you shoot can be very helpful too. Dont't over practice either, when you feel yourself getting tired, STOP, and start later. 20 good shots are better that 30 bad shots. That's how bad shooting habits start and possible TARGET PANIC. The archer's worst enemy.:confused2:

    GOOD LUCK AND GOOD SHOOTING!!:wink::wink:
    Mark..
     
  7. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    These guys have given you great advice, you have tapped into years of
    experience. I would like to add one bit of advice. When bowhunting you
    have hours of waiting sometimes cold and boring and then 10 minutes
    of shear heart pumping excitement. You can't shoot like artillery where
    a spotter says right 3 in. down 2 in. now fire for effect. Don't get me wrong
    you need to shoot a lot, that bow should feel like an extention of your arm.
    But to practice the actual bow shot on game, besides your normal practice
    set up a target close to the house where when leave for work get your bow
    and shoot one time. When watching TV and a commercial comes on step
    outside and make one shot. Move your target around shoot different ranges
    and angles. When you can stack these single shots without any warmups
    you can see if you are ready to bow hunt. The best advice a veteran bow
    hunter ever gave me was "you do not shoot at a deer with your bow,
    you shoot at a very small spot on a deer with your bow."
    Good Luck Its hard work but the reward is worth it.
     
  8. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Like Poppa just said, you shoot at a very small portion of a deer. A single hair,,,thats right a single hair if you can focus on it. It's hard to do it in the rocks where i'm at but practicing with judo points is great practice judging yardage. Throw plastic pop bottles and shoot the unknown distances and when you go retrive your arrows, step it off.
    Also like Mark said, a little good practice is worth alot more than poor practice. I shoot off the back deck and often shoot a arrow and go back inside. The moment your shooting starts to fall apart, stop. Walk away and come back after while. Good luck
     
  9. Shenandoah

    Shenandoah New Member

    Messages:
    72
    State:
    Virginia
    yeah definately sounds like your torquing the riser, stop grasping the the bow and just have your hand there to keep it stable my hand is wide open when shooting. a strap that fastens to your stabilizer will help with this. also a level on my sight keeps me from leaning to much. what kind of release do you shoot? It could be that. The trigger style is and easy one to flinch on, also the type of jaws affects the release alot too. To improve your field shooting try sitting in a chair to simulate a tree stand. Most of the deer I kill are shot while I'm sitting down. Also helps to practice while nealing.
     
  10. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    All good advice,,,
    Only thing I didn't hear mentioned is to push your bow holding hand through the target and follow through. Part of good form, also. I have always used a strap, goes from the bow, mounted where a stabilizer screws in,( on compounds) that goes around the wrist, and an open hand just used to push the bow towards the target,(same with pistols) Never used a release, just used the ones I was born with, but, with the short bows being used, I think I understand. Be the arrow, follow through.
    I always like to practice to fatigue, not exhaustion, in all weather, every light condition available, constantly measure and check yardage. I personally have gone to long bows and instinctive shooting.
    Best practice is "stump shooting" out in the field, If possible.
    Get used to your equipment. Like casting to the right spot in the dark,,,,
    Good luck!!:big_smile:
     
  11. germanmudfish

    germanmudfish New Member

    Messages:
    492
    State:
    Gray, GA
    excellent advise. Cold bore shot......
     
  12. Katfish Kern

    Katfish Kern New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Florida
    Thanks fellas, I have tried all of your advice and can see a huge change. It was all in my grip. And now time for a second question.....I have 4 pins on my sight. Right now I am only using one, and it is the top pin. I am shooting at 20-25 yards. What distances should I set all three pins at??
     
  13. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh New Member

    Messages:
    458
    State:
    Ohio
    Generally you set them @ 10, 20, 30, and 40 for the woods around here. Ive seen guys with 6 or 7 pins out west.
     
  14. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    If you have a fast bow genernally 1 pin will work from 10 to 30 yards with a little practice. I only use 1 pin but I have hardly ever shot past 30 yards with mine. As Josh said most set them up at 10, 20 30, and so on.
     
  15. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    I got a 20 and a 30 yd. pin. Seldom have i used the 30 however. Ole Caroline ain't hoss enuff to be shootin into the next county.:smile2: Most of my shots are 20 and less to be honest.
    I can tell the folks heah know their stuff and more than willing to help someone. Don't get any better than that.
     
  16. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    I would start using the top pin at 20yds and the rest at 30, 40, 50 and 60 respectively. I have a 7 pin sight and there set at 20-80 yds. Usually I will keep the 20-40 set and drop the rest down while hunting. 7 pins gets to be to much guess work. I'll set them while plinking at targets and just messing around. I like to keep my maximum range at 40yds, but have confidence at longer distances, if the shot presents itself.
     
  17. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    The seven deadly pins. :cool2:
     
  18. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    Yep, a rangefinder can work wonders!!!:wink:, If you're a Spaz it won't make you shoot any better, but, can certainly boost your confidence, during practice runs, and if time during a hunt, give you the info to choose the correct pin to use, that you've worn yourself out practicing with!!!!:smile2:

    Don't tell anybody, but, the best practice I ever got was shooting at jackrabbits..with my broadheads of choice,,Zwickey Black diamonds, or Bear Razorheads,,, yea, I know, they're probably antiques now,,,,,:roll_eyes:,,, but, everything I ever killed with is still dead,,, LOL
    eyeball range, shoot, double check range, if necessary.:wink:

    Also, that kind of practice will tell your personal range limitation, to ensure lethal hits on your game,, deer, elk n such. my personal best for hunting,(years ago) was 40 yds, I could shoot longer KNOWN ranges very accurately, but, for me too much variable for hunting. never liked the Hail Mary shots at game. Practicing at ridiculously long ranges will make moderately long ranges seem "do-able" over time.
     
  19. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    That's correct! The seven deadly pins Cameron Hanes signature SPOT HOGG sight! Great sight with bright pins. Costs a little more, but I like it alot.
     
  20. jodster

    jodster New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    texas
    More pins more confusing, thats what I was told! I guess I don't shoot my bow enough but, I always have to think lowest pin farther shot, highest pin closer shot! I was started out instictive shooting ( no sights)!
    Hey, snagged2 When I moved to Texas the first jack rabbits I saw I thought were deer, there were three of them setting in the road. I said "look at the deer! look at the size of them ears!! They must of been at least four foot tall! Maybe I'm mistaking on the height the first time I seen a deer running in the woods I thought it tail was three feet tall, my dad informed me that the tail is only 6-8 inches that most of what I seen was hind end!