Talking To Old Folks

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by catfishkatmando, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. catfishkatmando

    catfishkatmando New Member

    Messages:
    494
    State:
    Salem, WV.
    With the history books getting a politically correct face lift so often these days,and technology running full speed I wonder what is going to happen to the vast amount of knowledge , skills and truths that old people posess.
    The storys they can share with us, the valuable information they can share.
    I have a series of boks about Appalachia called foxfire they were compiled by high school students about 30 years ago and they are great but you can't ask a book a question,so I figure we need to talk to old folks more. It is a win-win situation good for both of us.
     
  2. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    thats a good idea ,they are full of knowledge and wisdom. Problem is there isn't to many ol timers left in this ol world. They have paid thier dues and gone home to rest. GOD BLESS THEM ALL!!
     

  3. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I often fing myself speaking with the older folks around my home and where I fish, they are a great source of knowledge and have my respect. Peewee is a prime example if I had half his knowledge I would be a dangerous fisherman. There are many others on this site that have a great deal of know how also Peewee just came to mind first.
     
  4. jailcop2

    jailcop2 New Member

    Messages:
    1,069
    State:
    iowa
    I have had some of the Foxfire books for 20 years now ,they are very intresting . I also video'd my grandma before she died , she came from Washington to I owa on a coverd wagon and had great stories . We are all losing pieces of our heritage by not taking the time to listen .
    Brian
     
  5. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    Good Thread...
    Last year I was sitting in a waiting room. There was an Elderly Gentlemen sitting there and I overheard him talking.. He mentioned that he was 109 years old.. It got me to thinking about all the things that man has seen in his life..Pretty much every great achievement and downfall we have had.. Mind boggling to think of all the changes he has went through in his lifetime..
     
  6. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Good thread William!

    My father in law died 4 years ago, he was 86. The last few years I really enjoyed hearing him talk about the old days. He had seen a lot of changes in his time. A penny was still worth something to him. My dad died many years ago, he would have been 111. Back before he died I was younger and like most of the younger generation I had no interest in the past. But as you get older it becomes much more important... wish I could talk with him today.

    Picture of my Dad, Mom and Brother on there way to California from TX, I remember him telling me some of the road going into CA was wood.
     

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  7. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Excellant point William! I just seem to gravitate towards them in store and what not. Next thing ya know ya been there for a while and the Mrs. is givein me the look! LOL!

    It seems like in todays society they are ignored cause everyone is in such a big dam hurry to do nothin or they are too busy on the phone.

    Dayton,you never cease to amaze me with the pics you pull out the boxes! LOL!
     
  8. cattinfever999

    cattinfever999 New Member

    Messages:
    426
    State:
    KY
    When my Grandmother(the last of my grandparents) passed away about 6 years ago, we(her children and I) sat down to read the will and go through paperwork. My Mom, aunt and uncle came across my grandparents marriage certificate. It was dated 1960. You can not imagine the shock on these people's faces.:eek:oooh: . Well, my mom was born in 1952, aunt in 1953 and uncle in 1954. They had no idea. They looked at me and asked why I wasn't as shocked as them. I replied "because I took the time to ask questions and she talked to me". I have since been their source of information about my grandparents. By the way, my grandparents were only married 11 years before I was born!!

    Before both of my husband's grandparents died, I sat down with them and asked them how they met. It was so nice to see them(in their 90's) to recall the old days. My husband and his father learned a little info that day that they didn't know. I am so glad that i asked. They passed away a short time later.

    I wish more people would take the time to talk to their elders and learn things that they will NEVER learn in books. Real life.
     
  9. Georgiajack

    Georgiajack New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Georgia
    Amen. Do it while there are still some around to learn from. Seems like there is not as many old folks around as they used to be. Jack.
     
  10. BamaCats Lady

    BamaCats Lady New Member

    Messages:
    312
    State:
    Luverne, Alabama
    My dad's parent's were deceased before I wass born, but his father's name is on the wall at Ellis Island. He came over from Poland, as did my father's grand paerents on his mother's side. They were from the same village near Warsaw. My Dad is still alive, but greiving for my mother, so he is kind of in his own world right now. He is also a recovering (I HOPE) alcoholic, so we are going thru a very selfish stage with him.
    My mother's parents were first generation Americans, their parent'e also emmigrated from Poland. They were also from the same village as my dad's family. My grandmother developed alzheimers or senility, as they called it then, when I was about 6 years old, and died when I was 11. So her stories about her childhood were very colorful. She couldn'y remember who I was, but, the past was fresh in her mind & I used to love listening to her. Grandpa was fairly healthy & in complete controll of his faculties & also told some pretty colorful stories of his own, but he would also talk about the war & history & how things have really changed since he was a boy.
    I used to treasure the times when the family would gather together and tell stories of when they grew up! My dad was 1 of 15! So there were tons of stories to tell.
    Now that my mom has passed away, I really feel a loss, almost likt my link to the past has been cut. Even tho I eas adopted at birth I was never led to feel like an outsider. I was always treated like "blood kin" (damn I have been in the south too long!)
    Just typing this out has been somewhat catharthic, my hands are shaking & I have tears in my eyes. I really miss Mom. I always knew I needed her. And more importantly she knew how much I loved her.
    Sorry I got sappy guys...
    Lisa
     
  11. cattinfever999

    cattinfever999 New Member

    Messages:
    426
    State:
    KY
    Thanks for sharing, Lisa. That's an awesome family history.You were adopted at birth--that's great. You're even stronger than blood--you were chosen!
     
  12. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    That's the reason I come here... to listen to the wisdom of ... the old folks.
     
  13. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    William, you are so right. The sad fact about this is that these days many young people are so caught up in their own lives and activities that they never realize this. Oh, the knowledge they could glean just by spending an afternoon on the porch listening to some of their elders. I was blessed with a wonderful family of storytellers, with my grandmother at the top of the list. When I was a youngster we'd sit on my great-grandmother's carport, the whole bunch of us.....Gran, her mom, her five brothers and sisters --- sometimes a few cousins too. Everybody would grab a piece of newspaper and a brown sack of freshly picked green beans, and the stringing and snapping would begin. And so would the storytelling. I learned so much about family history during these hot summer evenings. Of course, nobody can remember every single fact; videos and/or tapes are a wonderful tool. I actually have a cassette tape (albeit poor quality now) of my great-grandmother's voice. Luckily in my case, researchers and writers abound in my world. I have copies of my grandmother's life story, an autobiography by my great-great aunt, a wonderful record by a great aunt in Texas (including all the stories HER parents told HER) from the opposite side of the family, and a complete Huffman family genealogical/historical record tracing my roots back to the 1600s, plus several other relevant writings. They are CHOCK FULL of how and why things were done, when things were invented, and true recolllections of how life was in those days; some very interesting information about life during the Civil War, for instance. I also have all the information I personally collected digging into the subject for a school project. To all the young people reading this, keep your eyes and ears open. REALLY listen and observe, ask questions. Write it down or videotape the older members of your family. If you don't have any, visit a rest home, you'll be sure to find someone who would love to talk to you. You may not think so right now, but one day you will be SO happy you did. I am.
     
  14. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
    I'll never forget one day when my fishing buddy was 3 hours late. I was suppose to meet him at his grandmother's and when I got there she was setting out on the front porch. Her health was failing but her mind was as sharp as anybody I have ever met. She was 96 years old and she told me about things I had studied in school as history but it was first hand knowledge to her. I hated it when my buddy finally showed up and while we fished I kept going on about how cool his 'Gran' was and about the all things she told me and he didn't really care. I knew more about her life experiences than he did. I never had the opportunity to visit with her again but I'll not forget her.

    ST
     
  15. flatheadmaniac

    flatheadmaniac New Member

    Messages:
    101
    State:
    Missouri
    i agree we all can learn so much from ole timers. i try to talk to them when i see them. iv elearned a lot from my own grandad about everything there all so full of info. thanks for sharing such a good thread!
     
  16. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    On the Bryan County Georgia side of the Ogeechee River.Approximately 150 yards up stream From the Highway 204 Morgans Bridge is a Slough.At low water,you can still see the old Cypress and Fat Lighter logs laying side by side in the old Corduroy Road that led to the Sandstone ford across the river.Old maps show this road and crossing in pre Revolutionary War times.This is the old Kings Stage Coach Road.I don;t know of a older Corduroy section in the USA.This is just beyond the border and North West corner of Fort Stewart.I know where a couple more are.I Listened and more important,I HEARD old folks when I was a child.I then went a looked when I could for the places and things that they talked about.I learned where they stacked the wood for the Steamboats at the landings on the Savannah River and how they got paid.At the end of their stack of wood they drove a stick in the ground and split the end.When a Steamboat took on their wood,they left the money wedged in the split.Also a old Steamboat boiler stoker filed me in on his life.Mighty hot,mighty hot were his favorite descriptions.peewee-williams
     
  17. dreamer34

    dreamer34 New Member

    Messages:
    849
    State:
    danville virginia
    my grandfather once told me when an older person starts talking...hush up listen and learn and i still belive in those words today
     
  18. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    I think I said something like that, recently.

    Peewee, I'd like to come by some day and find out a bit more about the old roads in Ga that you might recall. Nothing like research to dig up historical items. Ain't promising , but it's on my things to do before much longer.
     
  19. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    You can find many old maps on line that shows old roads and trails.REMEMBER when researching.Georgia was taken from South Carolina and was originally a part of that state.I don;t know why,but many forget or ignore this.Also.I find taught history often WRONG if you can check and find descriptions of it by the people that lived it at the time.Authors of our history books do love to put down their own interpritations of what "realy happened."So many experts of today know far more than the people that were there at the time.I did love the old books when you could check them out from the Library of Congress.peewee-williams
     
  20. Tinboat

    Tinboat New Member

    Messages:
    207
    State:
    Jonesboro, Arkansas
    I had the pleasure of meeting a lady in the mountains of Va. a few years ago who was 102 at the time. I got to spend about 2 hours talking to her that day. I wish I could have had 2 weeks or more. The stories she told were wonderful. She was living within 50' of the house she was born in.