Synthetic Oils

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by Doyle, Feb 26, 2006.

  1. Doyle

    Doyle New Member

    Messages:
    582
    State:
    Illinois
    I have an older Mariner 40 hp motor on my boat. I always pre mix it to 50:1. Are the Synthetic oils better than regular out board 2-cycle Engine oil. I have only used regular oil on it.
     
  2. Crispy Critter

    Crispy Critter New Member

    Messages:
    431
    State:
    Missouri
    It's funny how the oils we have used for years are all at once not good enough anymore.I am getting ready to switch my truck over to mobil1 synthetic the next warm day,probably tomorrow.Everyone is swearing by all this synthetic stuff nowdays.In the truck I can see where it 'might' be better.It is alot more tolerent to temperature change,it is still able to pour at much colder temperatures and more resistant to thermal breakdown.But I'm fixin' to find out if it's really worth $5somethin a quart.As for the 2cycle stuff I would like to know myself what the upside of it would be since we're burning it pretty quick anyway.I'm sure someone will come along in moment and enlighten us both on the subject.At the cost of it I'm not sure who's getting the best benefit us or the guys making it... ;)
     

  3. Cat Tale

    Cat Tale New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Wilmington
    In a 2 stroke engine the oil you burn is also the only lubrication the rod and crank bearings get before it is sucked into the combustion chamber to be burned and lube the top end.Synthetic oil lubes better,can stand the heat better and burns cleaner.It does cost more in the short haul,but in the long run may just be better for your engine.When I raced dirt bikes,I noticed a huge difference as far as engine componets lasting longer when useing the synthetics.Although I don't always use it in my boat engine because I'm a cheap skate and don't really run the engine very hard.But when I don't use it,I'll run her a little rich just to be safe.
     
  4. 1sporticus

    1sporticus Active Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    State:
    Iowa
    I changed over to synthetic a few years ago, I was looking to try and cut the smokey haze down when idling. I found that it did indeed cut the smoke down, and my engine also seemed not to load up at an idle as much. I have noticed that I use a little less synthetic than regular oil. The cost is more, but the benefits are better, so I can justify the extra expense which is not all that bad.
     
  5. Snobal

    Snobal New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    Canton, OH
    Crispy Critter--- I don't know what year your truck is or how many miles but keep in mind the properties of synthetic motor oils. They are thinner with better viscosity and will find any small holes in gaskets, rings, valve seats, etc. On older vehicles I would highly reccomend using a synthetic blend rather than a full synthetic. I personally don't want to spend $5+ per quart to have part of it sitting in a puddle on the floor of my garage or burning out my exhaust.
     
  6. Crispy Critter

    Crispy Critter New Member

    Messages:
    431
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks for the tip Snobal,I know what you mean about the synthetic.I have a Ford explorer with about 78,000 original miles on it.I had switched over to the blend a couple oil changes ago.I wanted to run it first to see how it went.So far I haven't had any trouble with it.The synthetic kind of cleans the sludge in the engine also.I always did my changes at 3,000 and before it was still pretty clean when I changed it but after I switched to the blend that first change was getting kinda black.This time it's not as bad but it's getting dirty.I'm going to put the full synthetic in and change it the first time at 3,000 also.If it looks cleaner by then I will try to get 5,000 on the next one.That will depend on how it looks though,I'll change it if it starts getting dirty regardless of the miles if needed.
     
  7. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    MOBIL 1 has a new extended life syn oil that will mitigate the costs somewhat.I started using Mobil 1 when it came out.Had a Surburban then with a 350 engine in it and was living in Colo.The synthetic was far better on those sub freezing mornings,gave better gas mileage,resisted heat and reduced wear.We rebuilt the engine at 200,000 miles and the mechanic was amazed at how clean and sludge free it was and how little wear it had.He miked the crank and camshaft and it was amazing.Traded that vehicle at 350,000 miles and a lady bought it in NC and drove it to California and back with no problems and it was running like a top last time I heard about it.Changed the oil and filter every 3000.My Mercury Optimax calls for a syn.blend oil and that is what I use.I think syn is even better in outboards because of the way the lube themselves.Any time you have metal to metal moving parts the slicker the lube the better in my opinion.:)
     
  8. JAYNC

    JAYNC New Member

    Messages:
    1,312
    State:
    Newport N.C.
    I also run Mobil one in my truck, I just bought the new 15,000 mile interval oil. I am not sure if I will let it go that long. Normally I keep the same oil and just change the filter every 3000 miles, and replace the oil every 6-7000. I have never had a problem yet. I haven't put it in my new 4 stroke merc yet because I am waiting till about 50hrs or so for proper break in with conventional oil. you can bet though as soon as that 50hr mark is here its getting Mobil 1 oil.
     
  9. cat daddy 791

    cat daddy 791 New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    Kansas- Wichita
    One Thing You Guys Might Take Into Consideration When Running A Fully Synthetic Engine Oil In Your Car Or Truck, Is If Your Engine Has A Hydraulic Roller Camshaft In It? If Your Engine Does Have One, You Should Use A Synthetic Blend. I Have Been Involved In Several Areas Of Motorsports My Entire Life. I Have Re-built Engines For Years And I Have Built My Own Racing Engines, So I Feel Confident In Sharing This Information. I Also Grew Up With My Family Owning An Auto Parts Store. In My Quest For More Power And Longer Life For My Own Engines, I Made A Call To The Guys At Valvoline. They Told Me That If Your Engine Has A Standard Flat Tappet Hydraulic Camshaft, The Fully Synthetic Is The Way To Go. In Most Of The Later Model Vehicles Made In The Last 10 Years, The Manufacturers Changed The Valvetrain To A Hydraulic Roller Set Up. This Was Designed For Longer Vavletrain Life And Increased Power Output. The Roller Lifter Needs To Be In Contact With The Camshaft At All Times. They Did Increase The Valve Spring Pressure For This. But When A Fully Synthetic Engine Oil Is Used, The Friction Between The Lifter And The Camshaft Is Reduced Drastically. This Causes The Lifter To Loose Contact With The Camshaft At Higher Rpms. In A Sense - "skipping". This Will Destoy Your Vavletrain In A Short Amount Of Time. So The Semi-synthetic Or A Synthetic Blend Would Be The Best Alternative For That Application. Hope This Helps.
     
  10. JAYNC

    JAYNC New Member

    Messages:
    1,312
    State:
    Newport N.C.
    If that were true wouldnt pure synthetic oils have warnings on them, that they could potentially damage engines with those valve trains. I know there has to be a lot of people running synthetic in those engines, and if it was ruining them the synthetic oil manufacturers would be hurting from all the claims against them. ???
     
  11. cat daddy 791

    cat daddy 791 New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    Kansas- Wichita
    I Have Never Used A Fully Synthetic Myself Because Of My Own Beliefs. I Use Valvoline Racing Oil In Everything I Own. It Already Has Friction Reducers Added. I Also Use 1 Quart Of Lucas Oil Stabilizer In Every Oil Change. Without Reading The Container On Synthetic Oils, I Couldn't Tell You If They Have A Warning Or Not. But Your Vehicle Owners Manual Will Tell You Engine Oil Recommendations From The Manufacturer. For People Who Don't Read The Owners Manual Before Hand, I'm Sure They Will Regret It. Besides, So Many People Don't Even Change Their Own Oil These Days. My Best Friend Is A Service Writer For Pep Boys And They Have People Ask For Fully Synthetic Oil Almost Daily. They Get Upset When He Tells Them The Same Thing. But They Are Usually Very Satisfied With The Synthetic Blends. They Yield About The Same Results.
     
  12. Nobody Special

    Nobody Special New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    TN
    I used synthetic in my SUV for a while, then I started thinking. I'm not planning on keeping it forever. I'll probably trade it off between 125,000 and 150,000 miles if not sooner and with today's high quality dino oils, an oil related engine failure isn't likely at all. So I went back to using the Havoline.
     
  13. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    As I have done for the past 50 years... I go by my owners manual for oil change intervals and oil recommendations. I've always used oil that meets or exceeds the API recommendation.
    That has worked for me... never had a major problem with any vehicle!
    I NEVER go by the local dealers recommendation... they are in business to make money by selling service.

    My Avalanche came with a computer system that tells when to change the oil/filter. The owners manual says to change oil/filter by the Oil Life Monitor or in one year.. which ever is first. Mine had 8500 miles on it when the Change Engine Oil message came on. The OM is reset after the oil change then it shows oil life remaining at 100%. That is only 3500 miles further than I normally drive Ford products between oil changes.

    My feelings, if Synthetics were necessary the auto manufacturer would be recommended them.

    From what I read Synthetics are very necessary for racing engines... that counts me out for I don't use my vehicles for racing. ;)

    Same for my boat motors... I go by the owners manual for oil recommendations.

    For anyone interested... A little about the Oil Life Monitor:
    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, San Serif] The development of the Oil-Life System began over a decade ago by researchers Shirley Schwartz and Donald Smolenski, both of the GM Research Laboratories. They discovered, through various investigations, that oil degradation, in general, followed pathways influenced by service and environmental conditions. The extremes of these conditions, as shown in Figure 1, are high-temperature, high-load on one end and low-temperature, low-load on the other. In between is the large operating domain representing the majority of driving conditions. The basic design of the Oil-Life System was intended to characterize extreme operating conditions and most points in between. While the Oil-Life System does not actually monitor any single quality or physical property of the oil, it does incorporate the use of a highly sophisticated mathematical model. This model applies the known influence of oil service temperature and revolutions to characterize the remaining life. The influence of temperature, in particular, has a marked impact on oil life. The almost parabolic nature of the aging rate with temperature emphasizes the importance of this as dependent variable. On the other hand, time or running time (in the absence of mileage or engine revolution data) was not found to be a particularly good indicator of oil life, since it did not adequately distinguish between periods of extended idle and periods when engine speed was high.[/FONT]
     
  14. davesoutfishing

    davesoutfishing New Member

    Messages:
    479
    State:
    Menominee Michigan
    I work in the oil bussiness smell that regular oil after that many miles
     
  15. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    I startd usingsnthecsback in 95 and liked them. What I was told was to use them on a new motor. That an old motor with wear would actualy develop leaks cause the synthetic was finer, if that makes sense. But I know people that use the cheapest oils and have put alot and I mean alot of hours on their engines.