Structure basics

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by onlyriverfish, Sep 16, 2006.

  1. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james

    Been collecting information to better define my waters structure for awhile and thought it makes a good topic. This is my edited version from this site-good read:
    http://www.basspro.com/servlet/catalog.CFPage?mode=article&objectID=30045


    Structure terms:
    • Ledge is the beginning of a distinct change in depth.
    • Hump is a shallow area surrounded by deeper water sometimes called underwater islands.
    • Hole is the inverse of a hump - a deep pocket in the bottom surrounded by shallow water.
    • Cut or Trough are elongated holes.
    • Spine is the inverse of a cut, or trough(elongated hole). Some have fingers running off the sides and their gradient, or slope, will also vary from steep to subtle. Like a hump, spines are surrounded by deeper water, with drops and edges on each of their sides. Long spines can be travel routes for fish as they move towards shore, transitioning from deep to shallow water.
    • Breakline is the edge of a drop. Some describe the different breaks as primary and secondary. The primary breakline is the first sharp drop in depth traveling from shore outward; the secondary following thereafter. The last edge being the channel edge.
    Defining the different structure is just another way of thinking to solve the "Where are the fish today?" puzzle.
     
  2. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    Thats pretty cool! I'll have to better profile my waters too. Good idea and post! Reps to ya!
     

  3. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    Good information:cool2: :big_smile: :cool2:
     
  4. dwreel

    dwreel New Member

    Messages:
    554
    State:
    Southern Pines, NC
    There ya go. "Profile the water you fish". I have always thought people that catch fish consistently just knew the lake profile from years of experience. Which of course is true. Problem is, I haven't got that kind of time left. We are talking about many years of trial and error here.

    What have I been thinking? I've got a boat and a good depth finder, why in the world am I not "profiling the lake?" MAJOR BRAIN FADE. :beat_brick:

    Thanks for jogging my thick head.
     
  5. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james
    Jay,

    Defining the structure with terms using sonar until an accurate mental picture can be drawn of the whole area has helped me in many ways. I find times that the typ. bank anchor position doesnt put my bait where they are feeding within that area and fish there may not come to bait in the time there. Unless I knew that I'd have assumed there were no fish there. I then lost a valuable chance to analize and learn more about thier mood and behavior.

    My abillity to accuratly read the river by just watching surface disturbance is directly proportional to how well I understand the structure below that is causing it. The best presentation to me is when I can read or know a structure location well enough to not disturb it with boat. I do believe the wise old fish are usually spooked by us.

    The more accuratly I can pattern thier structure preference, the more productive fishing time I can have.:smile2:
     
  6. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    boat and bait placement are very important when fishing by sonar .
    if you mark fish and want to catch them in the river with plenty of current then you have to calculate how far up river you need to be when you drop anchor and bait , for example : you mark a spot in 30' of water you want to fish , you pull up stream 90' , drop anchor , feed 60' of rope , then drop your bait lines. if the current pulls your lines at a 45* angle you should be just about on your mark .
    assuming you have the same current as the ohio river. most of the time i have to drop more anchor rope to keep my anchor down on bottom.

    as far as water disturbance , you have to remember the structure on bottom thats causeing the disturbance is up stream from the surface disturbance that you see due to current flow and the depth of water your in .

    you need to take all this information in when hunting these fish , i try to not drop but instead lower my anchor in the water so as not to make any more noise than need be . its bad enuogh the boat is running the water is slapping the boat , you dont want to make a splash from the 20# anchor .

    you need to try and sneak up on the fish you are after .

    thoughts or oppinions welcomed and appreciated
     
  7. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james
    Charles,
    Its interesting here on BOC to read how others allways talk about dropping anchor instead of tying up. On the missouri here most everyone goes to bank, wing dike,etc... to target the fish as rivers average width is 500ft and channel about 1/4 of that.
    Reading that you guys do that has motivated me to do more mid-river searching and anchoring. Value of us sharing here.
    Lifting that anchor gets old though quick.
     
  8. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    yeah and in high current i switch up to my 40# concrete block talk about a work out lol

    my brother and me fish all over the ohio river here at madison indiana i cant recall every tying up lol i assume this means you tie off to the bank .
    we like i said fish all over any where that looks good or marks fish depending on the weather and look of the water , most of the time we try to fish water that most people wont , for instance the barge lane , its dangerous hard to hold in due to the channel , weve had barges go by so close the guys on deck look down in our boat . im not saying its a smart idea to get that close to them but iv done it .

    the river here is more like 500 yrds (not feet )wide or wider the channel sometimes runs over a 100 yards wide (channel refering to deepest part of the river) . out in the middle sometimes in certian places that i fish iv found humps as shallow as 10ft were most of the river depth near it was 30ft also found holes as deep as 52ft were the rest of the bottom was 41ft . theres alot of territory here to cover we have creeks and under water springs ,mountians , cliffs , gravel beds , flats that run for miles with no channel , under ground rivers that i beleive run under the river itself after all ky is cave country . i try to never run the same path on the river more than twice unless im trying to confirm what i already knew to be true of the area . its a big river and i could spend my hole life studying it .
     
  9. Stumpknocker2

    Stumpknocker2 New Member

    Messages:
    650
    State:
    NW FL
    Hey Charles, hypothetically speaking, where are the fish going to be? I am refering to the last comments you made.
     
  10. doughboy

    doughboy New Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    newcomerstown,ohio
    there is some good info here guys keep it coming in becuase i just bought a boat back in May and still trying to figure things out
     
  11. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    for me in the day time the fish are deep , in the holes or at the bottom of ledges . at night they come up to the top of ledges or up on the flats
     
  12. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james
    Have to add another one to that list:
    Point Bar
    Technically called the convex side of a meandor.
    I have allways called it the shallow part of the ISB.