stocking a pond with a few species of fish.

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Bad_fisherman21, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. Bad_fisherman21

    Bad_fisherman21 New Member

    Messages:
    199
    State:
    illinois
    Ok so this pond a few minutes from my home has a lot of gills and bass. I fished there with chicken liver for 1 week strait for about 4 hours at a time to catch 1 10 pound channel a 5 pounder and a 1 pounder. My problem is i wanna make this lake super full with channels, bullheads, and i need an apion on this but if the lake is big enough flatheads. The lake is about the size of a football field. The bullheads are gonna be for when i need bait, the channels and flats for when i need some fun. I would be getting these fish from local rivers,streams, and lakes. My question is this, have any of you ever tried this or done it and if so what where the results of it?
     
  2. Salty1

    Salty1 New Member

    Messages:
    588
    State:
    Mt. Washington, Ky.
    Is this your pond ??? Do you have permission ??????? Too much of one species and not enough of another can absolutely ruin a pond. Flatheads and Blues are not native to ponds but it can be done. Hope this helps some !!!!!!:wink:
     

  3. Tool958

    Tool958 New Member

    Messages:
    508
    State:
    Illinois
    Also, bullheads can take over a pond, especially if it's a small pond. They have to have other bigger fish such as cats, to keep them in check. I'd check with the owner and maybe even the state before trying to change the pond.
     
  4. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    contact your local DNR, they can usually give you directions on how to stock a pond such as you are talking, and to achieve the goal you are trying to reach. they have tables that will tell you what to stock and how much so that you have a productive environment for both your apex predators and their food. this is important so that Bull heads dont take over or so that your flaties dont eat everything in the pond and start feeding on themselves..
     
  5. Catmanblues

    Catmanblues New Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    State:
    S.E Ohio
    A pond big as a football field will have no problems with adding some flattys. At this size I don't believe the bullcats will take much room at all. Good luck on the stocking!
     
  6. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    If there are already bluegills,you dont need bullheads. Also if you dont own the property,You better be carefull of introducing any new species. I would Press charges on anyone doing that to my pond.
     
  7. steveturner024

    steveturner024 Active Member

    Messages:
    825
    State:
    Illinois
    Name:
    Steve Turner
    I would stick with channels and keep the flats away. The flats will eat everything. I don't know much about bull heads. Don't get caught transfering fish it is illegal.
     
  8. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    all i know is that the paylakes stock lots of flats and channels and blues in the same pond and they are usually about the size of a football field. so it can be done and effectively after all they are in business to have people catch a lot of big fish. however you do need to take certain precautions and measures to make sure you have a healthy fish population. contact the DNR as i said and they will give you some info about how many per acre and what not to achieve what you want.

    however like stated, im under the assumption you own or have permission to do this. also it is very illeagle to transfer fish, that is one of the big issue with paylakes and bringing invasive species from one place to another. if you have a good bass pond on your hands and you put a bunch of flatties in it, you will no longer have very many bass. a 40 or 50 lb flattie will demolish a 5 lb bass if he so decides.
     
  9. fishjunky

    fishjunky Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    North Carolina
    I'm not sure where your home waters are, but in NC, the DNR only recommends channel cats for farm ponds. Assuming you have the permission to do any stocking, check with a biologist at your DNR. Also, I would recommend buying fingerlings instead of transfering from one body of water to another.