Spoonbill fish?

Discussion in 'ALL OTHER FISH' started by whiskerchaser, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    I have heard of these fish and seen pictures but how big do they get all the pics i have seen these spoonbills were about 3 or 4 ft long where do they live? what do u use for bait? do they fight good? can u eat them? and exactly what are they? thanks a lot guys im just curious.
     
  2. flatheadmaniac

    flatheadmaniac New Member

    Messages:
    101
    State:
    Missouri
    they get huge dont know that u use bait to catch them ive only heard of snagging them. there sposed to be a great fighter thats all ive heard.
     

  3. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    [​IMG] [SIZE=+2]Spoonbill Catfish[/SIZE] (Polyodon spathula) The spoonbill catfish, also known as the paddle fish, is one of most ancient fish around. They are also one of the oddest looking fish species. Spoonbill catfish are not actually catfish at all as the name implies. Spoonbill Catfish were once endangered but are making a comeback. Spoonbill catfish or paddlefish may have been around for at least 300 million years. Adult spoonbill catfish grow to seven feet long and can weigh as 200 pounds.
    Spoonbill catfish are plankton eaters, they filter zooplankton (microscopic animal life) from fresh waters. To do this Spoonbill catfish swim with their mouths open. Some states allow the harvest of Spoonbill catfish and others don't!
    here is some info
     
  4. whiskerchaser

    whiskerchaser New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    New Mexico
    Thanks guys i was curious.
     
  5. Believer

    Believer New Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    State:
    Greenwood, AR.
    They get very large, over 100 lbs & fight quite well. The only way to catch them is by snagging or in a net.
    They taste great! :big_smile:
     
  6. King of the Shad

    King of the Shad New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Arkansas
    I caught one on a troutline once. His big bill got tangled around the line. Down in arkansas we call um spoonbill catfish, because they have got a body like a catfish and that bill.
     
  7. okiecop

    okiecop New Member

    Messages:
    265
    State:
    Grove, OK
    Here in northeastern Oklahoma alot of people go snagging for spoonbill. It takes some serious takle to do it tho. Say about 10-13 ft. surf rod, a heavy duty reel, atleast 80# test line and a very large weighted treble hook in around the 8 to 10 ought size.

    In fact there is a season for spoonbill here it is during the spring and i believe you are allowed 3 a day during the season and 1 a day the rest of the year. Most of all it is a lot of work but well worth the effort if you land one. just make sure you cut out the red meat on them. after that you can cut them into steaks or just cube them up.

    Great eating no matter what way you go with them tho.
     
  8. fat_fish55

    fat_fish55 New Member

    Messages:
    394
    State:
    illinois
    yep only differencei can see is we use short super stiff rods
     
  9. rudepossum

    rudepossum Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,428
    State:
    Missouri
    snagging sponbill on the Spring River in the spring. You need to see the way you clean spoon bill.
     
  10. Larry Collier

    Larry Collier New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Wagoner, Oklahoma
    Here on Ft Gibson Lake on Oklahoma the locals set snaglines for flats and spoons. Basically it is a trotline but not baited, much tigher and set farther off the bottom. Hmmm - hard to explain!

    Snagging with big rods is great fun. The Dept of Wildlife regs have to be closely followed because there are restrictions on where it is legal to snag with a pole during certain times of year. Almost all of the tailrace water below dams and below the many dams on the navigation channel system are fair game. But, read the regs first to make sure!

    To feed the spoons swim upstream with their bill into the current and flair out those huge gill plates. They filter plankton for food and maybe very small minnows, but anything larger is allowed to pass on through and exit behind the gills. They do not bite baited hooks. Often you can watch the lake surface on a calm day and see a small "V" shaped wake at the surface moving slowly upstream. That's the tip of a spoons bill creating a wake.

    I've cleaned or help clean a few hundred. We usually hang them and cut off the tail to bleed them out. Once they are gutted and skinned your half way there. They have no bones! There is a hollow tube for a backbone that is removed leaving two large slabs of meat. The outer surface of the meat is covered in fat which has to be shaved off leaving the sweet white meat. Using a fillet knife to slice thin layers from the surface is fairly easy. You can cut the slabs into whatever shape you like. Whether strips or cubes just keep the size uniform so they cook evenly and you have some fine table fair!

    Best to Ya

    Larry
     
  11. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Paddlefish are protected in Texas. Of course, snagging is illegal, so that helps, but the fish is consideredt threatened, if not endangered. Construction of dams has hurt the paddlefish, destroying habitat. Texas has a paddlefish stocking program.
     
  12. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    Wow! Thanks for the info! That is awesome! I want one for my aquarium! LOL (not really, It'd never fit)
     
  13. cattinfever999

    cattinfever999 New Member

    Messages:
    426
    State:
    KY
    We usually eat alot of spoonbill. Vernon(vlparrish) snags them. I accidently snagged one while I was reeling in a Zebco. Talk about a fight. Our family loves the meat. So white and I don't have to worry about the kids getting any bones. I like the meat sliced thin, rolled in cornmeal and fried. We have also tried it on a George Foreman, that was good too.

    Vern catches them in the Ohio River, but we have gone to Kentucky Lake near the dam. Snagging season is between Feb.1-May 10 in Kentucky. I'm getting hungry just thinking about it. Might have to see if there's any in the freezer. :smile2:
     
  14. Flintman

    Flintman New Member

    Messages:
    710
    State:
    OKC, OKLA.
    Here In Okla, I Snag For Bills Below Kaw Dam, Near Ponca City, Ok.
    I Use A 15 Ft. Custom Rod With A Quantum, White Shark, Spinning
    Reel, But I Only Use 3o # Line. I've No Trouble Gettin In Some Good Ones.

    My Wife Is 5ft 2 In. And 110 # You Should Of Seen Her Reel In A 40#, On A 15 Ft Rod.
    I Have Some Pic I'll Post If I Can Find Them.

    When You Clean A Spoonbill, Its Like Cleaning A Hog, They Are Loaded With Fat.
    Fat, Greasy, Stuff Surronds The Meat.
    Clean The Fat Out And Theres Some Good Eatin.
     
  15. Believer

    Believer New Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    State:
    Greenwood, AR.
    I'd love to see the pics! :big_smile:
     
  16. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
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    I've never caught one but I hear they're making a comeback in the Ky River, even up here above lock 10. Bigmouth Buffalo are plankton eaters also but every now and then they'll take a baited hook.

    I seen a huge slab for sale at Charlie's Fish Market in Lexington last year, meat looked really good. If I see it again I'm gonna try it.