spinning versus baitcasting

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by scoremaster, Oct 28, 2007.

  1. scoremaster

    scoremaster New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    western maryland
    just wondering why you fellas prefer one over the other other than personal preferance .
    what i mean is what are the upsides of the baitcasters compared to the spinning reels sorry for the dumb question but anything unknown is best asked about .

    thanks,
    Scott
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I don't think your really going to find a difference, other than personal preference and/or personal beliefs. I use both types of reels, depending upon what I am doing. I have some rigged up as ultra-lights and others in the mid-range, and others for the big boys. I find I can put more line on the spinning reels, and generally I get a little more distance when I cast. But, I love my abu's and the spinning equipment usually take a back seat. No reason, really, just preference. I must truthfully admit I have about a 4 to 1 odds in favor of bait casting reels, but I have 6 or 7 spinning reels also. Lets just say when I pass on, my kids are not going to have to buy much in the line of fishing equipment. LOL
     

  3. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    I hear baitcasters have more power to them like a winch, to be able to haul in fish out of the thick stuff. I only use spinning gear which works for me since i only can chase channel cats round these parts. Now if I was down south where the cats grow big....... maybe I'd be willing to work on my birdnesting technique.
     
  4. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    They both have there places when fishing. As for catfishing there's nothing like a bait casting reel. It takes to big of a spinning reel to hold the amount of line and to have the drag system when going after big cats.
     
  5. cook

    cook New Member

    Messages:
    1,494
    State:
    Plattsburg,Mo.(near K.C.)
    I also think with a baitcaster,you can control the fish with more authority since the line plays out on top of the rod vs.a spinning reel where it hangs underneath.
     
  6. Zebco 33

    Zebco 33 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Illinois
    I just got my first baitcaster a cople of days ago. I'm along time spinning user. But then I mostly panfish and use a light to ultralight actions for them. In fact the only reason I finally got a baitcaster was I couldn't find any spinning reels big enough for what I was wanting to use them for, catfish.

    I work midnights, so I had ALOT of time to think about either a baitcaster or a mail order spinning reel. This is the "list" of pros and cons that I put together....

    1)Availaiblity. I can get all kinds of good to great baitcasting reels from Wally World and their all important LAYAWAY program, the blessing to a working father of three! I've been able to travel a little and see some better spinning reels, but none was big enoigh to handle at least 200 yards of 12-15 pounds test mono that I had as my baseline for a cat rig. I would have to mail order.

    2)Cost. This ment more to me than ALMOST anything else. I Picked up a Wally World Abu Garcia 6000 Ambassadeur w/baitclicker and a decent rod for $67 dollars. I could have gotten just the reel for $59. Or a 7000 series reel for $90, and the 5000 was only $50. All of these are made in SWEDEN not CHINA. And they are concidered the stuff cat rigs are made of. The spinning reel that came the closest IMHO was the Shimano BaitRunner series and they started at $120 without shipping. Penn had a couple of nice models at around $75, but they did not have good enough reviews or features for me. I think the Penns averaged around 3 stars out of 5 with a limited amount of reviews, but the Abu Garcias were a constant 5 out of 5 with several reviews.

    3)Reliability. Face it, baitcasters wins hands down. Abu Garcias are almost legendary with both cat and bass fishermen. Or as one bass fisherman explianit to me, "I can put any one of my baitcasters on a cat rod and go to the river or Rend and fight large flatheads all day and all night long. Then place that same reel on a bass rod and fish a tornament all day. I can't do that with a spinning reel, cause the larger size needed for cats wouldn't be worth a hoot for bass."

    4)User Friendly. Both are intimadating, but both can be learned. It took the same amount of time for me to be able to use a spinning or baitcasting reel. The baitcaster "feels" normal to me, but I use spincast reel alot also with the kids. And I feel a younger angler would be able to use a baitcaster easier than a spinner, if they are use to a spincaster. When I was practicing in the yard wiht my baitcaster, both of my daughters were able to reel it in and the oldest even casted it a few times without any problems. I got out my medium action spinning outfit, and they kept wanting to turn it over and reel or just got back to thier 33s. Neither wanted anyting to do with the "funny" reel.

    5)Design. I like the baitcaster's low profile and the way the line is lower and more inline with the rod. I do not like the spinning's underrod platform for big fish. It is great for lighter tackle and is well balanced, but once I go heavy, I noticed its a chore casting and whatnot.

    I picked the baitcaster because I think it is a better buy, easier to locate in my area, will hold up better, and just "feels" better than a spinning outfit of the same size.

    A note to all who read this......I've fished since I was a little kid. How I was raised and what I fished for and the environment I fished in all added to how I choose my gear. So my reason are my own and I force them on noone. I enjoy everyone's input and help noone gets physically hurt reading mine. I am a newbie when it comes to buying catfish only gear. Most of the time we just grabbed the heaviest lined outfit we had and headed to water after dark and the work was done. But these are the guidelines I used to pick out my gear and tackle. Good luck with yours.

    Jerry
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Spinning reels are definitely easier to learn to use than casting reels, so that can be a plus for them. But historically, casting equipment has been heavier than spinning equipment, mainly because it becomes difficult to cast when using heavy mono. The heaver the mono, the stiffer it is, and the greater tendency to take a set, coil, and twist. Greater diameter mono also has a big effect on casting distance. I've always felt that 30# mono was about the upper limit on the test of the mono I wanted to mess with, and I really didn't like to use anything heavier than 20#. So, any fishing for larger fish required the use of casting equipment. But, braided superline has changed all that. You can spool your spinning reel with 50# braided superline and it only has the diameter of about 15# mono. So, as long as you have a reel with a good enough drag system, and a rod to match, you can use spinning tackle right alongside the guys fishing for the bigguns using casting equipment. Oh yeah, I've got 20# braided on a smaller reel for skipjack; it's the same diameter as 6# mono, and casts as well as 6# mono without the coils and twisting. Love it!
     
  8. Bacardipr05

    Bacardipr05 New Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    Its always been spinning gear for me. I did buy a bait caster in which i intend to learn how to use one day. Zebco has a point a higher qualilty spinning reel will cost more thant a good quality baitcaster on average. Why is this I am not really sure ? I never thought the need of a bait caster until a recent outing for big blue fish. After seen these guys hit like a train and pull like a tractor. I thought to myself geez maybe there is something to this bait casting equipment. I wondered how would i do about winching one of these tenacious guys in. I wanted to test the the theory out but the mate suggested on me not using my gear because i only had 17lb test on it at the time. I know the drag would of held as my reel has about 20lb of drag on it. There are spinning reels with even higher drags ratings than this. There are moderate size spinning reels with drags twice as much as that. Of course they come at a hefty premium. There have been many big fish caught on spinning gear. There was a large Sailfish caught on a little Shimano Sustain 4000 (i believe). There is a video of someone landing a huge, huge Wels cat on a Shimano twinpower reel. I emailed the gentleman and asked him if the reel held up. He replied with a yes works just like before with no problem. Well i stop writting know the rest is up to you. :wink:
     
  9. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    I pefer to use baitcasting reels, because they can use heavy line.
     
  10. Zebco 33

    Zebco 33 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Illinois
    Jerry and Angel both make very good points that blows the air out of my "list". And I will backtrack and say that your decision has to do with the size of fish you are after. If you are like me, who go after the mortal sized channels and flats, than a good spinning reel filled with 10-12# test will allow you to fill your creel. And I would make sure you use a very good limp line, for the reasons Jerry stated. Anything large, then I think your are looking in baitcasting area, just because of the extra money that you would have to spend on a spinning reel to get the needed umph.

    And I agree on what Angel said, you can catch a larger fish on lighter gear. Now if you are fishing JUST for larger fish, then I would say no. But I've landed six pound bass and five pound channels on ultra/mirco light gear when I was fishing for crappie in the spring. I don't go out with mirco gear to catch them, but its fun every now and then.

    Jerry
     
  11. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Yes, some big fish have been caught on spinning gear--and on Zebco 33s. In open water where the angler could play the fish a long time without it wrapping the line around a snag. But if you use light tackle around snags, rocks, logs, etc., and you hang a fish 15#-20# or larger, I'll give you good odds that you will lose it. What do I call 'light tackle'? Any rig using 20# test line or lighter. I rod & reel fish too many places where letting a fish run 10' means it's lost. And some places where 50# line is light. I've seen some big Penn 309 reels spooled with 50# mono get every bit of the line taken out, then POW! when the line broke. When deciding on what kind and weight of rig you are going to use on a particular trip, you need to consider the size fish you want to be able to bring in, whether or not you will be able to play the fish or have to 'horse' it in before it gets hung up, casting distance, whether you're in a boat, and can possible chase the fish if it heads downstream, or if you're fishing from shore, and may need to fight both fish and current. Then too, sometimes it's a matter of deciding whether you want the fun of playing the smaller fish and taking the chance of losing any big one that hits, or using heavy tackle, which doesn't get maximum fun out of the smaller fish, but will handle the big ones. That's a matter of personal preference.
     
  12. Pirate Jerry

    Pirate Jerry New Member

    Messages:
    613
    State:
    Yulee Florida
    Personal preference !! If you don't have faith in your equipment you won't be able to use it. Watch the TV tournaments, it used to be the only reels you saw were Bait casters, now spinning reels are showing up everywhere. I have caught redfish to over 30 pounds, black drum to 50 pounds and sharks to over 200 pounds on heavy spinning gear. The rod is as important as the reel. You should never "winch" a fish in. You have to pump the rod and take in line on the down stroke. With the Drag set correctly for the strength of the line the reel is basically used to store the line during a fight. Casting is a different matter, spinning gear matched to the bait or lure will normally get you more distance. Baitcasters win hands down when drift fishing large baits. personal preference !!!
     
  13. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    I agree that the gear you choose has a lot to do with how you grew up and what type of fishing you are doing, but i think it also has to do with geography. i've noticed around here that the norm is spinning rigs, with baitcasting type outfits used for bass fishing and trolling. I personally do not own a baitcasting rod, but have "tried" to use a couple. I need more practice to become efficient with one. I use spinning rods for everything from striped bass to panfish. My "saltwater" rod is a 6' Medium ugly stick with whatever cheap Shakespear spinning reel came on it from walmart. Spooled with 30# mono, it works great for catfish, striped bass etc. My other rod is a lightweight spinning rig that i bass fish and panfish with. The point is, i've caught all species around here on spinning outfits. I'm sure others have done the same with baitcasters. Its all personal preference, and of course if you select the right equipment (ie. heavy or light rods, the right size line) for the species you are fishing, you have a hard time going wrong with either. The only time this doesn't hold true is deep sea fishing. They have a hard time making spinning reels heavy enough to hold up to the way the line pulls on it, making the baitcaster type reel better because it pulls directly on the drum.
     
  14. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,457
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Spinning reels are for wimps who cast like girls and aren't smart enough to use a proper reel.
    Casting reels are for poser tackle whores who want to look cool and like they know what they are doing even if they don't.

    I guess that would make me all of the above!

    It's all about personal preference and the particular situation you are in. Use what you are comfortable with and buy the best you can afford.
    As for pro's and cons, I would say that when it comes to the bigger cat tackle you can get a quality casting reel for less money than a quality spinning reel. Good spinners seem disproportionately expensive to me although they do have more internal parts...W
     
  15. Zebco 33

    Zebco 33 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Illinois
    +1 on everything you posted!
    My wife's grandpa had one rod and reel, a Mitchell 300, and he is a legend around here to fishermen. He would just use a lighter or heavier leader, conntected to his ten pound mono, depending on the fish he was after. I wouldn't ask him to even look at a baitcaster.

    Jerry
     
  16. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    If you do use spinning tackle and light mono line for big fish, there are a couple of things you need to be aware of. First, if the fish takes out a lot of line, you probably need to back off on your drag. Unlike a casting reel, line spooling off a spinning reel has to go over a 'lip'; the larger the lip, the greater drag it causes. Add the drag from the lip to the drag from your drag system, and you might break off your line. Second, if a fish makes a big long run, watch out for it turning left or right. We seldom think about it, but line going through the water sideways creates a lot of drag. Again, add this drag to the drag from your reel, and the line may snap. The first thing to do on a long run like that is to hold the rod as high above your head as possible to keep line out of the water. Then if you think it necessary, you can back off on your drag. The lighter the line, the more this is a problem. I know of instances where the drag of 6# test mono created enough drag to snap the line, even though the bail on the spinning reel was open. I'll admit that this is more of a problem with some other fish than catfish, but if you happen to get hold of a big striper while catfishing....well.
     
  17. Bacardipr05

    Bacardipr05 New Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    I wanna get a hold of a big striper while catfishing.:wink: I have been targeting a little lately but nada. The very thing you mentioned about "drag in the water" was experienced when I hooked up with a large carp. I saw the water been "cut" by my line 14lb test at the time. The good thing this gave me a heads up in what direction the fish was heading. It was kinda of kool looking in a way. By the way roller bearings help out in that instance.
     
  18. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    There is no better reel than the one the fisherman trusts and is experienced with, be it a spinning reel or a baitcaster. Either style reel will effectively catch fish and big fish. Granted some reels are built with more quality and better parts than others. I hear alot of guys saying that a good spinning reel is higher priced than a good baitcaster, but I don't see it that way. I have a Daiwa Opus 6000 that I gave $40 for at BPS. It has a large line capacity and really good gear ratio for horseing the bigguns. The first week I had it I landed a 45 pound blue on it. IMO it is as good as any 6000, 7000 ABU and holds just as much line. That said I have 8 catfish rods on my boat, four are baitcasters and four are spinning reels. I would trust any one of them to handle a fifty pounder and a few of them have. I do have two of my baitcasters, 209 Penns spooled with 50lb mono, the rest are spooled with 30 pound mono. Vern
     
  19. Brando

    Brando New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    Louisville, Kentucky
    I haven't taken the time yet to learn how to use a baitcaster, so I'm still all spinning reels. I bought a CM90 from BPS two weeks ago and I have it spooled up with quite a bit of 40 lb. mono, so I really don't fear running to the end of the spool. Not to mention that it has quite a big of chug-a-lug to it, as well as a reel handle that you can adjust the diameter of cranking circle you greate to where a tiny circle completes the revolution to really pull line fast, or you can reel it in with a giant, wide circle to have more control over how much line you are pulling in all with no adjustments needed. Just change your hand position.

    Maybe one day I'll go to a baitcaster. Maybe not. If I need to I won't hesitate to change my gear over, but I haven't needed to yet. I think that would be a GREAT thing to need, though. That would mean I'm catching some monster kitties!
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Brandon, if you'll take off enough of that mono to put on, say, 150 yards of braided superline, I think you'll be amazed at the increase in your casting distance, and with the sensitivity of the braided line.