Spinning/Casting Rod difference?

Discussion in 'Fishing Rod Review' started by slimepig, Mar 17, 2006.

  1. slimepig

    slimepig New Member

    Messages:
    666
    State:
    Kerrville Texas
    ok only difference i see in spinning and casting rods is the first eye on the spinning is larger i guess to accomodate the line unwinding off the spool rather than rolling off like a baitcasting reel. I guess thats why you wouldnt use a spinning reel on a casting rod, but I have used a baitcasting reel on a spinning rod for years! any other differences?
     
  2. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    In terms of rod action, there is not difference. A rod blank is a rod blank. In using a "conventional/baitcasting" reel on a spinning rod you may have found that your line rubbed on the blank when under load because the guide spacing is usually quite different. On a spinning rod - with a spinning reel - there is no chance that the line will hit the rod so spacing is usually a bit wider.

    Casting rods, under many circumstances, have a trigger grip reel seat as well, where the spinning rod doesn't. That's not a hard and fast rule though. Most casting rods I put together for myself have a standard spinning reel seat because I'm not doing a lot of one-handed casting. This is common on heavier casting rods.

    /Scott
     

  3. Spencer_Blanton

    Spencer_Blanton New Member

    Messages:
    115
    State:
    Franklin, Ohio
    Is this a matter of the rod or the reel?

    Rodwise, looking at the 75# bluecat video, I don't see the little trigger on the rods mounted on the back of the boat. To me, and I intend to try this myself, it looks like a bait cast reel on a spin cast rod.

    I've always used spincast reels and even have surf rod & reel setups for catfish. It seems that almost everyone here uses baitcast reels. Is that because of a matter of a superior drag or higher wieght line capacity? I am new to getting serious about cats, so I would appreciate some insight as well.

    Spencer
     
  4. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    The misslead conception that casting rods all have a trigger grip on them is wrong. I have 1 that has one and 15 more that don't. And I assure you that that rod in the rodholder in that boat is not a spinning rod, DH doesn't use them at all.

    And as for puting a baitcaster on a spinning rod, You can but the backbone will be on the wrong side of the rod and the eyes will roll over to the side under a strain.
     
  5. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Very few heavier rods have a trigger grip. Those that have the trigger are the lighter rods where one-handed casting is common. A lot of guys ask for trigger grips for a casting rod, thinking that's it is required. Definitely not. If you use 2 hands to cast you will not notice a difference.

    /Scott
     
  6. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Actually, the spine/backbone has no impact on whether or not the guides twist under strain. Twisting is caused due to the fact that the guides are on top of the blank. Because of this all casting rods are unstable and actually put some stress on the fisherman. I build my own rods with a spiral wrap where the guides transition from top to bottom as they progress to the tip. This eliminates twist and reduces the strain.
    Here's a pic of one:
    http://www.catfish1.com/gallery/showimage.php?i=577&c=6&userid=153

    /Scott
     
  7. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Actually, when a fishing rod is built, the builder of quality rods will "roll" the blank, to find the natural curve. If building a baitcaster, the guides will go on top, spinning on the bottom. This will also affect the line rating of a rod. Most of your cheaper rods claim to use a line weight of, say 8 to 20 pounds, when in reality, there is only one perfect line for any givin rod. To detrimine the actual ideal line size, you attach your (colored builders line, works best)line to a scale and a stationary object, move back about 30 feet, hold butt of rod at 45 degree angle, and pull back until tip is at a 45 to the backbone of rod. Have a friend read the scale. Multiply by 3 and that should be the ideal line for that rod. I hope I got this right:eek: lmao! Tight Lines! Anyway, if your guides are not in-line with the backbone of the rod, it changes the rating of the rod!
    One more thing, when you buy a rod, examine them closely (no two exactly the same), because the mass produced ones are far from carefully and skill fully built! Would you go through all that for 75 cents a day:confused:
     
  8. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Actually......that's not true. The best rod builders know that the spine is irrelevant. They build on the "natural curve" of the blank. That is a fallacy that has floated around for years and folks have a very very hard time getting over.

    Happy customers are number one. Hand them a custom that looks crooked and they'll hand it back and say "no thanks".

    It's nice to have a perfectly straight blank so that spine can be considered, but those blanks are hard to come by. I started out spining blanks just like most other builders - then I started paying attention to what "the best" were saying about the effects and realized they were right. Performance improvements from placing the guides on or under the spine are negligible and honestly CANNOT be measured by hand. It would take expensive measurement equipment to do it.

    I'm not just talking out of my "you know what". Dr. William Hanneman devised a system for measuring the power of a rod - any rod - using pennies as a weight "standard". Pennies were used because their weight is consistent and they are available to anyone that wished to use the system. It is called the "Common Cents" system. Do a web search and you will find it. Using that system, it can be proven that changing the orientation of the spine has a negligible effect on the power of the rod.

    Rods don't have an ideal "line rating" they have an ideal "weight range" that they are capable of handling. This is measurable using common cents. Most of the info is related to measuring the "Instrinsic Power" of a fly rod, but there is a formula to convert the measurement (in number of cents required to deflect the rod blank a certain distance) to weight capacity in ounces.

    Just search for "common cents". It's good reading and an eye opener.

    We're in changing times - old practices die hard :rolleyes:

    /Scott
     
  9. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    The shortest distance between 2 points is a straight line. I would be willing to bet that that twist in the eyes of that rod will cut down casting distance and cause some major friction on the retrieve. This system may work for you but I wouldn't take a chance on it myself.
     
  10. bigfish

    bigfish New Member

    Messages:
    432
    State:
    Dunbar WV.
    looks weird to me, dont think i would like to fish with it, but if it works for you thats all that matters.
     
  11. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    The effect on casting distance is small. In fact, it isn't even a factor when not casting for distance. I don't use this layout on surf rods where max casting distance is important, though I intend to experiment with it one day.

    There is no friction at all on the retrieve. In fact, I don't even use that little guide that keeps the line off of the blank as it moves from top to bottom anymore. I've learned it has no impact. I just make a wrap of thread on the blank where the line rubs and coat it with permagloss. Works like a charm.

    It does look very wierd and often draws questions. :blink: Guys don't like it at first glance on the shelf so they wont buy. This is why commercial manufacturers don't market them.

    The spiral wrap has to be demo'd. It's got to be put in the fisherman's hands to convince them. Those that have given it a shot - LOVE IT - and won't go back.

    /Scott