Something Different For Cold Weather

Discussion in 'The BOC Diner' started by plumbertom1, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. plumbertom1

    plumbertom1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,902
    State:
    Eugene, Or.
    For those of you that have never experianced this Mexican soup.

    Sopa de Albondigas

    This Mexican meatball soup was a family favorite growing up. Not an appetizer, always a main course, either for lunch or dinner. "Albondigas" means "meatballs" in Spanish, and the trick to perfect albondigas soup is to put chopped mint leaves into the meatballs. The mint is what gives an albondigas soup meatball its unique flavor.

    Preparation time: 1 hour.

    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 large onion, chopped
    1 large garlic clove, minced
    1/2 cup of tomato sauce
    3 quarts of chicken stock or beef stock OR water OR a mixture of both (we usually use half stock half water as the meatballs will create their own stock)

    2 large carrots, sliced (I like extra carrots)
    1/2 lb of string beans, cut into 1 inch pieces

    1 pound ground beef
    1/3 cup of raw white rice
    1 raw egg
    1/2 cup of chopped fresh mint leaves and/or parsley
    1 1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper

    1/1/2 cup of frozen or fresh peas
    Dried oregano, crumbled
    Salt and pepper
    1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

    1 Heat oil in heavy medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and minced garlic and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add tomato sauce and broth mixture. Bring to boil and simmer. Add carrots and string beans.

    2 Prepare meatballs. Mix rice into meat, adding mint and parsley leaves, salt and pepper. Add raw egg. Form beef into 1-inch meatballs.

    3 Return soup to gentle simmer. Add meatballs to soup, one at a time. Cover and let simmer for 1/2 hour. Add peas towards the end of the 1/2 hour. Add a few pinches of oregano and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Garnish soup with chopped fresh cilantro.

    Serves 6-8.

    Cilantro is one herb that you either love it or hate it. I feel it's an essential part of Mexican food and it must be fresh.
    If you don't care for it you can substitute parsley but you will loose the true Mexican flavor.

    Now I prefer my sopa to be a little on the spicy side so if you do also you can add 3 or 4 chopped fresh jalapeno or serrano (warning to the inexperienced with Mexican peppers, serrano peppers are much hotter than jalapenos) peppers depending on which you like.

    Enjoy.
     
  2. Reel_Blues

    Reel_Blues New Member

    Messages:
    824
    State:
    Virginia
    Man thats sound good im gunna make some thanks for your post.
     

  3. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Yep, yep, I'm for sure going to making some of THAT. I can surmise from the ingredients that I will love it. Thank you Tom! :big_smile:

    I do have a ? however. Regular long-cooking white rice? I assume that's what you mean by raw.
     
  4. plumbertom1

    plumbertom1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,902
    State:
    Eugene, Or.
    I ment uncooked.
    I always use quick rice but I don't know if it would make any difference.
     
  5. john catfish young

    john catfish young New Member

    Messages:
    3,070
    State:
    Kentucky
    That sounds awesome...thanks for the recipe
     
  6. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Tom ,that sounds mighty good ,all the way down to the 'Mint? I cant even Imagine putting things like mint,ginger ,and some herbs or spices with meat. I do like the other ing. and I will be makin some in the future ,I know I'm strange ,but I cant stand the thought of it ,sorta like eatin earthworms for me.:smile2:
     
  7. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Sounds like some mity fine vittles ya got heah. I'll be tryin this out soon. Thanks
     
  8. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

    Messages:
    13,546
    Well try it, who knows? I thought the same thing, I'm just not a mint fan either. Ginger, fresh ginger root, is good with all kinds of meat/poultry/seafood IMO. It's a lot different than ground ginger, like you put in baked goods. You can substitute ground for fresh in a pinch though. Fresh grated ginger root has a lemon peppery taste to me. Why would it be like eatin' earthworms? :eek:oooh:

    I'm gonna try it with the mint. I might not put that much in the first time, but it seems like these ingredients would probably meld well together. Heck, I don't think Tom's family would've been eatin' it all these years if it wasn't good. Ruth ever heard of it?

    Glad you agree with the cilantro bro. :wink: