Some help with shad.

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by catchinghogs, Sep 2, 2006.

  1. catchinghogs

    catchinghogs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,558
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    A couple of questions about shad. I went fishing the other day for some hybrid white bass with shiners. I fished behind a power plant with a warm water outlet there was thousands of shad in the water they were all very small about an inch or two. The fish were all at the surface and some were getting caught on an I beam off the wall and i was grabbing them and using them everyone I used got a hit caught some channels and bass. I was just wandering how long does it take for these shad to grow would like to catch some with a net and freeze them but right now they are the size of big minows.
     
  2. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    You can use them that size you just may want to put 3-6 on your hook depending on the size of hook you use. If you freeze them I would salt them pretty good before doing so, It will help them to not get as mushy.
     

  3. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james
    Only problem I have had with these little guys is that cats tend to pick at them rather then hammer them:sad2: I find them better used for working up the food chain to get skippies. Pinch head off and use head only.
    Im still gonna use them at differnt times as they may work good for me then.
     
  4. bluesbrother

    bluesbrother New Member

    Messages:
    429
    State:
    texas
    i freeze them somtimes i just put them in like half quart freezer bags no water and freeze them they work well,good luck
     
  5. onlyriverfish

    onlyriverfish Member

    Messages:
    319
    State:
    Nebraska
    Name:
    james
    Robert,
    A friend showed me once how to freeze catfish meat by suspending in water and freezing flat so meat freezes with water all around it. Prevents freezer burn (any woman would prob have known this, but I was oblivious). Maybe you already do that. Wonder if bait would last better that way too?

    I been meaning to buy a vacuum sealer for storing bait for winter, but my wife tosses my bait when she see's it in freezer so have to buy anyother freezer too I guess:sad2:
     
  6. kingkat

    kingkat New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    nc
    I freeze my shad in water an try to rotate it out by date an if after winter is over if I have any left. I grind it up for chum
     
  7. ka_c4_boom

    ka_c4_boom New Member

    Messages:
    2,252
    State:
    Bedford,Ky
    their size will double in less than a week , theres some on here who have kept them alive in a tank for several months . you can also freeze them theres info on here some where bout doin that . i personally try to use fresh bait when ever posible , shad only run certian times of the year other times i use skipjacks and chubs , blue gill and crawfish all natural bait . enjoy them while you can . good luck
     
  8. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    The small shad you're seeing now are the young of the year (just hatched this spring) - this is the time of year you start finding them in huge schools. So considering they were about 1/4" long just a few months ago, you can assume they grow pretty fast.

    The big shad are still out there, you just may have to wade through a bunch of tiny ones first.

    As for freezing them, I almost never bother anymore -- fresh bait will outperform frozen bait every time, and I'd rather spend an extra hour throwing the net than sitting for hours with no bites or fewer than I'd get from fresh bait.

    I'm a bit fanatical I suppose, but at this point I almost never use any shad other than fresh cut live shad -- I use a Grayline bait tank to keep them alive in; when I need bait, I pluck one out and slice him up. You know its fresh when the chunk twitches as you stick it on the hook.

    If you're going to freeze them, you should transfer them straight from the throw net into a ziplock bag and get them on ice while they're still alive. Never let them die in a bucket of water and never dump them directly on ice. Once you get a bag full, seal it up and put it in the freezer. Take them out and let them thaw over time - they should still be plenty firm and should bleed when you cut them.

    But instead of worrying about how to keep them, learn to be proficient with the cast net and insist on using fresh bait for every trip. You really will have much better results.