Sod

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by gargoil77, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    I'm planning on making my garden bigger. But I need to take some sod up. Without renting a sod cutter, what are the easiest ways to take up sod. I don't mind hard work, but I've got so much going on that I can't spend alot of time out there like I have done.
    I have tilled my garden for several hrs. My mother-in-law visited one year and I spent about 5 1/2 hrs tilling. My garden was really small too. like 10x16 then. But i couldn't stand to be inside that house. I think when the police stopped by at 10:30 pm and told me that someone complained about the noise I figured the garden was ready to be planted.
    But anyway, back to the sod. I have a rear tine tiller and I found out the hard way that you can't till fresh yard.
     
  2. gardengrz

    gardengrz New Member

    Messages:
    899
    State:
    wakeman,ohio
    the best thing to do is see if you can find a farmer or someone with a plow. when you plow the sod over like that, it rots and turns into good mulch. your tiller should be able to break it up after its been plowed. good luck
     

  3. gardengrz

    gardengrz New Member

    Messages:
    899
    State:
    wakeman,ohio
    10x16 aint very big tho, you could consider a box garden. take r.r. ties and make a square, then fill with mulch and topsoil.
     
  4. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Check out bio intensive gardening. For a space that size you can grow way more then you could with rows, and weeding can be basicly non exsistant! There are a hundred other reasons I use that method
    Intensive gardening might not be for every one, but it sure is worth taking a few moments to check it out!
     
  5. Hootowlc3

    Hootowlc3 New Member

    Messages:
    409
    State:
    Florida
    I made the mistake of tilling under grass. Never could keep the grass out of that spot.
    Water it real good then cover with black plastic for about a month. Should kill all the grass and seeds, then till under.
     
  6. kspor

    kspor New Member

    Messages:
    716
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I suggest you check into square foot gardening. Never till or dig up ground again. Just enter Square foot garden into your search engine. I love mine and the yields are great. The book is inexpensive and has great tips. I am amazed at how much I grow in a small space. Soil conditions are never a concern.

    Good luck
     
  7. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    I am a member of Urban Harvest located out of Houston, Texas. They have a website and local library for anyone living around Houston that want to grow organic produce in raised beds. I produced their fund raising gala video last year and it shows one of the most succesful "Urban" raised bed gardners and a well established farm out of the city limits growing organically in raised beds as well as traditional plowed rows with organic feeding methods.

    We sell at their farmers market on Saturdays throughout the spring and summer months.

    There are many ways to garden. I am old school so for my field garden I still use a tractor and plow to turn the soil, a disc to break and level, then a tiller to "soften and lift" a 4' row for deep planting, trench planting or to make hills for squash, melons, etc. I have a small raised bed close to the house for herbs. Once the garden is up and running I have a walk behind tiller to work the rows for weeds and to loosen soil for adding to hills, etc. This is relaxing as ya get to see all the plants up close and monitor growth.

    We transplant from the greenhouse and feed the root ball of every plant to get a solid root set. I generally do not feed pepper plants anything else for the entire season. All other veggies I re-feed or "side dress" with organic fertilizer as they start producing. When the crops are turned under I add additional organic matter and replenish the soil for the next growing season.
     
  8. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Another good source for raised bed or deep bed gardening is "How To Grow More Vegetables" 6TH Edition
    by John Jeavons
    Imho it is the Bible on how to get the most vegitables out of a small space! His methods are used around the world and are built on principles thousands of years old. John Jeavons has done more to end world hunger then most "Charities"! I also have the book kent was talking about and it is excelent also!
     
  9. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Thanks for all the tips guys. Now I have to decide what I want to do.
     
  10. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    i was gonna say get under it with a flat shovel and remove. lol. ya said ya didn't mind hard work,lol. i like the black plastic idea. that would work. a jon boat works well too. i got a 10'x2' area re seeded to prove it too. lmao.
     
  11. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Jeremy I did the shovel thing last year when I extended the garden I used to have. I loved that garden. Had it for the last 12 or 13 yrs. Don't have it anymore due to my ex wife. :crying: Anyway i don't need to go there. Thats why I want to try somethng easier.:)
     
  12. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    thx for the link delta!

    i have covered my garden in black plastic since 1980 or so. i like not having to weed and the soil stays moist. plants seam to grow well too. i just have to add compost to the plant areas also. pulling the plastic at the end of the season sucks a bit though. lol
     
  13. zappaf19

    zappaf19 New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Monticello,IN
    Spray it with round up and wait a week. Till.
    Bill
     
  14. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Wouldn't the roundup stay in the soil for a long time? That wouldn't be good for the plants.
     
  15. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    NC
    Mark,
    Round up doesn't affect plants that you put in after spraying. Round up is taken into the plant roots through the foilage and stems, not through the soil.
    (That is not to say that I would pour Roundup on the soil and expect nothing to be affected, but its meant as a spray anyway...lol)
    Adding just a tad of liquid dishsoap to the sprayer of roundup really helps it too.
    I have used Roundup to spray planned garden/flower bed areas for years and then tilled them up after a week or so. Works great.

    Also, if you don't want to weed, a great alternate to putting plastic down is to use 3 to 4 sheet thicknesses of newspaper, covered over with clean(seedless) straw, grass clippings, compost, etc. Then in winter just till it all in. Great conditioner for the garden for the following season.
     
  16. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Well I guess I'll try the round up. It seems that would be the easiest. I'll try the newspapers too. Thanks guys.
     
  17. waterwalker

    waterwalker New Member

    Messages:
    604
    State:
    Louisville Ohio
    You can use many chemicals to do the job, I would suggest Pronto Big
    and Tuff, you can get in at TSC, I use it to keep out weeds under my
    my chain link fence and use it in our mulched beds. It also becomes non toxic sooner than Round up. Obviously you are not an organic gardner
    and there is nothin wrong with that, the reason I mentioned it, there is
    another product available that I use, it is 2-4 D, this I use between the
    rows of corn, it really does a good job keeping out weeds, as with all
    chemicals read the instructions carefully.