Snagging Spoonbills?

Discussion in 'ALL OTHER FISH' started by Gone Fishin', Jan 22, 2007.

  1. Gone Fishin'

    Gone Fishin' New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    Missouri
    Found a great place for spoonies at LOZ but I have never fished for them before. I heard the best way is to snag them. I understand what that is but how do I go about it. What it is the best rig or setup. Would like to give it a try this spring. Any suggestions?
    Kevin
     
  2. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Depending on the current I use a 10 to 16 ounce bank sinker weight tied on the bottom of the line. I then tie on three 10/0 treble hooks every 24 inchs above the weight. This will give you a hook at 2 feet, 4 feet and 6 feet above the weight. I see a lot of people out there that snag all day and they will catch fish but you will be wore out pretty fast. I have learned a method by watching my electronics where I see there is a spoonbill on the screen and then we will snag around 6 or 7 times. Depending on how much line you have out after a 1/2 dozens times of snagging you have passed them any way if you don't hit them. Saves a lot of sore arms. You will need a big reel that can handle plenty of line and a m/h to heavy rod. I use Penn baitcasters with 80 lb. braided dacron as it has no stretch and you will get better hook up than the mono lines.
    Hope this helped.
     

  3. cumberlandcat

    cumberlandcat Active Member

    Messages:
    1,161
    State:
    Tennessee
    We in tennessee only get a month outa the year to snag em so I don't know about there but I would look at the book.
     
  4. J.BENKE

    J.BENKE New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    murray, KENTUCKY
    i snag under the ky dam and in ky we can only fish with one treble hook legaly, but its still a blast, especially if its warm and all the spoonbill are runnin real shallow and then its all about sight fishin. so be sure to take your polorized sun-glasses
     
  5. SkiMax

    SkiMax Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    also, check local laws. around here you are allowed two fish per season and no throwing back or culling, when u get one u must keep it. So if you go out and snag two little ones, sorry-your season is done.
     
  6. F150Catfish

    F150Catfish New Member

    Messages:
    369
    State:
    Wisconsin
    yea I have some snag hooks and best spot to snagging by dam.
     

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  7. Believer

    Believer New Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    State:
    Greenwood, AR.
    Are any of you guys going to OKAM?
    I'm going to try to make it. Should be a great time!
     
  8. KGK20

    KGK20 New Member

    Messages:
    101
    State:
    MISSOURI
    i thought about trying it on mississppi river but not sure were to try.i asked a couple of guys last year ang they were not any help said they wont tell secrets
     
  9. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    I used to use a 7 foot Sturdy Stik rod and a Penn 209 spooled with 100 pound dacron for trolling. Since then, me and everybody else has upgraded to 10-12 foot surf rods and 80-100 braided line. I prefer 80-100 pound Power Bro and my dad and his buddy like 80 pound Ripcord.

    I started hitting more fish when I went to a longer rod because I get higher up in the water column. There have been too many times that I would roll fish at the end of my jerk due to not having enough rod length. Those suspended fish started getting hooked better with those longer surf rods.

    If your going to be trolling, any kind of snagging rod will work for you. Casting is how I prefer to fish for the spooners anymore though and I feel you definetly need a surf rod and the casting distance to do well.

    That's just my 2 cents.
     
  10. fishinnstudyin

    fishinnstudyin New Member

    Messages:
    62
    State:
    MO
    do you snag paddlefish with a boat or off the bank with those 10-12 foot surf rods? I'm just curious because I dont know how you guys would manuever those long rods in a boat. I dunno if its just me, but anything longer than 8 feet for a rod should be used on a bank.
     
  11. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    We don't ever have any problems. I think it helps staying out of each others way because you can snag farther off the side of the boat. The longer rods make it easier to manuever around obstacles. You can get away with using pretty light line with the long rods since they have more flex and shock absorption. Some guys get away with using 30 pound mono on their surf rods, but I still prefer atleast 65 pound braid for snagging.