Snagging Rigs and Methods guys plz share your rigs

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by Welder, Mar 15, 2009.

  1. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    I have seen in many posts members asking where to go to snagg and what Gear to use. I ask any and all to plz share info with fellow members.

    My gear I like to use from shore on the osage for bank snaggen is a 10 to 12 ft med action surf rod with a good large spinnen reel. I use 20 to 25 lb test offshore angler mono. A lot of guys I know like 30lb bigg game line. I snagg with 2 hooks 06 to 08 size. And use 3 to 6 ounces of weight depending on the current. I tie the 06 hook to the end of the mono with a double twist knot ( sacromento jam knot ). Then tie to the shank of the 06 treble with about 3 to 4 feet of braid snaggen line (90lb test squid line)works good. I uses a snell knot on the shank to make the rigg runn strait.
    About 1 1/2 to 2 ft down I tie the 07 or 08 with a tight overhand knot on the eye of the hook and wrap the line around the shank 3 or 4 times and put 2 or 3 overhand knots between the hook prongs and tighten them up to the base of the shank. You should have about 1 1/2 ft of line left, pull up a 6 inch loop and tie a double overhand knot. Then slide the end of the loop thru the eye of the bank weight and pull over it and snugg tight. Presto a nice snaggen rig. You can fish it till you hang it up, it wont weaken out like mono will when you tie your hooks with heavy mono. And it takes abuse from the bottom great. I have used the same rig all day with no break offs. Aso carry a stone hook sharpener with you or a hone file for keeping hooks sharp. I check my hooks every 6 casts or so and resharpen as needed. I get aound 60 to 90 yard casts with this rig the lighter line helps with casting distance and when ya get hung making it easy to break off. Its a funn fight when ya stick one with lighter line and not derick riggen lol.:wink:
     
  2. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    I like snagging from the bank. I use the gear mentioned above. I cast and let it hit the bottom and use a smooth but strong pull with the rod at 45 deg. I have found pulling the rod from the tip pointed out to the line back to the side works the best. I keep my line tight and reel back and pull again. You get a rythem to it. I try to keep my sinker just ticking bottom. I have noticed a good strong but smooth pull to the side seems to hook more fish and pulling to the side helps you put you whole body into it. I will make ya hurt, abbs, back, and arms. Hope this info helps
     

  3. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    10-12' surf rod and 65 or 80 lbs test Power Pro is what I run. Usually I tie on two 10/0 trebles and a 4oz bank sinker. The lower hook sits about 2' above the bank sinker and the upper hook sits about 6' up from the bank sinker.

    I've snagged fish using 20 pound mono before, but I've switched over to braid because I had trouble with getting the hooks to penetrate when using mono due to the stretch. The zero stretch of the braid allows me to get away with a less forceful sweep of the rod when snagging.
     
  4. bluetick1897

    bluetick1897 New Member

    Messages:
    46
    State:
    missouri
    7' Rod, Penn 309 Levelwind, 80 to 100 # Stren Superbraid, 2 12/0 treble hooks 3 feet apart and 1 foot above an 8 to 16 ounce bank sinker.

    Longer Rods are better from the bank. I like the shorter stout rods out of the boat. I would never snag with anything but no stretch braided line and the superbraid has small diameter and is very smooth. Less drag means less work and the hooks stay close to the bottom. Make your own sinkers and buy hooks in the 36 packs.
     
  5. huntoften

    huntoften New Member

    Messages:
    106
    State:
    Missouri
    Penn 49L spooled with 130lb braided dacron. I have a 6 foot ocean city rod I've had for over 20 years now. I start with a 4 inch loop in the end of the line, and loop a 20-40 oz sinker on it. Then about 8 inches up I loop a 10/0 mustad treble that I modify with a vice and 9 bends so it ends up being a 12/0. I loop it through the eye, then run a half hitch around the shank, and than another around the shank, then a last half hitch around two of the hooks. Keeps the line from binding in the middle of the hook and gives it a slight offset. Then I rig another 10/0 the same way about 18 inches up the line, then I put a 8/0 about 18 inches above that. If I'm in a big boat where I can get high off the water, I run two more hooks. We call it a death rig!:tounge_out:
     
  6. jolle

    jolle New Member

    Messages:
    59
    State:
    O'Fallon, MO
    10-12' surf rods with big spinning reels and 50# spiderwire/powerpro braid. We started as bank fishers and now go in boats on LOZ. We still prefer the long poles for the length of sweep and fish fighting ability. I also much prefer braid over mono due to the small diameter and lack of stretch. I once lost a bunch of braid and only had mono to respool, and when I got it back in the water it felt like I was pulling double the weight and that there was a bungee cord on the line. The braid really saves energy when yanking and helps to sink the hooks nicely when you hit one. As far as rigging, I generally use two 8-10/0 trebles, the first being 2-4 feet from the 4-5oz. sinker, and the next 2-4 feet above that. I started tying the bottom hook directly to the end of the braid, and using mono as a dropper to the sinker b/c if you let any slack in the line when you let up the braid tends to wrap around the hook until the sinker is all the way up to the hook. I also have noticed some fraying on the braid where it wraps around the shank of the hook if there are any rough spots on the hook, so I'm careful to examine often. I bend my hook points slightly outward from the shank and sharpen them right out of the box.