Snagging problems

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by sharpshooter95, Mar 15, 2009.

  1. sharpshooter95

    sharpshooter95 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    State:
    louisiana
    I tried snagging about 3 months ago with a 6 foot poll on the red river locks and dams. I could get not one cast back in beacuse every weight i chunked out the fell behing one of the many rocks, making me have to cut my line, EVERY time. Some people suggested using a longer pole to get futher cast, a bunch of people i know have good success snagging and i stink at it. Any suggestions?:eek:oooh:
     
  2. msucatfish

    msucatfish New Member

    Messages:
    52
    State:
    mississippi
    try those flat no snag weights
     

  3. roadkill636

    roadkill636 New Member

    Messages:
    551
    State:
    warrenton misso
    reel it in a whole LOT FASTER ,,,keep it up off the bottom
     
  4. sharpshooter95

    sharpshooter95 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    State:
    louisiana
    OK do i need to upgrade from my 6 foot pole to a 10 or 12? Or would it not change anything?
     
  5. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    IMO it would help with a longer pole. You also might try less weight. I use a 14' rod with 3oz flat sinker.
     
  6. sharpshooter95

    sharpshooter95 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    State:
    louisiana
    Ok now i have an excuse for getting a new rod and reel! Any advice on a model or brand that doesn't cost to much?
     
  7. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    I use a Meathunter 14' Hvy action. They are around $100-125. Other may have a better idea, this just works for me.
     
  8. sharpshooter95

    sharpshooter95 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    State:
    louisiana
    what lb/test line do you use?
     
  9. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    I use 25# mono. A lot of people use heavier line , but that is what I keep on my reels all the time. I use it for snagging and catfishing.
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    A commonly used pole here in Arkansas is a 'river rod' made from a 14' Fenwick blank. Line weight will depend on such things as current speed and the size of fish you'll be snagging. Snagging below the dams on the Arkansas river means snagging in heavy current with the possibility of snagging large fish, so 50# line is about the lightest line experienced snaggers will use. And I've seen a Penn 309 spooled with 50# mono get spooled. Here's a way to get a feel for what you need. Find a 10-12# piece of tree limb and tie your line to the middle of it; throw it way out into the fastest current; retrieve it with your rod & reel. That's what a fish that size will feel like, even when it's not fighting. The only reason not to go overboard on line size is that it will cut down on casting distance. It seems to me that using braided line with a mono leader would be the answer, but all the experienced snaggers I've talked to about it say that braided just isn't good for snagging. I can't say first hand, because braided line became popular after I had to quit snagging.
    The most used sinker for snagging seems to be the plain old bank sinker. And keeping it from hanging up is definitely an art. Cast out, quickly taking up any slack. Feel for the sinker to touch bottom while holding your rod just above level. Immediately give a big snagging pull. Quickly take up the slack as you drop your rod tip. As soon as you feel the sinker touch bottom, give another jerk. Repeat until you are ready to reel in, then hold the rod tip high and reel fast. The 'art' comes in jerking as soon as the sinker touches, rather than letting it drag across the bottom a couple of feet first, which will get you hung up. Even so, expect to lose sinkers and hooks. Experienced snaggers hearabouts will lose several sets per trip. A 'set' is a section of braided nylon line with 2 or 3 treble hooks and a big sinker on it; there's usually a loop at the top to tie your line to. Most snaggers make these up ahead of time to save time while fishing. The heavy nylon line is used because of abrasion on the rocks. Many snaggers simply tie their line to the loop, but I preferred to use a little different technique. I tied a really big heavy duty swivel to the end of my line, attached a short section of slightly lighter line, then attached the heavy nylon line. That way, when I did get hung up, the lighter line would be the breaking point, keeping me from losing a bunch of line off my reel.
    You'll need a heavy duty, good casting reel, if you want good distance and want it to last very long. A Penn 209 is rugged enough, but won't give you very good distance; a Penn 309 is a good snagging reel; it's very popular locally. A Penn 320GTi or 320GT2 will give you a little better distance than the 309, but is more expensive. The 309 is so popular locally that you can buy an electric retrieve for it locally, too.

    Good luck.
     
  11. sharpshooter95

    sharpshooter95 New Member

    Messages:
    8
    State:
    louisiana
    wow, thanks for your time.
    I love the idea of attaching lighter line, on the end of your main line, so that you don't lose much good line when you get hung.

    I think i may just get a combo from academy. They have some good reels on 10-14ft rods, for under $100.