Smallmouth and Rockbass for bait

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by Joey6500, Jan 7, 2009.

  1. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    You guys ever have trouble keepin these guys alive? I have a lot more trouble with these fish than anything else
     
  2. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I never have any problem keeping them alive. I use alot of smallmouth and largemouth throughout the summer, are you having trouble in transporting them or fishing them? rollo
     

  3. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P
    From my experience, smallmouths are the first and easiest baits to succumb to stress and die. Whenever I would mix the smallies in with bluegills ect into one baitbucket, I noticed a high mortality rate with the SMB. But, whenever I would seperate the species with different buckets, the SMB would have a higher survival rate.

    As for the rock bass, they are like chubbs and suckers, in constant need of cooler water. Once the water gets up to a certain temp, they begin to limp, get glassy eyes, and not active.

    I never ever have any luck with smallmouth bass in the spring or fall. Butin the warmer months and summer when a lively/kicking bait is need, you can't go wrong with these suckas! CHECK YOUR REGULATIONS.

    Bait handling and keeping is an integral component of a sucessful trip.
     
  4. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    I have trouble transporting and fishing with them.Any suggestion?
     
  5. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I agree on the handling. However, I mix all of my baits usually, with the exception of the bullheads and chubs and never have a problem keeping baits alive and very lively. Proper aeration, and maintaining adequate water temperatures are certainly important. Alot of the submersible pumps are good for short term, but I have seen how they will actually heat the water by running them over a period. Its also important you have plenty of space for your baits, overcrowding will definetely raise the mortality rates. I never have any problems keeping any baits though, besides shad sometimes. I usually carry 40-60 baits on a nights trip, and then transport them back home to the 100 gal. rubbermaid bait tank I have setup in the garage for the next trip.. If the baits are consistently dying there has to be a reason for it...rollo
     
  6. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    There not consistently dying.They just die quicker than other baits
     
  7. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    How are you hooking them? When using longer or larger baits, I run either a 9/0 Gamukatsu Octupus or 10/0. I hook the bass through the bottom lip, and out one nostril when bottom fishing a 3-way or carolina rig. When I lake fish, I fish them under a large homemade float and hook them shallow under the dorsel... i don't use rockbass that often, I usually have green sunfish or warmouths...rollo
     
  8. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I dunno why, its hard to tell, i have fished them all night with no success, and taken them off the hook and saved them for the next trip. I have always liked them for the reason of how hard they fight all night, and how hearty they have been for me.. sorry I can't help ya more, thats about all I can add..:wink: rollo
     
  9. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    I usually hook my bass between the dorsal and tail same thing with the rockbass.I think I'll try hookin then in the mouth next year.Green sunfish and warmouth are troopers to fish with ,I just have a hard time finding them that big sometimes
     
  10. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    yeah, them greenies are a great bait! goodluck to you man...rollo
     
  11. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P

    Like Rollo said,

    1. Overcrowding.
    2. High water temperature.
    3. Poor aeration. If you're gonna spend the time and money to catch em, you mind as well go the whole nine yards are get the best aeration system you can. The $10 Bubble Box will work fine for about 2 months and 15 baits, but when you are dealing with 40 to 60 baits, you need somthing strong to keep the water flowing and air pumping.

    Never tail hook a legal smallmouth bass unless you plan on getting phantom runs and snagged up. Always through the nostrils and lips for me.
     
  12. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    Nice .Thanks.When I go out I usually have to different bait tanks,usually a big cooler for bigger bait and a 5 gallon bucket for chubs and suckers.I got a pond pump in my livewell at home
     
  13. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P
    I also forgot, in the summer months and really hot weather conditions, I usually don't use my convention 5 or 10 gallon white buckets for baits. I either use a syrofoam bucket or a cooler. Why? Insulation! Without the insulated buckets or coolers, your water temp will rise quickly and the water will just get hot. When the water is hot, the fish breathe heavier, and when bait breathes heavier, the water get less oxygenated. Less oxygen means certain death. Death contaminates the already carbon dioxide rich bait water and it's a chain reaction. Not good to roll up to your spot and see 90% of your bait stiff! trust me, it has happened to me before i got smart about it.

    What I do to ensure the heaslthiest bait is transporting them in fresh, cold, and running creek water. Cold and pure creek water is highly oxgenated and alot safer than hot lake, pond, or river water. Having a bag of ice made with 100% pure spring water is helpful too! If you are transporting for more than an hour or so, just add some cubes of ice to the baitbucket to make sure the water is nice and cold. Remember, cold water lowers the baits heart rate thus slow breathing and less carbon dioxide in the baitwater.

     
  14. kenlaw76

    kenlaw76 New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    S.E. Pa.
    I just made a 55 Gal portable bait tank for the house and on the longer drives. I am going to get a few more Plastic drums and make some perminate bait tanks at the house with a filtration system and spray bars.
     
  15. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    Thats cool.Another thing I do on hot days is when using a cooler for a livewell I keep the bubbler or pump completely inside the cooler/livewell so it doesn't pull in the hot night air and warm the water
     
  16. smokey869

    smokey869 New Member

    Messages:
    966
    State:
    frederickt
    thats alright when using a cooler, but you do need to put a few air holes in the top, if it is shut up for a few hours the ocygen levels will really drop, i use a portable pump and have about 6 holes drilled in the top of the cooler, i run the air line through one of them, that and a bag of ice i get to keep it cool and the ice adds oxygen as it melts also, hope this helps
     
  17. Joey6500

    Joey6500 New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    Ohio
    Yup.Got it covered.Got 1 big 1 in the "O" of the coleman logo:wink:
     
  18. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    Here's another hint for those guys that bank fish every now and then. If you are getting your water from a spring, small creek etc. to put in your cooler, or adding ice to keep the water temp.s down. Make sure you temper it accordingly. Alot of people shock there baits when they catch them in the scorching hot summer, by dropping them in ice cold water! Not good. When I catch bait, I like to temper the cooler water with a bucket of the water which they were caught from. When you get to the river bank same thing, If you plan on putting your baits in a bait bucket from the truck and are going to drop them into the river for the night.. Fine. But, go down to the river, get a half bucket of the river water slowly add to your cooler in the truck every few minutes, allowing the baits to spend some time to adjust. Bring the water temps. up slowly like you dropped them... After warming the water up and the baits seem to be doing fine after a half hour of this I suggest, Then you can put them in the bait buckets and ease them in the warm river water.. Trust me, you will not only keep from shocking your baits and possibly killing some, but they will maintain a more lively nature also by taking care of them this way. Remember, it may be a pain in the butt, but if your like me, its worth it to keep good baits all night long! rollo
     
  19. hunted

    hunted New Member

    Messages:
    1,943
    State:
    washington court house,oh
    you might want to look at your bait buckets,or whatever you are putting them into.what was your 5 gallon bucket used for before it was a bait bucket?
    i know plastic can absorb chemicals and the like,if this happens,the chemicals can get to the bait and might not be good on them either.
     
  20. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    if they die just use them for cut bait.

    last year i fished an 8 inch live smallmouth in a hole for 3hrs, got no hits...

    i cut him up and casted out the head to the exact same spot, 3 minutes later i had my personal best 55-lb flathead hooked.