Small guage shotguns

Discussion in 'Bird Hunting' started by 223reload, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Was wondering if anyone shares my love of small guage shooting? I have a mossberg model 500 in 410 that I love to use on quail and dove, and I'm wanting to get a 28 but I'm not finding many manufacturers of them except in a single shot ,at least what I think are affordable to me
     
  2. Lngbo

    Lngbo New Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    Marion Ark
    I used to know some guys that hunted doves with a 410. Me, I gotta have alot more than a 410 and still miss alot. Those guys never missed.
     

  3. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I have learned to pick my shots wisely ,and dont go banging away. I do get lucky enough to get a limit with a box once in a while
     
  4. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I shoot a 28 gauge double. It's Spanish...made by Ugartechea...not fancy, but just lovely, and deadly on rabbits.
     
  5. splitshot

    splitshot New Member

    Messages:
    2,827
    State:
    Coxsakie,N.Y.
    Funny that you should ask that question. I just looked at a Charles Daley 20 ga. pump youth model camo chambered for two and three quarter and three inch shells, its fast and light and fits me like a glove. ( I'm only 5ft.6) I can use it for turkey, grouse and rabbits without feeling beat up at the end of the day. My old rem.870 12 ga. wingmaster just seems to get heavier and kick harder as i get older!! Now all i gotta do is convince Mama i need a new shotgun!!:lol:
     
  6. RivrLivn

    RivrLivn Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Missouri
    Love that Quail hunting!!!
    Used an overunder 12 for years then the 28ga Ruger Red Label.:big_smile:
    28ga is an amazing shell, way better speed and shot density than the 20ga.
    The key is to get a true 28ga framed gun and not just one necked down.
    This gives you the advantage of the weight and handling to go with the shell.
     
  7. Mark R.

    Mark R. New Member

    Messages:
    186
    State:
    Rush Springs, OK
    I have a 28 Spanish double that is a good shooter.
    It's built on a small frame and is a fun gun to shoot.
    Bought my son a .410 pump to play around with.
     
  8. Wabash River Bear

    Wabash River Bear New Member

    Messages:
    3,019
    State:
    Indiana
    Richard,
    Mossberg has a line of economical priced over/unders, around $500.00. Real sharp looking guns, seem to be of good quality. I was checking them out at Gander Mtn. Was thinking of getting a ported 12 gauge, but I just got the new boat, well you know how it goes. I think they offered a 28, and I know they offer a 410. :cool2:
     
  9. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    I have a 410 bolt action tube feed that my dad left me. I haven't shoot it for some time. I believe I will.

    Danny
     
  10. bearcat

    bearcat Member

    Messages:
    925
    State:
    Nokomis, Illinois
    If looking for a 28 gauge. Check out the Remington spartan model 28 gauge over and under. It is a nice small frame gun and reasonably price. Around 450 plus tax. If I am not mistaken doesnt remington make the 28 in the 870 and 1100 yet? Good luck.

    On the mossberg doubles. I would stay away from them. Local shop sold two and both came back broken before a full box of shells went thru them. Also had loads of trouble with warrenty. Ended up sending them back and got different guns. Just a heads up.
     
  11. ratkinson

    ratkinson New Member

    Messages:
    627
    State:
    NY
    I've got a mossberg 16g. I have never missed a deer with it..... yet... It is far and away one of my favorite "meat guns".
     
  12. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I use a Savage 20ga over and under with a 22 mag. on top, its good for still game and the 20ga for moving game. Around here its hard to find 28ga shells unless you order them. That wasn't a real popular gauge, something like the 16 gauge. Just a tid bit of history about the shotgun, the gauge of a gun was started back in the early days when a person would take a pound of lead to a gunsmith and tell him how many balls to make from it which later became known as the gauge of a gun, 12 balls = 12ga, 16 balls = 16ga and so on but the .410 is not a gauge at all, its a caliber which I started both my boys out hunting with.
     
  13. Jesse168

    Jesse168 Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    The main reason the 28 gauge is still alive today is because of it's skeet shooting position.

    There are 4 clasifications for skeet shooting...12 ga; 20 ga; 28 ga; and the .410. Years ago there also was a 16 ga. clasification but it was determined that the 16 was too close to the 12 ga. and 20 ga.

    The 16 ga even though originally a 2 9/16 length case that was only increased to 2 3/4 length could be loaded up to 1 1/4 oz of shot or down to standard 1 oz of shot. The standard load was equal to the 12 ga but more than the 20 ga. The true 16 ga framed guns were lighter than the 12ga and about the same weight as the 20 but could do almost everything the standard 12 ga could. This alone was the real reason manufacturers pushed for the discontinue of the 16 ga. Without the 16 ga. more shooters would buy 2 guns.... instead of one that would be light as a 20 and do what the 12 could do.

    There were 16 ga 3 inch mag made but they were European made and very few were known in the US and no ammuniton for the 3 inch mag was made in the US. They have a lot of odd size shot shells and rifle & pistol cartridges over there still. You have to remember they are on the metric system.

    Jesse
     
  14. bearcat

    bearcat Member

    Messages:
    925
    State:
    Nokomis, Illinois
    Hey Jesse. Didnt the european market have a 24 guage shotgun also? talk about odd size.
     
  15. porboy

    porboy New Member

    Messages:
    629
    State:
    TX Panhand
    I have a Remington 870 in 410 and a Remington 1100 in 28 guage and have shot a bunch of shells in both. I believe the 410 is the hardest shotgun shell to reload I have ever loaded. The shot likes to hang up in the loader and I have to lightly bang the loader with a small piece of dowel rod to make sure it goes in the wad instead of my wifes carpet. One thing, never pattern a 410 or it will scare the heck out of you how many big holes there is in its pattern.
    Bill
     
  16. Jesse168

    Jesse168 Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    I use to have a neighbor that had a 24 ga & a 22 ga double barrel shotguns.

    One of the more popular ga shotguns in Great Brittain (England) is the 14 ga.

    Around 1900 there were so many different gauge shotguns available it's unbelieveable. Everything from ZERO ga to 9mm shoulder guns. There were commercial "PUNT GUNS" that were large enough to kill whole flocks of ducks or geese. The punt guns were so big that they were usually mounted on a swivel at the bow of a boat.

    I looked through one of my referance books and these are some of the gauges I found: 0; 1; 2; 3; 4; 6; 8; 10; 11; 12/14ga Martini; 12; 14; 15; 16; 64 Maynard; 18; 20; 24; 55 Manard; 28; 32; 11.15X52MM; 44XL; 410; 360 Centerfire; 9.1X40mm; 9MM RIMFIRE; 9MM Centerfire; 32 rimfire; 310 Remington; 7MM; 6 MM; 20-Caliber Wingo. There are a lot other gauges but they are not as common.

    There is a very good market for the obsolete and rare shotgun, rifle, and pistol cases as well as the boxes they came in. A lot of times just the empty box is worth as much as a new gun.

    Check out E-Bay for the going prices of empty shotgun shell boxes. You will get a big suprise.

    Jesse
     
  17. Jesse168

    Jesse168 Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    If you are using one of regular reloaders( Mec; Pacific; etc) pull down on the handle so that the end of the loading tube is past the top of the shotshell. This will keep your shot from being trapped by the wad fingers. If the shot is being held by the slide bar you may have too much clearance which will make the shot bind. Also if shot sits for a long time moisture will collect and make the shot collect in lumps instead of single pieces of shot. Also make sure the shot tube is clear of burrs it only take one little burr for the shot to be stopped from dropping on through the tube.

    Jesse
     
  18. Blue Duck

    Blue Duck New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    Idaho
    I have had lots of .410's in the past. Best one was probably the 870 Rem In .410. Right now the only .410 I have is a Contender pistol with a 10" barrel. I shoot lots of grouse with it. Where I live in north Idaho we don't have many upland species we can hunt except for forest grouse. I always wanted 28 ga. tho .........
     
  19. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    The first real ,small guage I used was a Rem. mod 1100 in 410 man it was a sweet gun ,I checked the Rem website and the only 1100 they offer in a 28 or 410 is a skeet model ...... and the 1100.00 pricetag done scared me away, I'm going to try to find a spartan or Mossy ,besides I dont own a dbl bbl so thats an excuse to buy one!!
     
  20. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    Man those are SWEET!! guns. I have a Savage 124 over & under .22 LR top & .410 on bottom. My Dad got it for me when I was about 12 years old that was almost 30 years ago and it's still my fav gun. Well I say it's my fav,but I also have my Grandfathers .Winch 74 .22 semi that is loaded thru a slot on the side of the stock. It was my Grandfathers fav small game gun he got it in 1954 and used it until he passed away.