Slip Float Rigging.

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by CJ21, Nov 11, 2007.

  1. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    I wondering how you guys rig your slip float rigs? I use to one but I am going to start using it agian, its the best way I catch my cats. I am going to try some of those premier catfish stalker floats the 1 oz model. I love drift fishing the creeks and rivers with a slip float rig. and its works every time. I just hate I stop using it.
     
  2. Zebco 33

    Zebco 33 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Illinois
    I go after fiddler sized cats and up to 10 pounders, so you might have to adjust if you are after larger fish.

    I use 12-14 pound Cajun Red from Wally World, and I just got my rigs switched over to baitcasters from a hodge podge of med spinning reels and spincasters. I do notice I like the baitcasters alot better than the others, they seeem to allow the float stop to reel on and off with ease.

    Ok, first I thread on the float stop. I use the rubber ones from Wally World, I think they grip longer than the threaded ones. I then thread on the small bead and then the bobber. I use a 1/2 ounce weighted bobber, that I really like, but can't remember the name of. Its made from a different wood then balsa and I half to get it from the high priced sporting store instead of Wally World. But it is weighted about 3/8 of an ounce and its made to be used with 1/2 of an ounce of weight. Works great for long bank casting, but I would use a little less weight and smaller bobber for creeks and such. Anyways, I also add a small bead and then the weights and a larger bead. Finally I tie on the swivel.

    So, I''m throwing about 1.5-2 ounces of weighted bobber and rig, normally. I've thrown up to 4 ounces WAY OUT into Rend with a Little Joe Bobber and needed weights and shad.

    I also like to go "lite" and use a smaller bobber rigged like above, but I don't add slip weights. I use split shot lined up the leader about six inches from the tie on swivel and about a foot from the hook. This seems to give the bait a more natural presentation when floating in a lite current.

    The one thing that really sold me on this setup is that you have all of your weight ahead of your leader. So you can use a lighter leader or braided line for a more suttle presentation of your bait to the cats. Sometimes, when you don't need broomsticks and bailing wire, this will produce more fish than with the heavier stuff.

    Jerry
     

  3. Zebco 33

    Zebco 33 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Illinois
    I forgot to add that I've used a dab of Super Glue to keep the stopper in place on the larger weights if needed. Of course, after I've gotten the depth I wanted.

    Jerry
     
  4. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Thanks for the tip do you know how long are your floats?
     
  5. Zebco 33

    Zebco 33 New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    Illinois
    The "regular" ones that I use are about four inches OAL, the ones that I throw around 1.5 ounces.

    The Little Joe's from Wally World are like eight or seven inches long!

    If I get a chance in the morning, I'll snap a pic and post it CJ.

    Jerry
     
  6. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Ok thanks you been a big help.
     
  7. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

    Messages:
    818
    State:
    Fl.
    When I use a slip float "whitch it not often" I use rubber bands for bobber stops,they hold better then most stops and work well on any type of reel.
     
  8. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY

    I also use small pieces of rubber bands also. They work better than anything,IMO. They are also easy to take off and VERY cheap. About 500 for a buck.:wink::big_smile:
    Also I use slip floats 99% of the time. The ones Gene makes are excellent also!!! He's also a sponsor of the BOC!!! www.wildwolfproducts.com