Skipjack - How do you use them?

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by Dav1, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Dav1

    Dav1 New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    missouri
    I have used skipjack for bait but I don't know if I am using them the right way. How do you cut them to use for bait. I have used the heads, fillets, and the tails. I fish in the MIssippi River in Southeast Missouri. What am I doing wrong.

    David
     
  2. TeamCatHazzard

    TeamCatHazzard New Member

    Messages:
    517
    State:
    Illinois
    Doesnt really sound like anything to me. I have used the heads, gut pouches, I usually dont use the tail though. I have also used filets. I take it you just havent caught anything on them? How many times have you tried and where are you fishing them? Also what bait presentation are you using? How are you rigging up?
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I don't use the tails from skippies or shad unless I've used everything else up. I generally cut shad into steaks except for the very big ones, which I cut into chunks. Small and medium sized skipjack get steaked; larger skippies get filleted, then the fillets cut into chunks or strips. Large heads are good if you're targeting trophy sized fish, but not good for numbers.
     
  4. Dav1

    Dav1 New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    missouri
    I usually use a 3-way rig or a carolina rig. I have tried cutting the skipjack all kinds of ways. I usually have 3-5 rods out with various baits from stinkbait to live bait to cut bait. But it seems like I get more bites on the other baits rather than the cut bait.

    David
     
  5. tkishkape

    tkishkape New Member

    Messages:
    782
    State:
    Gore, Okla
    My favorite (and go-to) bait is skipjack. The skippies I catch below the L&D16 average 16" long with some going as large as 24". They are cut into chunks after fileting, reserving the head and gut. Sometimes I'll filet one side and leave the bone in the other. The filets are split lengthwise and then cut into chunks 1/2" thick, leaving the skin on.

    Due to the snaggy places I fish and the relative large size of the blues, I have had to rig up a little on the heavy side to be able to consistantly bring the fish to the boat.

    My main line is at least 50# test, some of my stouter rods are strung with 100# saltwater dacron. The 5/0 to 7/0 circle hooks are snelled directly to the end of the 6' long 80# leader. A 24" long 17# line for the sinker is snelled to the 80# leader about 24" above the hook.

    When the fish hangs the sinker up in the snags, the lighter line will break, releasing the snag and allowing the fish to be played.

    I had to go to the heavy rigs in order to be able to turn the fish away from the stumps and snags that the blues seem to prefer. The circle hook is less likely to hang up on it's own, and allows a positive hookset when the bluecat has the bait.

    Try this system when you encounter such conditions... you'll be glad you did.