Sinkers for drifting

Discussion in 'NORTH CAROLINA LAKES / RESERVOIRS' started by dwreel, Jan 27, 2006.

  1. dwreel

    dwreel New Member

    Messages:
    554
    State:
    Southern Pines, NC
    Drift fishing is new to me and I've been wondering what weight (oz.) to use. I have a box of 2oz. bank sinkers. Would they be overkill for drifting? What would be a good range of weights to have on hand to cover most situations?I'll be fishing Tillery and Jordan mostly. Later I hope to check out Baden which I have never fished.

    Thanks guys. I appreciate any and all responses.
     
  2. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    dwreel ive done alot of drift fishing at santee with the cork rig and had real good luck with it there. i use 1oz when fishing say 0-20ft and 2oz 20-40ft so i think you will be fine with 2oz on badin and tillery because of the water depths but it also depends on your drift speed. i can tell you first had the big boys dont like it fast. i use to drift santee without socks and caught alot of fish in the summer but not many big fish(30 plus) until i bought my drift socks. we dont get the winds here so i dont think you need the drift socks here for the most part.with that said ive tried drifting badin and tillery without much luck. i have caught fish suspended in the summer months drifting straight down around the thermocline line at badin. mostly small schooling blues in th8-10lb range.another thing about drifting straight down is you need a good leader because when the big boy hits and sucks that bait in it dont take much to cut the leader. its got to do with the angle. you think about it the line is going straight down, the fish hit and you set the hook, the fish jerks his head back and forth and cuts your line. that 90degree angle of your line against that sand paper wont work too good. i love to drift too but i just cant get it to work in north carolina like it does in santee. maybe the bottom is too muddy or something. maybe you can figure them out for us.
     

  3. CMJ

    CMJ Guest

    Hey Dwreel, I do a lot of drift fishing in Tillery in the spring and summer months. I use 1 oz. weights. The rig I use is in this order , weight, swivel, leader, hook, with a cigar cork on the leader between the swivel and hook. I caught several in the 20 to 30 pound range last year but most were 5 to 20. Right now I think its best to achor.
     
  4. mack in n.c.

    mack in n.c. Member

    Messages:
    287
    State:
    cary nc
    sometimes i use carolina rig w cork, probaly the best and cheapest way....i think thats what the last 2 post were talking about....i also use a gapen bait walker......it comes in various weights and has an arm like a spinnerbait..........can put a cork between the swivel and hook also but not needed sometimes because arm of the bait walker has leader off the bottom.....a bait walker is hard to find in a nc tackle store......thanks mack
     
  5. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,245
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    Everyone will have there own weight and way of doing it. Just have to remember to just have enough lead to keep it on the bottom. Start out light and move up from there.
     
  6. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    I use 1-2 oz. sinkers.

    Mine are "worm weights" or some call them "snake weights". I take a piece shoelace and cut a 3"-4" section. I burn one end shut and then add 1/0 or 2/0 buckshot, then burn the end shut leaving enough slack to slip a line through or snap onto a snap swivel.

    The flexible weight rolls across the bottom much better than a lead weight, thus it is less likely to snag.

    You have to make sure you get athletic shoelaces that are the tube type. Some are just flat stiched laces. I find the laces at sports authority.

    I use these on the simple drifting set-up. Circle hook, 18"-24" of leader, heavy snap swivel, main line. I attach the worm weight to the snap and there is a crappie cork on the leader 8"-10" above the hook that allows the bait to float up and off the bottom.
     
  7. dwreel

    dwreel New Member

    Messages:
    554
    State:
    Southern Pines, NC
    A lot of good information. Thanks guys. Hadn't thought about the heavier leader. The shoe lace thing is cool. Have to look into that. I prefer to keep the bait off the bottom muck, so the cork will solce that problem.

    Soon as weather gets a little better, I'm headed out. Will post a report when I get back.

    Thanks guys.
     
  8. geodeman

    geodeman New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    north carolina
    Greetings:
    I have a question, if thats ok? What weight line do you use for drift fishing? I am set up with a heavy bait caster, capable of manageing 30 lb line, and an ocean rig that does good with up to 80 lb line, and am curious about your opinion on this subject.
    Geodeman
     
  9. maddcatties

    maddcatties New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    NORTH CAROLINA
    do you guy's eat the big ones or is it not safe
     
  10. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    No real need for line that heavy. I fish 15# line now, downsizing from 25#. I have landed ocean fish in the 45# range on 15# line without a problem, and cats up to 29# on it. I used to think I needed heavier line, but more experienced anglers taught me better.

    I use Ande saltwater line and a 25#-50# abrasion leader for catfish depending on the waters I am fishing. The Ande line seems to have a good bit of stretch to it, and the heavier leader adds some security right at the boat.

    I make sure my drag is set correctly on EVERY trip. If you set it correctly before you start fishing, then there is no reason to mess with it while landing a fish unless you want the challenge of not loosing it to line breakage.

    I just don't see a Blue or Flathead breaking 15# unless there is a bad angler on the rod. Between the line, stretch in the line, and the rod, you have to dish out a lot of force to snap a 15# line.
     
  11. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,245
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    I use 20 lb. big game line and works for all around.
     
  12. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    i m sticking with 30lb and had a nice little flathead break that after 20min fight last year. caught his little brother at 42lb.
     
  13. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Catfishrun I think I could be swayed from my thinking if I fished for Flatheads.

    I don't know much about catching them, and I have only lucked up on a couple smaller ones, but my understanding is that they do like stump, rock, and log ridden river bottoms. I can see where some extra abrasion protection on your line would come in handy if you are having to work one of those bigger hogs off the bottom and out of some cover.