Sinker style and weight in slow moving water

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by yotetrapper, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
    I'm going to buy some sinkers tomorrow. The spot I'm fishing on Thursday is a slow moving drainage that runs into the Mississippi. It's maybe 40' wide and 10-15 feet deep. I'm targeting channels.... I caught some last year there in the 3-4lb range but am betting there are bigger ones in there too. Will be tight line bottom fishing with a carolina rig set up.

    Wondering what size and style would work best for there. Thanks.
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Oh, my Lord... your gonna get more response than you want to read. In slow current, my recommendation, based upon at least 1/2 a century of fishing, is that you use a no-roll, no-snag, or egg sinker. It is difficult to know what weight sinker to recommend as we don't know the type of rod/reel your using, or how fast the current actually is. If it was still water and you were using something like a 6' bass rod, I'd say to start out at about 1/2 ounce and go up to 1 ounce. If your gonna need more weight, and you are using a bass rod, you may want to upgrade your outfit to something a little heavier. If you are using 16' rods, you can probably go up to about a pound weight. LOL Oops, you said a Carolina rig, didn't you. Oh, well, same thing except you probably want to use a no-snag, bell, pyramid or a bank sinker. I'd put one out on bottom with a no-snag or egg sinker so they wouldn't feel the weight dragging. Use a hook about 5/0 and bait it with a perch about 3" long. If you want big fish, use big bait. Tie your pole down if your not using a clicker or a good rod holder. I'd hate to see your avatar with tears in your eyes because your pole went water skiing.
     

  3. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
    I'm using a borrowed poll. 7' MH with a Penn 710Z. Aint after a huge fish right now just some good eating channels.
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Think the weights I talked about above will be all right.

    Okay, so you should be able to cast clear across the creek/drainage ditch. Now you gotta start thinking like a cat. They don't like to lay out on a bare bottom, as though they are at the beach sunbathing. They like something, rock, tree, ditch, logs, etc to break the current off them so they don't have to use energy trying to swim, and they want the small bait critters washed downstream to their mouths. When they actively start feeding, NORMALLY (not always) they head towards the bank or shallow water in search of small fish, craw fish, worms, and small dead animals which may have fallen into the water. So, what you have to do is fish all over the place. Try different spots. Get hung up? That means there is possibly some cover there. Casts in different spots, vary the weight so it will slowly drift down stream. Change your type of baits often. Put poles out with different bait so you can tell what they are hitting on, then bait all your poles with that bait. When all else fails, bait out with worms and see if the fish are there. Because they were last year does not mean they are there this early in the season. Most important, don't get frustrated. If it was easy there would be no enjoyment in it.
     
  5. yotetrapper

    yotetrapper New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
    I've never fished early season. I'm hoping there might be cats here. I think this water might be warmer, as it's the only water open anywhere. It is about a half mile or so from the Mississippi. About maybe 2 miles upstream, there is a pump station. The place I fished in the summer was about a mile up from where am fishing now. Can't get back to that place now, and plus, in order for fish to get to there, they must pass through here LOL. There is a bridge right by where am fishing. On the downstream side of it, the drainage runs into a bit of timber before making it's way to the river. On the upstream side of the bridge, it runs through mainly openland, with some trees right on the bank. Last year night fishing in June, we caught several 2-3lb channels and my inexperience lost me a bigger one on a limb line when I tried to simply hoist it up and out of the water to where i was hanging down off a leaning tree. Pete was quick to snap pictures of me in butt deep water after I tumbled off the log into the water following the fish LOL.

    Thanks for the help. I have some 1oz egg sinkers already, so might pick up a couple bigger no roll or pyramid sinkers today. Also, those 5/0 kahle hooks. Been meaning to try out them kahles, all i've used before are J hooks and trebles.
     
  6. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    Try some 2 and 3 oz. no rolls should be plenty of weight for casting distance and holding power. On the carolina rigs make your leaders 18 to 24 inches and peg a 2 to 3 inch cigar float 6 to 8 inches from your 5/0 kahle to suspend your bait off the bottom. Good Luck.
     
  7. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Aw Shucks has the weights, both sizes and style right. Egg sinkers should do the job. I use mostly 3/4 and 1 oz eggs in flat or slow current. Follow his advice and you will be on the right track.
     
  8. KYTRAPPER

    KYTRAPPER New Member

    Messages:
    307
    State:
    Floyd county,KY
    I river fish a lot and personally I woould recommend the No-Rolls. I went ahead an invested in a mold. It was worth the money.