Shooting From A Treestand

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by trnsmsn, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Good Morning, What Is The "Rule Of Thumb" To Use When Shooting From An Elevated Stand ? In Regards To Which Pin Sight You Should Use.
     
  2. Coyote1

    Coyote1 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Missouri
    Dear Brother Elliot;
    The general rule of thumb is that guns, and bows, tend to shoot higher, or ABOVE the aiming point when your up in a tree stand shooting down.
    The BEST way to explore this, because every rifle/load/sight and every bow/sight/arrow have their own individual trajectories is to actually shoot from the height and distance that your planning on doing on the hunt!
    To my knowledge, this is the only way to be 100% sure how your equipment is going to shoot at a given angle and distance!!
    Also, something you might want to remember is to Make SURE that when shooting at an angle [remember I don't know how much angle you will be shooting at] that on a bow, you still shoot at your normal FULL DRAW. With a Rifle/Shotgun, ect, make sure you use the same anchor, pull into your shoulder, ect, as you would doing a level shot!
    Many times it is this "problem" that causes even more of a miss than the distance above the line of sight that your bow or rifle will shoot!! It's also something that most hunters; archers and riflemen, are not aware of and it causes them A LOT of problems after they have corrected for the line of sight change but are still missing!!:sad2:
    So, NOW that YOU KNOW, I expect you will NOT be missing!
    I've just touched on the most basic of basics to answer your question. Should you have any other questions, or need a bit more detail please don't hesitate to contact me via PM. :smile2: I will always do whatever I can to help a fellow shooter/archer/Brother out by sharing what little knowledge I have on the subjects and will never knowingly tell or steer you wrong!
    As "Chat" is very difficult for me I hope I have been able to explain the answer to you in a way that is easy for you to understand. If I have not, please accept my apologies and let me know so I can try again! The fault will not be yours, it will be mine because of my difficulties with computer "Chat"!
    I hope this helps with your question!:smile2:
    Fraternally and Cordially,
    Coyote1
    [[[[[End of Post]]]]]
     

  3. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Thank you for your prompt reply. I guess what I should have said/ask, is do you add your distance up the tree to the distance from the tree, to calculate total yardage.

    For instance, if you are 10 yds(30') up the tree & the animal is 20 yds from the tree, is that 30 yds ?:confused2:
     
  4. IL Hunter

    IL Hunter New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Normal, IL
    I use my range finder from the gound to other trees in the area that way i know what the true distance of the shot is. Another good thing to do is practice shooting from a stand. There is no one pin that I trust to use.
     
  5. beeheck

    beeheck New Member

    Messages:
    631
    State:
    Iowa / Missouri
    http://www.womenhunters.com/ProStaff/prostaff-question-answer.html

    Go here and scroll down to find the discussion and pictures on this subject. I agree with what I read to a point. I just aim where I want to shoot as the height of my stands aren't very high, under 20' high. I might be a little high or low and I would of guessed low but I learned how or where to shoot out of my stands by putting field tips on my arrows and climbing into my stands and shooting at my hat I left on a branch about 2.5' high at different yardages. When I can consistently ruin my hat I figure I'm good to go, so I go and buy another hat. They make a sight that compensates for stand elevation automatically and I guess it has its place in the world but it wouldn't be on my bow. I would tell you to shoot, shoot some more and then shoot again until your comfortable with your equipment and know how it will perform in most every situation you might encounter. Just for giggles I drew this up on CAD and if your stand is 30' high and your deer is 60 feet away the distance to the deer from the top of your stand in a straight line is 71' 5&5/8" away. Again, I would just aim right on and let 'er rip but then I always have a tendency to aim just a hair high.
     
  6. IL_CATFISH

    IL_CATFISH New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Illinois
    A lot of it depends on what type of bow you shoot. Most of the newer compound bows shot fast enough that the trajectory of a 20 yard shot wont be much different whether you are in a stand or shooting on the ground. Basically, your arrow flight will be so flat from 20 yards that you wont have to aim any differently then what you are while practicing in your back yard.

    The one thing that I will tell you is to take your arrows exit (out of the deer) into account. If you are in a tree stand (20-30 ft up) and you just put your pin on 'where you think' the vitals are on the deer, a lot of times the arrow will pass through the deer low, missing the vitals (or even worse, clipping one lung and leaving the deer wounded). If you have a decoy target to shoot at it will help you a ton. Here's what you do. Get in your stand, draw your bow back and place your pin on 'where you think' the vitals are. Now, take into consideration where the arrow is going to exit. At this elevation, you are probably gonna have to raise your pin on the deer just a litte in order to punch both lungs and potentially the heart.

    The sport is all about learning because you can always get better. I would suggest you check out this site http://www.archerytalk.com. This site is full of useful information.

    Good luck and shoot straight!
     
  7. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    I want to thank all of you for your input/advice. I am going to start practicing from an elevated point. The problem is, there are no trees around my house that tall.

    I used to shoot from a 15' ladder stand but now with my climber I do see alot more game, plus I believe that I am out of the "scent cone" @ a higher elevation.

    For what it's worth I shoot a 70 lb. draw bow with light arrows & 100 gr. broadheads. I shot it thru a "speedmeter" once & it's pushing 300 fps.
     
  8. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    I can't help you with the shooting mechanics, but you can find the distance pretty easily with the Pythagorean Theorem (A squared + B squared = C squared).

    Just square your height ( 10 squared = 100 ), square the distance from the tree to the target ( 20 squared = 400 ), and add those two numbers together ( 400 + 100 = 500 ). To find the distance between you and the target (the hypotenuse), just calculate the square root of 500, which comes to approximately 22.36 yards/67 feet. Unless you're a robot, you'll prolly want to use a calculator on that last step.

    Hope this helps!
     
  9. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
    Hey Elliot, I also recommend that you shoot some from your stand. Our season opens here on October 1. When I bowhunted I would take the field tips off and put on my broad heads and start shooting some from a tree the first of September. I'd like to add that I had new broad heads to hunt with and I practiced with dull ones identical to what I hunted with.

    I would shot from my stand or on the top of the house at unknown yardages and have the kids pull my arrows. I made a quiver out of pvc and they would put my arrows in it and I would pull it up and start all over. It's fun to get together with some buddy's and see who can out do each other.

    One mechanical pointer I can think of that is extremely important is to bend at the hips. When you are shooting from an elevated position you can decrease the amount of deviation by keeping your back straight and bending at the waist. Good luck, I hope to see some blood on the ground pretty soon.

    st
     
  10. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
     
  11. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I like to shoot practice shots from my stand by picking a spot or a leaf on the ground at different distances. When you can consistanly hit what you're shooting at than all you have to do is pick a spot on the deer just as you normally do when shooting on the ground. I only use one pin on my bow and I practice on the ground by throwing 2 liter plastic bottles with a little water in them at different distances and as long as can I hit them with my first shot then I have no problem killing deer anywhere because I don't have to try to guess the yardage, I just have to visualize how far that bottle was or that leaf and pick a spot. I'm not very good at judging distance acturally enough in the woods.
     
  12. kycatman01

    kycatman01 New Member

    Messages:
    856
    State:
    kentucky
    Looks like everyone gave alot of great info. So, I will just say good luck and hope we all get a nice deer!!
     
  13. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Yes, all the information is very good & I know that it all comes from experience. It will surely enhance my success, that's why I love this place :wink:
     
  14. IL_CATFISH

    IL_CATFISH New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Illinois
     
  15. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
    Hey Elliot, I've had to wait for them to walk out from under my stand to shoot them also. My first year I passed on shots over 10 yards because I didn't have enough confidence in my shooting. The longest shot shot for my first 4 deer was 8 yards. Then as I got more confidence I started taking longer shots but I think my longest one was 26 yards.

    I enjoyed shooting local tournaments during the off season and if you get a chance that is some of the best practice you can get. I used 3 or 4 pins for that but I did like John said and only hunted with 1. If you have a good flat shooting bow and don't try to stretch your shots 1 pin is the way to go. Remember, bend at the waist.

    st
     
  16. IL_CATFISH

    IL_CATFISH New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Illinois
    .



    Good advice on the one pin sight also brother. Thats what I would recommend unless you hunt open ranges with little to now under growth. For example, if you are hunting grassy pastures then a 40 yard shot is not out of the question for some. However, if you are hunting thick timber with thickets everywhere, a 40 yard shot is not only very tough but also unethical. If you cant lay the smackdown without 100% confidence then you should pass on the shot. My max distance is 25 yards here in the thick timbers on IL.
     
  17. mangus

    mangus New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    n.c.
     
  18. mangus

    mangus New Member

    Messages:
    118
    State:
    n.c.
    if you know where you are going to hunt you can practice from that tree before bow season comes in. step off about 20 steps from your tree in several shooting spots mark them with small stob with a orange ribbon tied to it or something you can see easily. the stob does not have to be big, i would make it as small as i could get by with. set one pin to the 20 steps. then do the same for 30 steps. after the stobs are in the ground for a few weeks the deer will pay no attention to them and you will know roughly what pin to use. hope this works for you. i dont do this because i trust my shots but i know people that do and they leave the stobs in the ground all season. i would also take some help when doing this so you want have to keep getting out of your stand. practice shooting sitting too. ive had deer sneek in on me and there was no way i could have stood and took a shot. i shoot right handed an this allows me to shoot to the left of an front of me when sitting. be sure to wear a saftey harnest 25' and 30' is a hard fall.