shoot yearling does are let them walk?

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by team salmon, Oct 11, 2009.

  1. team salmon

    team salmon New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    kansas
    I'm currious to find out who prefers to shoot yearling does or let them walk and why - here's my thoughts - I would much rather shoot a yearling then a mature doe due to the fact that I want mature does on my hunting ground to draw the bucks in during the rut - my understanding is that yearling will dispatch to other areas where as the mature does are already established in there home rang ( my hunting area) - also for guys that think they can stock pile bucks on their ground hate to inform ya but those small bucks are moving on also - not to say I'm gonna shoot a small buck but if I shoot em' on my ground that's a deer that a guy a few miles away won't have the chance to harvest in 4 or 5 yrs. - if you're not hunting horns do yourself and others a favor and shoot a yearling doe or two instead of a small buck - it's also much easier on your back -if ya don't like what I have to say feel free to voice your oppinon - that's the great thing about this site is we all have the chance to learn from one another - if you prefer to harvest the mature does in your area would you please give me some insite on the benifits of it - thanks and happy hunting!!
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    If the comments I received on the other threads hold true. and the guys are really hunting to thin the herds, then the little doe should be harvested. You have no assurance you will see another deer for the remainder of the season. If your a meat hunter, you take what you can get to fill the pot. If your hunting for the sport (and possibly your ego) you will wait for the big buck, even if you don't see one the whole year. Guess it really depends upon the number of deer in your area. I don't think they are as plentiful in Oklahoma as the rest of the country as I doubt I have even seen 5 road kills all year. If the guy is hunting to control the herds, I have no problem with that. If he is hunting just to be able to brag about the number of deer he killed this year, I think it is just as wrong as the commercial fishermen catching the big cats.
     

  3. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    If Im meat hunting I probably only have a little bit of time to hunt so Im shooting what walks by as long as it's legal.

    Controlling or managing a herd. It would be big does that are consistently producing small bucks year in and year out. I would also harvest smaller ones too. The older does are more capable of caring for there young also.
     
  4. restorerancientiron

    restorerancientiron New Member

    Messages:
    1,061
    State:
    Cadiz, KY
    I prefer to shoot the mature does as I want the most meat I can get.However there has been times when a mature doe and a couple of smaller ones come by and I will always take the smaller one of the three if I am still trying to fill my freezer and the end of season is fast approaching.The problem with shooting yearlings is you have to be real close to tell a doe from a button buck , sometimes you can tell by their actions but not always.I also want to thin the herd and taking a button buck does little to help.My main feeling is if you are harvesting to eat then do what you need to.good post
     
  5. phase5supply

    phase5supply New Member

    Messages:
    126
    State:
    Hope Mills, NC
    In my case I have to many deer, I have choose to go the other way for the next few years. I am harvesting 2 1/2 years and older does, the reason for me is that older does usually have 2 fawns a year. This keeps me from having even more deer the next year. After all the natural food is gone, I can put out 3000lbs of corn a week at 2 feed sites and it all gets eaten. I don't have any pigs it is all deer, squirrels and coons. This is on a 750 acres of land.
     
  6. backwoodsman68geric

    backwoodsman68geric New Member

    Messages:
    943
    State:
    illinois
    It depends on your location, available tags, deer population, need for meat etc. We have almost unlimited antlerless tags available. We shoot every antlerless deer we can and target fawns out of groups/herds. Side note, if a herd/group comes by, if you take the lead doe the others may hang around for you to fill more tags. 60lb deer are easier on the back to deal with, great eating and by eliminating the fawn you eliminate all the future deer it would have bred and the deer those would have etc. Another side note button bucks disperse, sometimes over 10 miles. We shoot every one of them, outfitters and out of staters have about ruined deer hunting here in Illinois. Every button buck we remove is one less some a**hole out of stater takes home the next year or two. Besides button bucks are fine eating.
     
  7. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    All these guys have good points. If it is legal and you need it, shoot it. It makes little difference in most areas. We are over populated here, and the state keeps making it easier for people to harvest ANY deer.

    That being said, I don't buy the theory of "mature does" and "home area". Most hunters never see the Alpha doe; they are as elusive as a big buck and mostly nocturnal in some areas. Deer have very large core areas in most places, and one square mile is common. Unless you have control of an area that big, then you are probable hunting deer that are moving back and forth constantly depending on what is happening in their environment. I believe food and cover have much more to do with whether bucks or does will stay in an area. It has been proven that the biggest bucks control the best/most secure bedding areas. When one is take out of the herd, another mature buck will quickly take over his area.

    When the rut hits, all bets are off. Bucks from other areas, as well as hunters, will be pushing new deer, mature and immature, into areas they may not use during the rest of the year. Providing the right security for bucks is the best way to keep them around.
     
  8. catfisherman369

    catfisherman369 Floyd

    Messages:
    4,944
    State:
    Nashville Il.
    :0a27:
     
  9. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,711
    State:
    Independen
    Remember that when you decide you want to fish or hunt in some other "a**hole's" state. Don't call me...

    Shooting button bucks just so they won't grow into a mature deer that somebody else might harvest is about the most ignorant and selfish thing I've heard. Someday that will come back to bite you!

    I don't shoot yearlings unless I'm 100% positive it's not a button buck. The whole idea is thinning out the does which make up to 70-80% of the herd around here. Bucks & does are born at about a 50/50 ratio, and I've seen plenty of mommas with twin button bucks at their side.

    Like was said earlier, the older does will have twins and sometimes triplets, so for population control, I say shoot the mommas and let the little ones fend for themselves.
     
  10. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    The head of Va Deptartment of Fish and Wildlife has worked for the department probably 30 years. One of his many hats he has worn while serving Virginia was head deer biologist for Virginia.

    I met him 15 years ago at a Doe killing hunt at one of the historic plantations on the James river about half way between Richmond and Jamestown. Beautiful place and dirt lousy with deer. About 30 hunters culled 50 plus deer off the place that day. I got four,,,,sweet!

    Duncan told me that shooting anterless deer basically doesn't effect the buck population. What about the button bucks I asked? He said it doesn't matter. At that farm the ratio was 20 does to one buck. Flash forward and its now 1.5 does per buck. Just as many deer, (dirt lousy). Now when you go there you see bucks all the time and a wall hangers galore. The owner will have you flogged if you shoot a small buck and insists any buck shot be mounted. I don't mount anything so I let em walk,but if its a slick head it gets shot.:big_smile:
     
  11. phase5supply

    phase5supply New Member

    Messages:
    126
    State:
    Hope Mills, NC
     
  12. lance

    lance New Member

    Messages:
    2,658
    State:
    kentucky
    I meat hunt and shoot does period . It's been 4 years since I have shot a buck . It was not big but the last day of the season. I will someday shoot a big buck . If it gets late in the season lil bucks beware . I have always had enough time to decide to shoot or not . Half grown deer turn their heads to . Shoot close and use your scope or binoc's .
     
  13. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,503
    State:
    Napoleon, Mo.
    I usually let the yearlings walk. To many bigger does. Only shoot the bigger bucks. I'm hunting for meat.
     
  14. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    If its brown its down!!! I never know when i'll see another deer, so i shoot what i can. The only exception to this is small bucks early in the season. Only allowed 1 buck (unless you kill 2 does and buy a bonus antlered deer stamp), so i like to save that for something with decent horns, though not necesarily a "trophy". If its a mother and 2 fawns, i shoot momma and the fawns usually stick around long enough to kill them too. Them young deer are tender, good eatin and easier to gut and carry. Still got spots? Who cares!! I'll be able to cut them tenderloins with a fork! We're allowed 10 antlerless deer per season (10 bow, 10 muzzleloader, 10 shotgun), so i still have plenty of chances to kill enough for the freezer, even if some small ones are shot. The farmers also want all the deer shot....they dont care what size it is.
     
  15. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    "The farmers also want all the deer shot....they dont care what size it is."

    That's the way my buddy feels. He wants them all killed. He doesn't realize that shooting everything I see on his farm won't do much good. He owns one section of a long wooded ridge in the middle of agra fields. I usually take 1/2 a dozen off his place, but within a week the place is full of them again because most of his place is very thick and has several springs. As soon as I thin them out, more move in.
     
  16. Fletchhunter

    Fletchhunter New Member

    Messages:
    618
    State:
    Indiana
    I do not shoot yearlings because of the price for license and processing. It just don't make sense to me to spend that kind of money for very little meat
     
  17. calogan

    calogan New Member

    Messages:
    241
    State:
    Iowa
    That’s the way I feel too, it’s the same price for 100 pounds of meat or 50. Plus the older ones are more challenging, here is Iowa, the babies will practically walk up and sniff the end of your barrel:smile2:
     
  18. ammo warrior

    ammo warrior Member

    Messages:
    868
    State:
    Columbia, MO
    Kyle, thanks for your post. I don't think that anyone would put you down for your opinion/action with deer hunting. It is obvious that care is taken during your hunt for deer. As long as you have good intentions for the health of the deer population, then respect is the only reaction that you should get besides personal hunting opinion.
    I will hunt according to the MDC guidlines. They are responsible for monitoring the deer health/population needs. I believe that they do a good job. I prefer to eat deer that is not so tough and strong tasting, which of course lends to shooting a young doe within the MDC guidelines.
    I am more of a bowhunter than firearms so the deer actually stand a better chance to escape from ending up on my table. But I do have my share of pride and will shoot a 'trophy' buck if the right situation is there. But that is not my reason for hunting. I love the preparation, getting into the woods and becoming part of the element, and harvesting a deer on their turf. I guess that it kinda fulfills the need to be the top preditor in the animal kingdon...Hmm :cool2: keep it legal :wink:
     
  19. Fl.catman

    Fl.catman New Member

    Messages:
    132
    State:
    Fl
    I have a plant/tree farm and those field rats "you all call deer" can be a real problem. The area I'm in is where the state record deer came from. The state game & hunters want them in this area but me and a few other farmers don't. We have asked Fish & Game to do something to help control the problem but they refuse to do anything. We the farmers are the ones that are lossing our crops to the deer Fl. Game & the hunters couldn't care less. Fl game wants them to make money off of and the hunters want bragging rights all at the cost of us farmers. We have been tracking the movement of the large groups of 30 or so. We are going to network and as they move from one plot of land to the next we are going to take care of the problem. Because each year the problem get's worse 15 years ago there was only a few and we never messed with them. But now it's nothing to see 3 or 4 groups of 20-30+ in one day. This get's vary costly to farmers and we are tired of feeding them so the state can make money & the hunters can brag while we foot the bill. We tried to let a few hunters hunt our lands but they only want to take the large bucks for bragging rights and it didn't help us at all. All us farmers got out of that deal was piles of beer cans and trash all over the place where the hunters camped.
     
  20. ammo warrior

    ammo warrior Member

    Messages:
    868
    State:
    Columbia, MO
    Just like true sportsman & hunters are responsible and selective, maybe the same concept would help your situation. I am sure that there are hunting clubs that would to 'gather' on your place and hunt, especially if they could be assured that they will be the only ones. I am sorry that you had the misfortune with 'trashy' hunters, most of us aren't like that. I believe that if you are more 'selective' with who you let hunt on your place, you will come out ahead. A club won't want to bring reproach on their name, so will be much more careful, especially if they want to be invited back. I hope that this will be of help. Best wishes :cool2: