Shock Leader

Discussion in 'Misc Fishing Tackle Talk' started by roh1961, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. roh1961

    roh1961 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Texas
    I hear about the short leaders for abrasion and for shock absorption fishing but does anyone use a long heavy shock leader that goes through the guides and wraps a few times around the spool to absorb the shock when casting heavy weight or is that a surf thing. Is it done for spinning reels as well as casting reels? I don't normally cast that heavy of a weight and don't use a long leader but am coming to the point of having to increase my weight size pretty heavy on a large river nearby. Thanks in advance, Randy
     
  2. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    I have heard of it for surf casting! They say for safety reasons, any weight over 6ozs should use a shockleader, there is a formula but I forget it. 6 oz of weight on a 15 foot rod can be a dangerous object, during the unexpected, like a backlash! Can easly take your fishing buddy down the way, out!
     

  3. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    I use them alot. Not just for big weights but anytime I'm casting real hard or fishing around alot of rocks or something. I use 50lb mono and I tie usually 15 feet of it to my line where it wraps around my spool a few times. I use it for spinning reels and baitcasters. It helps alot, it seems to be most important though when throwing BIG weights. I've got a few Hatteras Heaver rods and when I usually cast them with all my power and when I first got them I wasnt using a shock leader and it just wasnt working too great. So I started using a shock leader and it helps alot!

    Also, for shark fishing in saltwater is an important factor. Because of the sandpaper like skin a shark has. It will cut your line alot of times when it turns and runs in the opposite direction of you the line rubs against the sharks body and it cuts it. Also when Cobia fishing it can help, they will also cut it. So I say be safe and use a shock leader.

    Zakk:)
     
  4. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Shock leaders are a must for distance casting. Alot of folks fail to realize what a 6 oz weight using some of the methods of distance casting will do to a truck windshield, radiator, or human skulls.

    I've seen a truck with a 6 oz pyramid weight in the radiator and the broken windshields. Seen some close calls with humans but fortunately I haven't seen anyone hit.

    On Hatteras heavers spooled with 20- 25 pound line I generally make the shock leader out of 80 pound test and long enough for 3 wraps on the reel and try not to fish within a 100 yards of anyone else.

    But along with age and spending time on the beaches I found the only time you really need to distance cast is if you have an extended onshore blow that muddies the water close in other wise you are more times then not casting over the fish.
     
  5. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    I use a shock leader on the 12-ft surf rig when fishing from shore or pier. Usually 30-lb mainline, 60-lb mono shock leader about 20ft long thru 8-oz slipsinker, 3/0 barrel swivel, 95-lb single strand wire. I can heave this rig with a 12 inch whiting out past the breakers. Took a 175-lb blacktip shatk of Longboat Key a few years ago.

    On the cat rods, 8-ft MH CatMaxx/6500C3, 20-lb Trilene big game, I never felt the need for a shock leader, even with 8-oz no-roll and big bait. I probably don't feel the need to cast that far, so I don't load it up very much.
     
  6. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Good post! Alot of times we really are casting over fish. I like to use my heavers at dams. I cast into little current pockets and stuff. When I'm surf fishing I like to get my bait as far out as possible though because the angle of my line goes out over the waves, while when I cast closer to the beach my line goes in the waves and it moves my baits around alot and washes them up. It's not really because the fish are way out there or anything. Alot of times the fish are actually in the waves and stuff, chasing baitfish up towards the beach and whatnot. Alot of times when I'm surf fishing it is for Sharks though and they really seem to just be roaming around out there, just having big bloody bait helps with them alot IMO. I think the only reason to cast way out as far as trying to actually catch more fish is if there is some sort of structure out there or something, like s hole or sandbar or something. When catfish at dams it can help to be able to cast way out to a scour hole, or eddy, etc.

    Zakk.:)

     
  7. roh1961

    roh1961 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Texas
    I usually don't use over 7 foot rods but I have a 10 1/2 foot casting rod and a 11 foot spinning rod that will be used for long casts. Would the longest ones be the only ones that might need a shock leader?
     
  8. Larry

    Larry New Member

    Messages:
    707
    State:
    Minnesota
    I've never had a chance to do surf fishing. So pardon my ignorance
    This application applies with the use of spinning reels only??? Is that correct?
     
  9. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Hmmm....In my opinion yes only the longer rods would need them. But of course if you are casting those 7ft rods like they are 10ft ones. I mean casting them real hard or something maybe you need a shock leader.

    MarkJ, can probaly tell you better than I can. I'm still kinda new at the whole long distance casting thing.

    Zakk.:)
     
  10. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    No, it can apply for baitcasters also. Any kind of reel on a rod that you are trying to cast a long way, esspecialy with big weights.:)
     
  11. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    In my opinion the technique used for distance casting would dictate the use of a shock leader along with the close proximity of other people.
    One technique involves letting about 6 feet of line out and swinging the rod in a circular motion over your head getting faster and faster and then releasing. This is the real dangerous one but effective and I've never mastered it. I have all but given up on it.:)

    The other would be to hold the rod over your shoulder and release the line putting the terminal rig close to the heel of your shoe and then launching forward. This method produces alot of forward momentum and either your weight breaks off and goes behind you , straight up, or straight out but both of these methods produce alot of energy and places it on the leader which would be the linkest link unless you beef it up.
     
  12. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC


    That second technique is pretty much what I do. I'm still practicing alot on it, like I said I'm still kinda new at it. Also I'm not very big, so it's a little hard to be slinging a 10-11ft pole with big weights. When I dont have a shock leader on mine it almost always breaks esspecialy when I've been fishing for cats around rocks or alot of structure. Thing about a shock leader is you need to get your knot right or it will break almost every time.....(When you tie the shock leader to your main line)

    Zakk.:)
     
  13. roh1961

    roh1961 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Texas
    I have a cousin wanting me to fish at the Red River close to the gates and I'm getting ready. I got a Breakaway Cannon trigger (like a bow release) from eBay to see if it would help with the heavier weights causing line pressure on my hands.
     
  14. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Zakk, if you are fishing for red drum dont waste your time during the day unless you can see them in the surf.
    Find a real dark beach at night like on Ocracoke, Davis, or Portsmouth islands.
    If its dark they'll come in close to shore and arent so skittish.
    The drum gurus fish at night.
     
  15. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Yeah, I dont fish for them much. But I do almost all my surf fishing at night. Only time I do it during the day is during striper season at Nags Head....like around oregon inlet. I read somewhere about how big Redfish get way off the end of the piers or something and they are attracted to certain lights or something:confused:

    Thanks, Zakk.:)
     
  16. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Probally attracted to the food a pier produces whether it swims or is thrown in.
    Only one time Hae I seen waves full of red drum in the 30-50 pound range.
     
  17. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Ahhh....yes probaly so. Like the baitfish that are attracted to the lights. I had read about how these guys go out there I think it is in the fall and they throw out some poles with cut bait way out there. Now I remember something else, they said the redfish never liked to get all the way in the light but on the edge of it instead.

    I remember last spring fishing on the sunshine skyway pier in Florida there was alot of big tarpon and other big fish that would lurk around the edge of the pier lights most likely munching on the bait fish and stuff. I actually watched one guy hook a real big tarpon. But he didnt have the proper gear to land it or anything it basically spooled him but it was great while it lasted, watching it jump out of the water and seeing the look on his face.....lol

    Zakk.:)
     
  18. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Learning to "read" the beach is alot more important then being about to cast 200 yards. You cant catch fish everywhere on a 15 mile long beach even when they are biting good.
    You got to know where to stop the truck and say this is it. This is where they are.

    Hey Zakk, you know NC is now ranked one of the top spots for huge Tarpon right?
     
  19. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Yeah I know what you mean. My dad was teaching me about how to read the beach to see where there were like deeper holes. It's got to do with how the water goes back out after washing up on the beach.....we are both still pretty new at surf fishing though. I mean we started a couple years ago. We mostly have done our saltwater fishing off of piers in Florida, because that's where alot of my family is from and my great grandpa used to fish there and that's how my dad got started fishing. My great grandpa would fish for huge snook off of "Gandy Bridge" then he started teaching my dad and well it just got better from then on.

    No, I really didnt know we were ranked one of the top for Tarpon. I mean I knew we had some great Tarpon fishing but didnt know we were ranked for it. Thanks.

    Zakk.:)