Shallow water below wing dykes on the Missouri

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by Mr.T, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    While DougC and I were out on Sunday (second time ever on the river in my boat (the one with the brand-new 115hp Yamaha)), we were slowly exploring the area right below a wing dyke and I was caught off guard when the depth suddenly went from 8 ft to to about a foot or so and I was dragging my lower unit in the mud. I couldn't tell anything visually about the water that would make me think it was shallow, which contributed to my surprise.

    Fortunately, we didn't have any trouble getting off the mud, but it kind of spooked me for the rest of the day and we avoided a few places that we might have been able to get into, for fear that we'd get stuck in the mud. My boat is heavy enough that I suspect it'd stay put once run aground, and I still recall my experience (in my other boat) with shallow water on Truman Lake last fall that I'd rather not repeat.

    So what are the words of wisdom from those of you who've fished the river more than me? Am I worrying about nothing, or is the likelihood of getting beached on a mud flat high enough to warrant extra caution? My real worry is getting on the upstream side of a shallow spot and being pushed farther onto it by the current, unable to do anything about the situation.

    And supposing that I find myself stuck one day, what's the best way for getting unstuck?
     
  2. Willy

    Willy New Member

    Messages:
    242
    State:
    Missouri
    Best way I can tell ya is to go into a dike is to slowly motor in as close to the rocks on the head as ya can. These days thats what ya have to do with lower water levels and conditions. Another thing to watch is what is the water doing and if there is riffles on the water most of the time that is a sign of shallow water or a obstruction under the water surface.When in doubt go slow and carefully.
     

  3. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    You have good reason for concern. Like Willy said, stay within 10 feet of the wing dyke itself and that keeps you safe on most rock walls. When the river levels are high a large hole forms adjacent to the wall and all that silt is deposited about 40-100 yards downstream. If you stray too far from those dykes you are gonna find low water thats for sure. Make some carefull mental notes while your running around with the river being low, and you will know where the gotcha areas are when the river is up. Be safe out there and keep exploring. Set your sonar up with its shallow water alarm feature and it will generally warn you of upcoming trouble. I set my Lowrance to alarm me at 3 feet that way I can jump off of that throttle before I tear up anything. Good Luck.
     
  4. cschottfish

    cschottfish New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    Ofallon, Mo.
    when around dikes it helps to have a pole as a depth check up front.
     
  5. Mocathunter

    Mocathunter New Member

    Messages:
    52
    State:
    St. Joseph, Missouri
    The other fellas have pretty much some it up. Only one thing to add; on a day when the wind isn't howling, you can see the sand/mud flats below dykes. The have a flatter water surface appearance. If you use the surface to identify the ripple-hole-run you will see that the run portion tends to be flat, when you are below a wingdyke.
     
  6. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    I carry a 15' pole in the boat for such occasions and watch the sonar like a hawk.
     
  7. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Remember if you do get stuck the sand your on is always moving and shifting. So it's a little easyer to get off of then you think. Some times just sitting there the current will push you off on it's own. Other times you have to help your boat out by using an boat paddle or something. Never had to break out my cell phone yet though.
     
  8. cross_their_eyes

    cross_their_eyes New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    Show Me State
    The Missouri can change quick. You may run one day in one spot and the next week be in trouble. Watch the sonar, go slow and use a depth stick when in doubt. The water usually around the dykes are normaly okay, just check you depth when entering them. As far a getting out when stuck...I usually jump out, raise my lower unit and push :)
     
  9. Dave53

    Dave53 New Member

    Messages:
    411
    State:
    Lonedell M
    If I suspect the water to be low I make a pass with the boat and watch the waves..you will see the waves over the really shallow water will be definitely different as it passes over the shallow water..I have so far only missed one time doing this..and ran into shallow water..I didn't want to get out in that dirty nasty muddy leach infested water so I moved everything to the front of the boat and lifted the motor to the first notch and worked my way out of the shallows..... Oh, one other thing might help..if you see one of those crains standing in the water with most of his legs showing..he really is not 6' tall:roll_eyes: As I was moving things to the front of the boat one of those smark ellic birds landed 30 yards from me as if to say..hay look dummy!
     
  10. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Marty,
    Just for peace of mind lower Your boat insurance deductable to $100. I lowered mine and it only cost an extra $35 to go from $500 deduct to $100, money well spent in My book. That way if You do screw something up your not out so much of those hard earned greenbacks!!!!!
     
  11. CQuest

    CQuest New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    St.Peters, Missouri

    I normally buy one prop a year learning where i can and can not go!
     
  12. just cats

    just cats New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Leslie Missouri
    Just go slow and if you start churning up mud, slip it in reverse, tilt up your lower unit a bit and back right out. What you really need to watch out for in those areas are the flying carp. If you haven't experienced them yet then you are in for a surprise. It's funny the first time one comes in the boat but it gets old real fast, especially when they bust up your equipment which they do quite easily.
     
  13. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Marty got introduced to Asian carp out fishing the Kaw with Me one night.

    Most of the time I find Asian Carp in slack deeper water (10'+) I've also been shown first hand That you are better off going Fast through areas that are infested with asian carp. When You haul ass through thier territory, Most of them jump up behind the boat Vs going slow and they jump up infront, besides, and IN your boat. This is a good tatic if You find flying carp in familar Deeper water.
     
  14. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    You know, I haven't seen a single asian carp in 5 trips on the river, and I've been in areas where they should have been. I'd trade that luck, however, for a 50 lb blue...
     
  15. just cats

    just cats New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Leslie Missouri
    I've been seeing less of them the past few weeks but there is still no shortage of them around New Haven. I think maybe they have scattered some after they've finished spawning. Wish they'd scatter completely out of here. The slack holes are full of newly hatched fry, thousands of them. I wonder if they will compete with the shad enough to affect their numbers? Does anyone else think they are on the way to being a real problem for the Mo.?
     
  16. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    First Off, Welcome to the BOC Jack. Glad to have you on board. Secondly, I do see these exotic fishes causing problems to the river system. I dont have scientific data to go along with my conclustions, but it seems to me I have noticed less and less Shad and Herring Populations on the river these past couple of years. I know the gizzard shad, and greenbacks (threadfins) compete with the asians for the same food sources. I reckon only time will tell the long term effect these asian carps have on our fishery. Hopefully these asians will go away one day. Till then, they make good bait. :smile2:
     
  17. cschottfish

    cschottfish New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    Ofallon, Mo.
    I have stoped fishing at night on the cuiver river they are so bad. If you dont have them where you fish be thank full they are a true pain in the neck, head belly or lower if you are standing up. My buddy thought it would be funny to try and catch one, the fish almost took him out of the boat. He forgot agought kinetic energy 20# fish 10 mph = flat on back in bottom of boat.
     
  18. just cats

    just cats New Member

    Messages:
    325
    State:
    Leslie Missouri
    Thanks for the welcome Cuz, I just began using them for bait some this year after I talked with a guy who said he was catching flatheads on them. I haven't caught much on them yet , a few small blues and a couple channels, no flats yet. But the past few weeks have been real slow for me on the river with shad too so I can't really judge the carp bait just yet. I know from reading your posts that you are pretty high on them and you seem to know your way around the river pretty well so I'm going to keep trying them, along with shad of course, I'm not ready to give them up just yet. But I am going to give the carp a good try . At the least I'll be ridding the river of a few of them , not that those few will make much of a dent but it's something anyway. I used to turn everything back that I wasn't going to eat, even gars and dogfish and such , and the asian that jumped in the boat from time to time but now a days, if a bighead or silver jumps in my boat he doesn't leave alive, whether I need bait or not. He gets the hammer treatment.
    Gotta say, the BOC is one incredible site, never seen such a knowlegeable bunch that is so willing to share what they know. I've been hunting catfish for longer than I care to remember and you guys have taught me more in a few weeks than I've learned on my own in the past few years. Sure glad to be here and hope I can add something to the mix now and then to help fellow catters.