Shad tank filtering system

Discussion in 'Livewell and Bait Tank Review' started by riverlover, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. riverlover

    riverlover New Member

    Messages:
    54
    State:
    Missouri
    I'm building my own shad tank. I was wondering how to keep the scales and slim out without having a overflow. Any ideas. regular water filters cost a bunch. I have an idea of a container and a air duct filter:eek:oooh:
     
  2. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC

  3. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
  4. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    If you're really dead-set on building your own, you'd probably do well to study the design of the Grayline, Creek Bank or Blue Water bait tank filtration systems. Those are proven designs that work and work well.

    But, as I've recommended to others before, you'd be better off to just save up your pennies and buy a good quality bait tank. Anything you manage to cobble together yourself will eventually show it's limitations, probably at a time when you really don't want it to.
     
  5. JoeFriday

    JoeFriday New Member

    Messages:
    127
    State:
    Indep. missouri
    I went and bought a old freezer for 40 bucks off craigslist and then got a pump that has filters in it...It was pretty cheap...The pond pumps are alot cheaper then the pumps they sell at the petstore and work just fine.
     
  6. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL

    Good advice.. Mr T actually helped me work out some of the design questions I had on mine when I did it (after recommending I just buy one :wink:)....He makes some good points on the limitations on the homebuilt.. I'm real happy with mine, especially for the money, but a commercial tank certainly has its advantages...
     
  7. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

    Messages:
    1,619
    State:
    Sherman IL
    One other thing, I only use mine on my boat, for a nite/day/trip.. If your looking to keep bait for extended amounts of time, thats a different beast altogether than what I built....
     
  8. jedimanhunter

    jedimanhunter New Member

    Messages:
    121
    State:
    Texas
    I put an aerator in the bottom side of a round 30 gallon plastic tank with the screw on mesh screen, ran the hose externally to a livewell spray tip that I picked up at bass pro that is mounted in the top cap. I also had a Y fitting so when I needed to drain it i could turn the spry tip off at the Y and open the other side that had a quichk disconnect water hose to hang over the boat. Gotta be able to drain it, too heavy to lift, too slow to dip out.

    I have not tried it out yet so it might be another fine invention of junk laying around my shop but it initally works great. I think with it not being insulated like a store bought model is probably going to be the downside of it.
     
  9. JoeFriday

    JoeFriday New Member

    Messages:
    127
    State:
    Indep. missouri
    The guy at the bait shop tonight told me you cant keep shad alive in a tank...I have had fish in my tank for about 6 months now, its set up nice, the water is nice and clear but i put shad in there for the first time last night and 3 of the 4 died...Any ideas? Is there a difference between just a regular tank or what this guy was wanting a " Shad Tank Filtering System" Thanks.
     
  10. riverlover

    riverlover New Member

    Messages:
    54
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks guys,
    I got some really good ideas now. My design is similier to Tim's. But now have a better idea how to rig it up. once again thanks. OOH YEAH have you heard of putting rock salt in the water to help the shad out.:smile2::smile2:
     
  11. slider

    slider New Member

    Messages:
    581
    State:
    louisiana, mo
    yep the rock salt helps to put a good slime coat on the shad,i use shad keeper does the same thing but also takes the impurities out of the tap water. this is how i treat shad when i catch them i have my bait tank and a cooler when i dump the shad out of the net they go in to the cooler of water to get rid of scales and some poo they hang in the cooler for a couple of min. then take a dip net and move them to the bait tank. also you need to watch ur water temps ,start out 10 degrees under what the temp of the water is u took them out of and keep it there, if ya see any start to die get rid of them. also keep the foam off the water this robs them of o2 you can buy foam off or take a 4 oz dropper bottle and a pack of non dairy creamer and mix with water this does the same thing. (activated charcoal in the filter system is a big plus gets rid of the amonia which causes them to get red noseed and die)hope this helps

    slider
     
  12. hawk

    hawk New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    kenton ohio
    well fella sounds like your all on the right track I've done the bottom pick up pump many times and i'm tired of replacing the pump after it freezes up after 4 or 5 hours of use from scales and slim. I'm in the midst of building a shad tank out of a 55 gal drum on its side with a through haul pump and a modified pvc filtration system and a venturi air induction . The thing is you have to cut your water pressure back but keep the same volume so it doesn't peel the scales off of the shad . it also has to provide a great supply of dissolve oxegen. You have to make it so that you have activated charcole in your filtration system also to get rid of the amonia. When i complete it I'll post pics and if any questions i check this thing 3 or 4 times daily .
     
  13. MSgtCatfish

    MSgtCatfish New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Alabama
    I think a lot of people are making rigs with equipment on them they really don't need. We have no problem keeping shad alive and we don't have any type of filters or anything. What we have are two 30 gallon tanks side by side. We catch the shad, put them in one tank, and let them crap and shed scales and them move them over to the other tank. Sometimes we don't have time to do that and we still don't have problems. Once in the tank we add about a box of rock salt, a capful of BETTER BAIT (better than shad keeper and treats a lot more water per can), a few ounces of ACR and that's all we add. The one thing I think people most often overlook is you have to have your water circulating, if not, the shad will die, you have to keep them schooling. We have a pump that pumps the water up and back into the tank with a spray nozzle that is angled so the water circulates and keeps the shad schooling. And we have an aerator stone, 6 inches in length and that is it. Nothing that takes a rocket scientits to figure out or build. Another thing to keep in mind, is you need to let the shad and water air out, i.e. if you have a lid on your tank, keep it open when you aren't driving or trailering, and try to keep it out of direct sun light. If you keep the lid closed, you will get massive amount of ammonia build up and that will kill the shad with a quickness. We've kept shad alive for days on weeks and even reused them after using them for bait in one hole and moved to another one.

    As in other posts I've made about shad and keeping them alive, I learned these from a buddy who does nothing but fishes for striper and he learned his tips and tricks from a man who has been guiding for stripers for 30+ years.

    I'm not saying don't add all those pumps and filters just don't forget the other key ingredients and don't forget to circulate the water so the shad start to school, not to fast and not to slow. Every thing you can add will more than likely help, just don't forget the "not so common" common sense things as well.:wink:

    One other comment, the scales and crap that normally clog up your filter on your tank, if you have it set up like I mentioned above and have the water circulating, all that crap sits on the bottom and in the middle around the circulating water (trapped in the vortex on the bottom of the tank), then you can use a small minnow net and scoop it out, no more clogged filters.
     
  14. hawk

    hawk New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    kenton ohio
    well here the thing Msgt that i see wrong with your set up. For my application I don't have the room for 2 tanks to start and I when I get shad i have to get enough for a couple weeks because never sure if i'll have time to go catch some when i have to drive 45 miles in the opposite direction of where i get bait . so the thing is I'm not in a boat . I have a live well in the back of my pick up truck that i keep my bait in . so you tell me how to keep them alive with out a filter for more then a few mins with them loosing scales and slime and plugging up to prefilter on a submergible pump and then plugging up the pump .There are a lot of differant situations here and i bet most of us don't have a boat that we can put 2 bait tanks on and have room to move around .
     
  15. puddle jumper

    puddle jumper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,507
    State:
    NW.Georgia
    RL,
    Im just starting to look into bilding one myself so i dont have a lot to add, but there is a ton of good information on this site that will help in your desision on what to use and what not to,,, thought it might help,,:wink:
    Puddle...

    http://www.keepalive.net/guide.htm
     
  16. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    the 3 biggest factors to keeping shad alive are water temps., ammonia, and circulation. shad either swim or die. they dont sit on the bottom, or hide out in structure. the water or the shad have to be moving. they emit massive amounts of ammonia. so, some kind of filter is a necessity. and the media in the filter will be saturated in no time at all. and need to be changed a lot. and the hardest obstacle to overcome in a bait tank, water temps. if you can figure out how to overcome that problem, by all means post it. I have a few ideas. 1: take a big cooler and fit it with a coil of flexible copper tubing and a small circulation pump. this will work great but needs to be filled with ice regularily. I've thought about burying the coil in the ground to keep the temps stabilized. but it's totally stationary then. I've also thought about putting my tank in the garage next to my bait refrigerator, and putting the coil inside of the refer. great idea, but my garage is too hot during the day when it's closed up for this. I gave up on the idea of keeping shad alive. I take a cooler full of ice and a bucket with holes drilled in it when i catch shad for bait. I net them, put them in the bucket on land till they die, then rinse them off and put them in ziploc bags on ice.
     
  17. MSgtCatfish

    MSgtCatfish New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Alabama
    Well, as stated we don't always switch from one tank to another, we do put them in one tank and leave them and just add the ingredients and get the circulating going. The scales and crap will be on the bottom that you can scoop out with a net. My buddy who striper fishes has a tank in his shed that he keeps bait in and he has no filter or none of that stuff. He treats the water, keeps it circulating and has air stones in it.

    Not sure how big of a tank you have in the back of your truck, but a buddy and me caught over 400 4-6 inch gizzard shad in one cast in MS one year and was able to transport some of them via 5 gallon bucket until he backed the truck down and then we loaded half in a 150 gallon tank and they lived until the next day until we were done fishing and we let the live ones go, and yes there were a few dead ones, we weren't prepped for that many at one time. Point is if you want to stockpile bait so you don't have to go 45 miles away then invest in a good sized tank in your truck and/or one at your house.

    My overall point was people are adding alot of stuff on to bait tanks but I think are overlooking other things, like keeping the water circulating, popping the top of the tank to let it air out, and other little things like that.

    If you only have a 10 gallon bait tank on your boat, then you can't hold as much but you can keep some alive or opt to go with brim or some salties or something else like just using cut bait.

    We don't have a pump in the water on our tank so nothing gets clogged up, again, the scales and crap stay on the bottom caught in the vortex created by the circulating water. now if I plop a keep alive down in the tank then sure it will probably suck up and the filter get pretty nasty but we don't use them and we have no problems keeping shad alive.