Shad from Lake to Tank

Discussion in 'Shad Talk' started by dust777man, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. dust777man

    dust777man New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    SC
    I was wondering the best way to transfer shad caught in the lake to a bait tank at home? I have been catching a bunch of shad in my net but am not sure about the proper way to change the temp to keep them alive in a bait tank. The lake temp right now is around 88 degrees. I know that is way to warm to keep them alive for an extended period of time. I've tried and it doesn't work. I know alot of bait shops keep there tanks around 72 degrees and the water that the bait is caught out of is a lot warmer than that. How is the best way to change the water temp so the bait doesn't go into shock? As far as bait goes I am referring to shad and herring.
     
  2. Shimano

    Shimano New Member

    Messages:
    195
    State:
    North Carolina
    I normally pump water out of my holding tank into my bait tank until the temperature is about the same before tranfering any bait. If you have well water and you have a good well you can keep a steady flow of water running into the tank to keep the temperature regulated.
     

  3. flatheadhunterx

    flatheadhunterx Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    South Carolina
    I would add ice to my bait tank in small portions to slowly cool the water off to a desired temp then transfer them into the holding tankwhen the temps are the same.
     
  4. flatheadhunterx

    flatheadhunterx Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    South Carolina
    Dusty there used to be a guy over across the lake from portman marina that sold herring and his tanks were outside warm water and they even had algea growing in them, dont know how he did it but his baits were the hardiest I had ever saw. they were hard and frisky and warm water didnt seem to bother them.
     
  5. Shimano

    Shimano New Member

    Messages:
    195
    State:
    North Carolina
    Herring and Aelwives seem to tollerate the warmer water a little better than do gizzards and threadfins. At least thats my experience. Salt is key to keeping bait in holding and getting them to this hardy stage.