Setting centrifugle brake on baitcaster

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by SangamonCatKiller, Jan 31, 2006.

  1. SangamonCatKiller

    SangamonCatKiller New Member

    Messages:
    488
    State:
    central illinois
    .How do the veterans on here set the brake on their baitcasters? I usually put a weight similar in size to what I will be fishing with on the end and release the line. If the spool is still spinning after the weight hits the ground then I tighten the brake. If it stops imediately I loosen it to give it a very small amount of play. Are there any other effective methods for setting the brake that anyone could add to this ? I hate hitting the water only to realize my brake was set to loose and the birds nest in the reels begin to really frustrate.
     
  2. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I usually have my brake completly loose, and this is with throwing 8-ozs of lead..Occasionaly I get a back lash, but not to often.
     

  3. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Thats about it! Cant really add much more then that, except with practice you will be abel to loosen it a little more and get more distance!
     
  4. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Setting the spool that tight is actually not too good for your bearings/bushings. It puts unnecessary stress on them which causes wear. Set the spool so there is a very slight "knock" from side to side - then use the little brakes that the reel came with to help slow the reel down. The risk of backlash is not when the bait hits the water - it is in the beginning of the cast when spool speed is at it's max.

    The very best thing you can do to eliminate backlashes is work on casting technique to develop a nice smooth cast that loads the rod adequately vs just loading the tip.

    Setting spool tension too tight significantly reduces casting distance (if that is important in your fishing situation).

    A search of the forum will turn up lots of info and differing opinions on how to set your reel up properly.

    /Scott
     
  5. SangamonCatKiller

    SangamonCatKiller New Member

    Messages:
    488
    State:
    central illinois
    Well, I don't backlash often... but, I keep my brakes tight. Sounds like I need to loosen them up a little and practice like that. Thanks for your help !!
     
  6. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Something I have noticed with my baitcasters is that I always keep the spools pretty loose, ( not completely off but on the looser side) now in the daylight, I can always sense when to apply the thumb to the spool to slow the rig down and eliminate all birdsnest but I have noticed that in the dark, when I cast and I cant quite see when to thumb down, I tend to get a few more birdsnests then when I do when its daylight, another thing is that it takes practice to throw 1/2 oz on this cast, then on the next cast, put on 2 oz and use a huge sucker head as bait, it all takes time and a sense of feel as your thowing. More time casting will help.
    I suggest going to the back yard with about 3 oz of weight, and practice overhand, side arm and cross chest casting to cover all casting situations that us bank fishers run into.

    Casting practice will make you a more consistant angler as after time, you can learn to lay a bait a few inches off of a tree or learn to hook a cast or time the pendulum to land with the bait downstream for a faster sinking rate, there are all sorts of ways to get the job done, and each has its specific best cast to get the bait where it needs to be. Even in catfishing, great casting is even more important then bass fishing becuase your bait placement is critical because if its on the wrong spot, you may have wasted 20 or more minutes before you get to try again.

    Im sure folks in there trade can tell you, practice makes perfect, if your relying on a lucky cast around some limbs, then you need more practice.

    Salmonid ( who should go out and practice some more....);)
     
  7. Ohio_River_Rat

    Ohio_River_Rat New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Charlestown, Indiana
    What they say to do is set it so when you keep the rod perpendicular to your body and release the spool it drops to the ground and when it hits the spool stops spinning w/out making backlash. I usually do that then loosen up a little for extra distance.
     
  8. Blue Bruiser

    Blue Bruiser New Member

    Messages:
    200
    State:
    St Louis, Missouri
    Well depending on what it is you are worried about. When I first started using a baitcaster, I was taught to open the bail with your weight and bait on, have it just tight enough that your bait falls slowly to the ground. Then turn it a half a turn out and you are good to go. This was with a Penn 209. And I could cast that thing a good 40-50 yards.
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Releasing the line and adjusting the spool to stop when the lure hits the ground is the best way for a beginner to set his reel up without birdnesting multiple times provided he has some experience on baitcasters.
    This technique puts the beginner at a good beginning point.
    Cast 3 or 4 times and ease off repeating the process.
    If a reel manufacturer is going to put a feature on a reel I'm not supposed to use because it will damage the reel, I'll be sure to not buy that reel and pay for the feature I cant use.
     
  10. Dano

    Dano New Member

    Messages:
    13,712
    State:
    Texas
    SangamonCatKiller, That's the way I do it.
    The more casting practice you get, the less you will need the brake and use more thumb control by sound and feel. Then you can let it fly.
     
  11. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Unfortunately, IMO, the all mighty dollar is the driving force. If manufacturers told buyers how to really set up their reels for optimum performance then they wouldn't sell many reels. A good number of those that they did sell, would get returned in short order because a large part of the fishing community would not take the time to learn to cast the reel. The result - instructions to tell new users to tighten their spools down so they backlash less often and are more satisfied with the product. Captialism at it's finest :cool:

    The problem with that? On some reels - the side load created on some bearings wears them out prematurely. On other reels, it might just put a slight bow in the spool spindle putting an uneven load on the bearings, causing premature wear. Still on others, it might just cause an indendentation in the little brass spacers inside the spool tension knobs, causing the reel to loosen up, causing the user to tighten up some more, causing a bigger indentation, etc.. Still on other reels, it may not effect them at all. My point is that the best general advice to give, I think, is to set them up loose. OK OK after a VERY limited break in period with a tighter reel where the new user is educating his/her thumb - I'll concede to that.

    IMO, and yes I've said this before, the surf fishing community are the masters of the conventional community in the U.S. and the U.K. Not one knowledgeable surf fisherman that I know would advocate tightening the spool down to the point that it doesn't backlash when the weight hits the floor for an extended period - because it robs performance and causes unnecessary wear on the spool spindle and bearings/bushings.

    All I am trying to do is pass this on the folks in the catfishing community. I certainly don't expect everybody to embrace the concept, but if a few do, I'm happy :)

    That was a little long-winded - sorry :sad:

    /Scott
     
  12. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    use no brake at all on any reel for any reason. Teach your wrist and arm to load the rod and your thumb to control the spool speed. All these braking systems were invented by people with to much time on their hands and for the reason of getting more of your money.

    I could be wrong

    Danny
     
  13. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    We're losing sight of the original post here.
    I have been throwing baitcasters darn near 25 years.
    I can cast one behind my head, under my arm, and between my legs.
    I can flip and pitch with proficiency.
    I dont use brakes.

    The question posed is from someone relatively new to baitcasting.
    Someone that is going to use the braking system and needs to use it even if it does warp his spool.
    If you cast them regualry it wouldnt take long for someone to use alot less brake but depending on what you are fishing with it could take years to cast without brakes if ever
    There are no set rules in casting or using brakes, or I wouldnt know how to cast behind my head or between my legs. You use whatever is comfortable for you and in all the years I've been fishing and the years I repaired reels I've never once had to replace a bearing because it failed . I have had to replace them because folks didnt wash the salt out of them plenty of times though.

    I still Bass fish with Quantam 1310's because I like the simplicity of them.
    One I bought in 1988 the other I traded a brand new PT33P (yep you read that right) for in 1991. You know I've never replaced the first part in these reels. My catfishing reels get used 10 times more but the Bass reels have 1000's more casts on them. If you are prematurely dropping bearings or having spool problems you have a problem worse then brakes.
     
  14. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Naa - not losing sight. My message has been the same since the first time I ever posted about reel tuning. If guys that are new to casting conventional reels want to start out with their reels tightened down a bit then that's fine. It's just important to me that somebody is providing some info on how the reels should be set up - along with the recommendation that they get there as quickly as possible. Still, I'd rather see the reel slowed down with oil vs the spool tension knob.

    Tight lines...

    /Scott
     
  15. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    What he said! Most if not all baitcaster manafactures recomend setting the spool tension that way! If it was bad for the reel, they wouldnt do it!
     
  16. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    'nuff said on this subject...
     
  17. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    well here I go I agree with the facts, on reels with centrifugal they are designed to apply slight pressure to slow the spool. theise breaks are on thin pins that bend when you apply more pressure (as not to damage the reel bearings). poor maintence however can damage anything. on the other hand not all reels have theise breaks like a penn 309 209 they doo have the bearing ajustment knob (witch is in the same spot) when overtightend WILL damage the bearings. my .02
     
  18. SilverCross

    SilverCross New Member

    Messages:
    1,562
    State:
    Fairbury, Illin
    I set mine up by letting the weight drop slowly to the floor and no backlash, that is the setting I use, then I add my bait setup and throw. You have to use your thumb, but start a little tight and loosen it up. It won't take long to get use to it. Been using them for 50 years. One reel is 28 years old and still works great.
     
  19. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    Like I said I may be wrong with my earlier post but look again at what Mark J says and think of it this way,
    He could not be that good if he followed directions from different reels. He has taught his rod and thumb to do it by feel and I just bet he could pick up any reel and be good at it because he used feel.
    Hope you don't mind Mark J

    I mean really we all are correct, but for my money if I have to learn I want to learn something that will allow use of all the reels, a method I can control.

    But like I say

    I could be wrong

    Danny
     
  20. SangamonCatKiller

    SangamonCatKiller New Member

    Messages:
    488
    State:
    central illinois
    Okay, I have been using baitcasters for about 3 years now. I was taught to set them that way, had no clue that distance would be gained for loosening the brake. So I guess in a sense I am new to casting with my thumb. Thanks for all the advice!