Setting a scope

Discussion in 'Hunting Gear Talk' started by catfishhunter17, Aug 25, 2007.

  1. catfishhunter17

    catfishhunter17 New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    indiana
    has any one got any tips for me on setting scopes please let me know
     
  2. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    the easiest way that i know for setting it up is as follows.

    put level on table, and adjust till it shows being level, use paper to level the level.
    put scope on gun, and tighten it to where u can barely turn the scope itself by hand.
    set gun up in level vise, and look at the level through the scope, and turn the scope either way till the horizontal line is straight with the level.
    tighten scope.
    go to range, and sight in scope, do this with a sight in paper.
    thats it.
     

  3. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I have never used a scope level ,but i think they"re a great new innovation.
    I allways cradeled my rifle in a cutout cardboard box,set up a target at 25 yards and removed the bolt. then looked through the barrel through the reciever end and aligned the target to as close to center of bore as possible. without moving the box/gun then adjust the crosshairs till they are on center of the target. it will get you close ,then adjust to suit your needs.
     
  4. Philiagorillia

    Philiagorillia New Member

    Messages:
    296
    State:
    Missouri
    Get yourself a rifle vice, you cannot go wrong with this when mounting and zeroing a scope. Personally for larger caliber rifles with more recoil i use a lead sled but all the smaller rifles i always use my hyscore swivel shooting rest or a hyscore parallax rifle vice, they work wonders when you really wanna get dialed in good.
     
  5. catfishhunter17

    catfishhunter17 New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    indiana
    ive heard if you keep ur gun in the same location,and fire a shot all you would have to do is move your cross hairs to the whole fire another shot and it shuold be set. any heard of this?


    thanx in advance,
    Jr
     
  6. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    yeah, i've heard of doin this, but you need a gun vise to do it, and i've only seen it done on smaller caliber and semi auto weapons, the more kick you have, the more the gun is goin to move
     
  7. Luke Clayton

    Luke Clayton New Member

    Messages:
    831
    State:
    Texas
    Yes, firing a shot at 25 yards then adjusting the crosshairs to line up on the hole will get you "close" but only "close". Make sure and shoot the rifle in at 100 yards and see where you're grouping. Most centerfires, shot "on" at 25 yards, will be pretty darned close at 100.
    The most reliable way to accomplish you goal is to mount your scope, then use a bore sighter to aligh the scope with the rifle's barrel. If you don't own a boresighter, most all gun ranges have one.
    After it's bore sighted, it should be on paper at 100. Fire a 3 shot group and make adjustments as needed. Remember, most scopes nowdays have "minute of angle" adjustments.
    Here's a little quizz for you. If 4 clicks moves point of impact 1 inch at 100 yards, how many clicks at 50 yards does it take to move the bullet's point of impact the same 1 inch? It took a long time for this one to sink into my brain years ago! I will come back with the answer but I'm betting somebody will beat me to posting it... Luke Clayton
     
  8. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    what i do is put a target at you desired distance. take three shots and get a grouping, now you know where your rifle is shooting. then just adjust the scope accordingly. repeat the grouping process untill you are dead on. another option is a laser bore sighter.
     
  9. weekendredneck69

    weekendredneck69 New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    Kansas
    I like to set a target at 30 yards...Take 3 shots see where the grouping is then i align the hairs so that they are right on target left to right not up to down, because say you set your target up to 150 yards it could be right on, but if you set it to be dead on at 30 then you will just have to do more adjusting at 150, saves time and ammo!!
     
  10. Philiagorillia

    Philiagorillia New Member

    Messages:
    296
    State:
    Missouri

    Yes, this is a good way to zero in a scope, i do it alot if im in a hurry and only have access to a range that is 100yds or less. But then again i suggest if you do it this way you keep the rifle in a vice locked down.
     
  11. kkyyoottee

    kkyyoottee New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Iowa
    If 4 clicks equals 1.047 inches at a hundred yards ,50 yards would equal 50
    percent of the clicks, 70 yards would be 70% and so on and so forth. So how about 8 clicks?
     
  12. Wallbass

    Wallbass New Member

    Messages:
    334
    State:
    Indiana
    Well if I remember its 8 clicks
     
  13. Wallbass

    Wallbass New Member

    Messages:
    334
    State:
    Indiana
    ooooooooooPs To late DARNIT
     
  14. Repete

    Repete New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    Illinois
    It would be 4 clicks @ 100, 8 clicks @ 75, 12 clicks @ 50 and 16 clicks @ 100.
     
  15. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Luke wouldn't that depend on where the scope's parallax is adjusted?
    Big smile back at ya...LOL. You (we) got em all thinking now.....
     
  16. Philiagorillia

    Philiagorillia New Member

    Messages:
    296
    State:
    Missouri
    I've noticed everyone is saying, well its gonna be "so many clicks for so many yards", thats gonna depend on weather or not the scopes increments are in 1/2, 1/4, or 1/8th moa (minute of angle). Go here, it will explain this pretty well and might be of some help http://www.abousainc.com/SightIn.htm
     
  17. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    First buy you several pairs of cheap cotton gloves so that you can have clean gloves to clean and handle your guns with.Salt from sweat is a terrible enemy to your gun.My way for 22 rime fire,through 300 wby.to 45-70 center fire.Now you have to be able to hit a target.It can be as big as a barn or 6 in.square,but you have to be able to hit it.The secret is getting your rifle back exactly where it was when you shot.You line the cross hairs back up as you did before shooting the first shot,do not move your gun while you adjust your cross hairs to center on bullet hole.If you did it all perfect,you done it with one shot.Nice but a miracle.Just keep doing it the same till you got it.A lot has to do with your shooting and your rifles grouping as the barrel heats up.Few have the patience to let their barrel cool.Stand it with the bolt open in the shade for a few minutes.Many sight in with a gun and ammo stored in the hot summer sun and then hunt in cold weather.Some guns and ammo are badly affected by this.All are to some extent.Reverse from cold to hot works the same.I once saw a man on a hot southern day,sighting in a new rifle,by puting it back in a huge cooler full of ice between each shot.He had something on the ice to keep the gun dry.He would read a book for a while until it cooled and shoot one shot again.He had a time with that scope fogging.He would put on a long sleeve cotton shirt and cotton gloves to keep the sweat off his gear.Said he was going for moose,sheep and bear in Alaska where it was cold and the shots were long.Smart man in my book.A few guns group all over the place,but will put the first shot in exactly the same place every time,every day with a cold barrel.Great gun in my book.First shot is 98% in my experience.
     
  18. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I've tried all the different methods explained in here. They all work to a degree to get the gun close at 100 yards. Usually a bore sight tool will just get you on paper at that distance. I've known people who bought a new gun and scope and used a bore sighter to sight it in. They then couldn't figure out why they missed the deer. THEY NEVER SHOT THE GUN AFTER BORE SIGHTING IT!

    You have to actually shoot the gun after it is bore sighted, whichever method you use. That's the only way you can truley sight it in. The best method I've found is to bore sight it, try it at 25 yards to get it close to the bullseye, then take it out to 100 and fine tune it.