Saving money on braided lines

Discussion in 'Fishing Line Review' started by AZflats, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    It is a real pet peeve of mine to always have fresh braided line on my reels that wont give way when if I hook up with a big fish... Because braided line is so darn expensive, here is one way I can save a little money and not waste line when I don't have to...

    > Never buy 150 yard spools of braided line.. If you are using Ambassador reels, they can only take about 90 yards of 80# and about 120 yards of 65#. You end up leaving line on the spool that is not long enough to use on another rig and usually has to be thrown away...

    ~ The tackle store I shop at has bulk line and can sell you as much as you need. I will usually go and buy a 600-800 yard spool of braided line. That way I can use what I need 6-8 times before I see the end and only have to deal with a shorted spool once... Also, you can save money when you buy it in bulk.. Most braid is about 12-14 cents per yard if you buy it pre-packed in 150 yard spools, but if you can buy it in bulk, you can usually get it for 8-10 cents per yard..

    * Recently I bought a 600 yard spool of 80# P-line braid for $48.00 it would have cost me almost $80 if I bought smaller spools of it...

    ~A
     
  2. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    One more, and I am sure folks do this.. But instead of stripping off the old line for the trash can.. Use another reel of similar line capacity and real the old line onto the other reel.. Most likely, the line reeled up into the old spool has never seen the light of day. So it is as good as new...

    * Put a piece of paper on the spool before you put the line on to indicate this was done, so the transfer only happens once.

    Thanks~:wink:
     

  3. azcataholic

    azcataholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    State:
    arizona
    Thanks Andy, excellent thought. With me getting more familiar with what is needed I know I can save money now. Initially I would buy braid,mono different #lb 150yd spools spending 12 to 15 bucks a shot. I am ready now with what I have learned to buy in bulk. One question, when guys say to put a bed of mono on the reel so as to not have the braid bury within itself do you tie to the mono or to the reel? You have helped me save on hooks already, i have #10 and #7 hooks I bought in bulk whereas initially i would pick up packs of this and that. Thanks,Mike
     
  4. AZflats

    AZflats New Member

    Messages:
    2,535
    State:
    Peoria, Arizona
    Hi Mike,

    The mono backing is not to prevent the braid from burring itself.. The mono backing is to prevent the braid from spinning when the main spool is not and allow it to bite and only spin with your drag...

    * If you have to pull out a snag and you put too much tension on the reel, the braid will dig into itself.. Just pull out about 10 yards or so and reel it back in.. If you don't do that you will get a surprise the next time you cast and probably loose your bait..

    * I will use about 10 feet of 20 lb mono as a backing.. Tie an Arbor knot to the spool with the backing, then tie a Albright knot to connect the backing to the braid.

    * Hope this helps!
     
  5. azcataholic

    azcataholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    State:
    arizona
    Yep after a snag, my next cast i have sent my rig 20 yards and my bluegill 30 yards.Man that hurts when you're low on gills. Thanks, Mike
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Transferring your braided line from one reel to another is certainly a simple way to save $$$, but it's only possible if you have a reel of the same line capacity. If you need to swap ends and keep the line on the same reel, here's a way to do it. Get a couple of wooden dowels about a foot long; pieces of broom or mop handles will work just fine. Get 4 fairly stout nails and cut the heads off; I generally use 16p or 20p, because I usually have that size on hand. Drill holes in each end of the dowels just a little smaller than the diameter of the nails. Drive the point end of the nails into the holes; the pilot hole keeps the dowel from splitting, and the smaller size makes a firm fit. Use a nail to attach a dowel to an electric drill and wind the line off the reel onto the dowel. Remove that dowel from the drill and insert the other dowel. Have someone hold the first dowel by the two nails and wind the line onto the second dowel. Holding the first dowel by the two nails allows it to spin easily. Wind the line back onto the reel. It's now reversed.
     
  7. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    Ill remember that for my trout rods, gonna be going on 3 years the same line. I just strip off a few feet and retie. Fireline rocks.
     
  8. motard1

    motard1 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    TEXAS
    Great ideas guys.