Savage .22lr help

Discussion in 'Small Game Hunting' started by catchaser19, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. catchaser19

    catchaser19 New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    UTAH
    I have a savage model # 161f it is roughly 5 years old. I have cleaned the gun and maintained it according to the manual but now every time i take it out i only get 4 or 5 to fire out of a 10 round clip. The firing pin hits it hard enough to put a decent dent in the casing. My buddies rifle fires all the same rounds that my rifle had a very hard time with. Whats the deal can anybody tell me. Thanx
     
  2. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    It could be a couple of things one the cheaper promo ammo sometimes lacks the full primer mix in the rims but usually only one out of a few hundred do this so im thinking your firing pin spring is either weak or dirty try soaking the bolt in a tub with cleaning solvent then blowing it out real good if that doesnt work id take it to a reputible gunsmith
     

  3. catchaser19

    catchaser19 New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    UTAH
    Thanx i will try that.
     
  4. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    catchaser19,

    There are several issues that can affect ignition on .22 rimfire weapons.

    First, cleaning. The nature of most wax-lubed projectiles and low ignition propellants leaves tons of residue in every nook and cranny of a rimfire action. Relative to ignition, I would suggest looking in the chamber from the breech end with a strong light, to see if there is a buildup of powder and wax that is causing the round to not chamber fully. A rimfire shell headspaces on the rim at the breech. If there is sufficient dirt in the chamber to allow the driving band on the projectile to stop against the forcing cone, and it holds the case rim away from the breech any amount at all, the firing pin energy is expended in driving the case forward against the dirt instead of crushing the primer to set off the ignition. In this case, a good cleaning is in order, using a solvent like Hoppes on a patch, letting it sit to soak (remove the action from the stock) and loosen/dissolve the residue. Then follow with a bore brush, twisted by hand in the chamber only. Do this from the breech end, or you can damage the rifling. Finish with a complete bore cleaning as usual. You can carefully check with a new shell to see if the rim touches the breech - it should drop all the way in without force and fall out again on its own. Use the bore cleaning rod to push the round out of the chamber from the muzzle end if it is stuck.

    Second, dry firing damage. After a thorough cleaning, visually inspect the breech in the area of the firing pin. If there is an indentation in the breech face, then the weapon has been dryfired (not a good thing for most rimfires). This will cause a little metal to swell into the chamber bore at the breech and again create a condition where the case rim is held away from the breech. Additionally, if you find this condition, the firing pin may show signs of having struck the steel breech, changing the shape of the firing pin's striking end and therefor the ignition characteristics on firing. This condition is usually best corrected by a gunsmith, by replacing or reshaping the firing pin AND ironing out the breech bore raised metal to original Sporting Arms and Ammuniton Manufacturers Institute specifications. This is not something you want to do yourself.

    Third, you may have a weak or broken firing pin or striker spring. This will be the fix if there is absolutely no evidence of residue or breech deformation. A gunsmith can replace this as well.

    If you are not comfortable with tearing into the weapon, please see a reputable gunsmith, for your own safety and for those you will be with when firing the weapon.

    Dennis
     
  5. catchaser19

    catchaser19 New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    UTAH
    Wow you must read alot like i do i had no idea about the wax and the snug against the breech wow i will surely look into that THANX.
     
  6. jdstraka

    jdstraka Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,721
    State:
    Council Bluffs, Iowa
    Name:
    John
    That was GREAT Advice Dennis!! God Bless Brother. J.D.
    :0a31: :0a31: :0a31:
     
  7. pythonjohn

    pythonjohn New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,533
    State:
    F L A Swamps
    Dennis,
    Thanks for that post.
     
  8. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    I just reread my post and I am getting lax-

    FIRST STEP IS ALWAYS TO START WITH AN UNLOADED WEAPON!!!!!!!!

    I've built and repaired a few small caliber firearms, in a 10-year part time gunsmithing business. It was kind of a natural thing to do when I was a toolmaker/machinist and enjoyed competetitve handgunning. Got to mess with some bigger stuff (over .50) in some development projects. I've been out of the gun repair business for about 20 years now, but the .22 rimfire problems with feeding and ignition were always pretty common. Any piece of precision machinery (firearm, fishing reel, boat motor, watch, turbine engine, aircraft...wife, kid) needs to be clean and well-adjusted to function safely.

    Dennis