sardine info needed

Discussion in 'ALL OTHER FISH' started by BREEZE1, Oct 15, 2009.

  1. BREEZE1

    BREEZE1 New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    SOUTH CAROLINA
    Are all sardines salt water fish or are some fresh water fish? Now I’ve red that a sardine isn’t a fish, its just some small fish around 4 inches of a few specific breeds. I’m interested in how I could catch my own and make sardines. Yeah it would be cheaper and quicker to go buy some, but I think it would be cool to have some sardines that you caught and prepared your self. Does any one have any info on this? :eek:oooh:
     
  2. ammo warrior

    ammo warrior Member

    Messages:
    868
    State:
    Columbia, MO
    Dude, I have no idea about the sardines. But I know that I like to eat them...gudluk :roll_eyes:
     

  3. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    I know this family who used to keep some type of small freshwater fish and either pickle it or can it in brine. They got their fish out of freshwater creeks, so I'm thinking it was small chubs or suckers. Wish I could tell you more.
     
  4. SouthGADan

    SouthGADan New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Lyons, GA
  5. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    It sounds like most sardines are made from various species of saltwater herring. One big secret is to use canning salt when making sardines. I don't see canning salt on the shelves of grocery stores much anymore, today it's simply called non-iodized salt. Anything canned in iodized salt is prone to be mushy, whether it be meat or vegetable products.

    I wouldn't recommend using skipjack herring, or most species of freshwater shad, which are all cousins to saltwater and brackish water herring and American Shad. But I know people on the east coast used to pickle the alewife, which is also in the family. Alewives from brackish water would probably make decent sardines. Does anyone know?

    Some people still eat the American Shad, which is a big cut above the bait shad tablewise. However, since sardines are always canned on the smallish size, I don't know what the size limit is on the American Shad, which reach at least 30" and have become endangered in some waters.

    I'm getting off the subject, but crappie, walleye, sucker, bluegill, and bass can be pickled. The best thing to do is to just to jump in there and experiment. :wink:
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2009