Sangamon River help - Illinois regulations run around

Discussion in 'ILLINOIS RIVERS TALK' started by rat fink, May 25, 2006.

  1. rat fink

    rat fink New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    illinois
    hi guys im kinda new to set lining and i have tryed to get the regs info from the horses mouth but all i get is transfred and after 30min i get fed up and hang up if aney one knows the regs 4 the sanagmon river on trot, limb and ancored jugs i would be verey gratful thanks
     
  2. astutzman

    astutzman New Member

    Messages:
    243
    State:
    Collinsville, IL
    There aren't any site specific regulations in the book for the Sangamon River, so if it's legal in Illinois it's legal on the river. Limb lines are illegal all over the state though, so I'd stay away from them. You should be fine with trotlines though.

    Hope this helps.
     

  3. rat fink

    rat fink New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    illinois
    thats all i wanted why count the state just say that thanks a lot not to be a pest but what about bobby poles and ancored jugs ???
     
  4. rat fink

    rat fink New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    illinois
    aney one !? :choler: as i said in my last posts i cant get the info or more over i dont have the patence to deal with the hold musick for more than 30 min from the state and im kinda wanting to try these out but i cant afford a $400 fine {and sorry about being a litil inpatiance so this is with all due respect}
     
  5. Doyle

    Doyle New Member

    Messages:
    582
    State:
    Illinois
    Your best bet is to buy an Illinois fishing licence, use two poles with no more than two hooks on a pole and fish away. Catch a big one! Bank poles, limb lines, trot lines, hoop nets, shockers, dynimite, and anchored jugs are for a time long past when there were only a few million fishermen instead of 10 of millions fishermen.
     
  6. dademoss

    dademoss New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Ohio
  7. rat fink

    rat fink New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    illinois
    well i like the days of my grandfather it was a lot more fun and thanks fore the link my computer cant load aney thing but the contence but its the thought that counts witch goes to show boc is one of the most hospitibal places that i have ever been
     
  8. Skunk Master

    Skunk Master New Member

    Messages:
    3,366
    State:
    Colinsville, Il
    Rat Fink... Jugs and Trot Lines have to have your name and address on them.. No more than 25 hooks to a trot line.. 50 Hook Limit per person.. Tro Lines and Jugs have to be run at least once every 24 hrs... No throw lines, Limb Lines, Bank Lines, or Drop Lines allowed in Illinois.. 2 Pole Limit with no more than 2 hooks per pole... So Throw lines, Jugs, and Poles have to all be added together and cannot exceed 50 hooks per person.. Hope that explains it for you... I know it sucks when other states you can have 15 poles in boat and fish limb lines and all the other stuff...
     
  9. Driver

    Driver New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Illinois
    You can have more than 25 hooks on a trot line and throw lines and bank lines...

    From the 2006 IL DNR Fishing Digest -

    Page 6 under the "Sportfishing License" Section -

    ...Devices permitted by the sport fishing license include: bank pole and line, dip net, throw line, trot line, buoyed device (jug fishing), or other legal devices not exceeding 50 hooks in total (except as noted under Ice Fishing section). Also permitted are legal-sized cast nets, shad scoops and minnow seines for bait fishing. Smelt may be taken in Lake Michigan with legal size dip nets, gill nets and seines. Two untagged sport fishing devices are allowed; each device in excess of two must be tagged with the angler's name and address. If attached to a tree, the device must be attached only to the main trunk below the water line...

    Page 5 under the "Illegal Devices" Section -

    ...Use of the following devices in the taking of aquatic life is prohibited: electricity or electrical devices; lime; acid; medical, chemical or mechanical compounds; dope; drugs; fishberry; dynamite; nitroglycerine or other explosive; snare; treated grain; firearms; air gun; gas gun; wire basket; wire seine; wire net; wire trotline or limb lines of any kind...

    Where folks get confused is many (most?) of the waters of Illinois have more restrictive regulations than the statewide regulations. All the restrictions and waters are listed in the fishing digest. These more restrictive regulations are refered to as "Site Specific Regulations". One of these regulations is called "2 Pole and Line Fishing Only". When a body of water has "2 pole and Line Fishing Only" listed under it's "Site Specific Regulations" then Anglers must not use more than 2 poles and each pole must not have more than 2 hooks or lures attached while fishing... (Page 9, Site Specific Rule #1). The Sangamon River is not listed under Site Specific Rules, so it should be wide open to trots, drops and banks.

    I suggest that you get a 2006 Fishing Digest (Available online at the IL DNR site or from Fishing Lic. retailers) and look for yourself.

     
  10. rat fink

    rat fink New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    illinois
    you guys / gals of boc are my heros!!!!!! i got more info in 2 days on boc than a week with idnr thanhs a lot
     
  11. Graywolf

    Graywolf New Member

    Messages:
    136
    State:
    Peru, IL.
    What I don't understand is, you can have a trout line but not a limb line. I can't see any difference????
    Course I am thick headed!!!!:angry:
     
  12. Skunk Master

    Skunk Master New Member

    Messages:
    3,366
    State:
    Colinsville, Il
    Yeah and limb lines are safer, not out in water like jugs for boats to run over...:crazy:
     
  13. Driver

    Driver New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Illinois
    Considering limb lines and why they are illegal, ponder this...

    Someone runs limb lines on a smallish river or stream like the Sangamon or Mackinaw this weekend. Folliage is still pretty sparce while they run their 50 or less lines. Somewhere along the way they lose track of a line or two and leave them hang when they pack up...

    Here I come on a sultry night in August when the river has dropped 4' from current levels and in places it's a jungle from the overhanging brush, trees and LIMBS. As I let the current slide my jon boat along the banks and through the folliage from one hole to the next, I end up "finding" one of the limb lines. Having a 2/0 stainless O'Shaughnessy buried past the barb in your shoulder ain't a pretty sight. It's an even worse sight when the hook is attached to 100# Dacron tied off to an unforgiving Mother of all oak limbs. All the while the current is still movin the little 12' jon along and all one can think about is dropping anchor, cutting the line to the hook and hunting down the %$#&*!@) that left that limb line.

    Yep, I cut every limb line I come across - baited, unbaited, with fish, without fish...doesn't matter.
     
  14. rat fink

    rat fink New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    illinois
    that wount be fun good thing there is no real brush where i fish so i use well i call them bobby polls becouse thats what my grandfather called them and he taught me how to fish but thats besides the point bobby pols are safer becouse you arnt as apt to leave one behind as just a lime line and mine are yelow and coverd with refitive tapefor visibility
     
  15. Catmaster81

    Catmaster81 New Member

    Messages:
    33
    State:
    Illinois
    Gentlemen,

    I'm 24 years old, and I've been fishing for cats since I was a little boy, both with rod and reel and with set lines. I've lived in a few different states now, and I think Illinois really has a good set of laws on set lines. I agree with the previous post about limb lines.. although they can be very convenient, they are dangerous, and have snagged me a few times and caused me a great deal of pain. Properly set trotlines are virtually unseen and remain on the bottom of the river clear of boats and anglers. Bank poles or bobby poles, serve the same purpose as limb lines, but just require more work to cut and stick the pole. They are much safer, as they are generally more visible and are closer to the bank and out of the main channel where boats run. Typically, we set out about 35 bank poles and 2-3 trotlines to catfish on the river where I'm from. When we're done fishing for the trip, we remove all of the bait, and the hooks from the bank poles. If you use a swivel (barrel or snap, your preference) you can keep the poles out there for use at a later date with little maintenance. In other states where I've lived, you end up being able to use fewer hooks, and they allow the use of dangerous limb lines which can harm humans and wildlife. The only tweak I would make to Illinois laws is probably cut the number of hooks per license down to 35 or 40 hooks. Otherwise, I find set lining an enjoyable and safe practice.