Running lights & canoes

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Scott Daw, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    Since we're required to run lights at night and I want to take a canoe out at night. How would I run the lights? is there one specific for canoes and will i need a big battery to run em or one of those square batteries used for the extra large flashlights be good enough?
     
  2. floundahman

    floundahman New Member

    Messages:
    564
    State:
    North Caro
    Scott, Wal-Mart sells a red and green Bow light that looks like a flashlight mounted on a clamp. I have one because I used to fish from a canoe at night. It takes 2 D batteries. They also have a clamp on stern light about 4' tall. I don't know how that one is powered.
     

  3. navigator

    navigator New Member

    Messages:
    199
    State:
    NC- Brunswick County
    I know here in NC (I thought those laws were federal) if you don't have a gas motor and are under a certain number of feet (18) you only have to have a hand held light.


    if you must though, they have some that clamp on with C/D batteries that you can get. that is likely what I would do.
     
  4. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
  5. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    There are all sorts of solutions to the light problem with canoes and kayaks. In Texas, the state requires a white 360 light. I've seen people take a regular flashlight, tape it to a piece of pvc pipe, use a cup or cap off a squeeze tube of hair product taped to the lighted end, and call that a 360 light. If your state has no requirements for lighting canoes and kayaks, all the Coast Guard requires is a light to shine should you see/hear another boat.

    The clamp on lights from Wally World and elsewhere work with a canoe, but the main problem is the short battery life. If, like me, when you fish at night, you stay until morning, you need to carry extra batteries. Hopefully, someone will come out with an LED solution other than the flashlight one I mentioned.
     
  6. neocats

    neocats New Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    State:
    Steubenvil
    In ohio all you need is the white light of a lantern on a non-motorized vesssel.
     
  7. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Be seen.Buy extra bulbs and batteries to fit your light.Remove the bulb and grease the socket with a little electrical grease or Vaseline and reinstall the bulb.This prevents corrosion.I love you brothers and sisters.Peewee
     
  8. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    The link I posted is for LED running lights.
     
  9. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)

    Thanks, I didn't know they were selling them yet. I just need the 360 light, hopefully, they'll come out with just that one.
     
  10. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Last time I was out in the warmth of summer my buddy had clamp on Tikki torches, with the bug oil in em. Little light, and kept the sceeters off too.
    I never thought of it.
    :wink:
     
  11. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Jerry, they have them priced individually...you can order just the white light.
     
  12. chipblevins

    chipblevins New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    salem, va
    they run on d batterys also i use them on my canoe
     
  13. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    I like em. Thank you all
     
  14. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    I haven't checked the rules in a long time, but at one time I had a canoe, and was not required to have lights, since it was not mechanically powered.
    I'm not sure if that's still the case, but you might want to check to be sure.
    Now, I'm not advocating getting out on the water at night without lighting, where other boats might be. I would definitely want to be visible to other boats. I used my canoe in an oxbow lake and the river back then, but boat traffic at night in those days was almost nil. I just carried a flashlight, and if I did hear a boat, I would turn on that light. I even had a game warden paddle up to me once, and he was in a small boat without lights, too.
    Of course, we're in a new age now, with new laws, so be careful, obey the laws, and do what makes sense for safety.
     
  15. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    It goes state by state. The Coast Guard only requires a hand held light to be used if another boat is nearby, to avoid collision. Texas adds a requirement for all craft, regardless of size, if running at night, to have a white 360 light. Other states go only by the CG requirement, some have even more requirements. Whether your state requires it or not. the 360 stern light is a good idea, mount it on at least a 36" pole.
     
  16. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    checked the PA fish & boat commission website. they say for a manually powered boat:

    I need a white light either hand held or installed ready to be displayed in time to avoid collision. the diagram (7a) shows a guy in a row boat with a flashlight.

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]NIGHT OPERATION AND LIGHTS[/FONT]

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]All vessels must show required running lights between the hours of sunset and sunrise and during periods of restricted visibility, such as fog and heavy rain. A sailboat operating under power and sail must display the proper running lights for a powerboat. Navigation lights are restricted to the colors red, green and white. No lights of any type except for the required navigation lights may be displayed. Navigation lights are designed to identify the type of boat and its situation (underway, direction of travel, at anchor, etc.) on the water. Boats underway include drifting boats. Night boaters should carry spare bulbs, fuses, batteries, and a flashlight.[/FONT]
    [​IMG]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]The navigation lights required for boats are determined by the boat's length and whether it is powered by machinery, sail, paddles or oars.[/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]The charts on this page show which lights are required.[/FONT]
    [​IMG]
    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Geneva,Swiss,SunSans-Regular]Anchor Lights: All boats must display an all-around anchor light between sunset and sunrise and during periods of restricted visibility when anchored in or near a channel, and when in an anchorage not designated as a special anchorage area. In addition, Pennsylvania regulations require all boats to display an all-around anchor light when they are anchored where other vessels normally navigate. This includes all boatable Commonwealth waters. The all-around light must be one meter higher than the colored lights and be displayed where it can best be seen.[/FONT]
     
  17. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    I have a set of those for my Coleman Scanoe. They both work off 2 D cells and clamp fore and aft. I believe the other post is right. If you don't have a motor, you don't need running lights.