Run the battery down on purpose?

Discussion in 'Boating' started by Pacman, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. Pacman

    Pacman New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    South Carolina
    I have got conflicting advice from fishing buddies about batteries. Some say that if you run the battery all the way down, it will never completely recover. So keep it charged.

    Others say you should turn on the lights and deliberately run the battery down occasionally to prevent "memory failure". Who's right?

    Most of the batteries I have had to replace was my own fault. "Maintenance Free" does not mean never check the water level. They should really be called " Low Maintenance".
     
  2. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    I buy the 2yr warrenty and thats about what I get myself......2 yrs and they are giong bad or ready to.....I have done both and I will be darned if I know but I am gonna watch this post sos I can learn to..........Them babys do get expensive
     

  3. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    There is lots of conflicting "advice" out there about batteries.My advice to you is to not take any advice.:smile2: Go to the TROJAN Battery website and you will find all the accurate information you need.The other companies have websites also but I am familiar with this one ,so I recommend it.Depends on if the battery is a deep cycle or starting and the type of construction,ie wetcell,AGM or GEL.DEEP cycles are made to dischage many times and that includes full discharges,other types are not.Get the facts,not "advice" and act accordingly.If you go to the library or search button on here you will find ton of info also.:smile2:
     
  4. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,710
    State:
    Independen
    The best advice is to keep them fully charged all of the time. If the battery sits without a full charge, then you will see the "memory" problems. Mine get charged when I'm done fishing, and even if they've sat for a few weeks or a month I'll hook them back up for a little while.
     
  5. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    I only buy sealed batteries. Install them and forget them. I do no service don't even clean connections. Sealed is all I have used since sears came out with Die hard. I have never had a battery problem except ageing I buy 6 year batteries and replace them all when 1 gets weak. The batteries in my 2000 journey were made active in 1999. At 9 years old they work like new.

    I no longer use sears brand. I buy all my batteries at a medical supply store. I believe them to be built heavy, very heavy. They must take a beating for outdoor wheelchair use. Kind of like golf cart batteries are built heavy.
     
  6. Pacman

    Pacman New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    South Carolina
    A side benefit of this post is that I learned that we have a "search" function. I never noticed it before. Thanks!!!!
     
  7. Pacman

    Pacman New Member

    Messages:
    141
    State:
    South Carolina
    I took your advice and went to manufacturers sites & found this info.

    "Does my deep cycle battery develop a memory?
    Lead acid batteries do not develop any type of memory. This means that you do not have to deep discharge or completely discharge a battery before recharging it. For optimum life and performance, we generally recommend a discharge of 20 to 50% of the battery’s rated capacity even though the battery is capable of being cycled to 80%."

    The "memory" effect is not true for lead-acid batteries. It is however true for Ni-Cd batteries (cell phones, laptops, etc.). It is good for them to run all the way down before recharging.
     
  8. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    I use to work next door to a battery store. I learned from them if you run your battery down it will kill a cell or 2 or more. The fable about running your battery down to the ground was created by the battery companies. As soon as it starts to die, recharge it.
     
  9. pinsley

    pinsley New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    VA
    The best practice is to keep them as fully charged as possible at all times. I keep mine on a trickle charger, but solar panels are also good if you can afford them. The output is low (compared to a normal charger), but they are gentler on the batteries and can stay hooked up (with a charge controller) all the time.
     
  10. dookiechrist

    dookiechrist New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    utah
    yep, you can and will kill a lead acid battery very quickly if you run it down and charge it, especially if you continuously repeat. and on the same note for those who often jump start their vehicles, your alternator/generator is not designed to "charge" your battery , just maintain its charge. you can easily ruin your alternator by relying on it to charge your battery. if you must jump start a vehicle it is best to let it charge of the other persons vehicle for as long as possible .( it wont hurt their stuff as much as it will yours). a trickle charger or battery tender is a very good idea, it is considered normal for a battery to lose 1% of its charge per day while just sitting. and if you haven't read the warning labels on you battery, keep in a well ventalated area, batteries produce hydrogen gas while charging ( ever here of the h-bomb?)...uummmmm... i guess i got a little off track, imo, keep as close to a full charge as possible on them:roll_eyes:
     
  11. dwidder

    dwidder New Member

    Messages:
    11
    State:
    MO
    The best advice I can give is to always recharge after use. If I can't to hook up the battery after a trip to the lake (sometimes when camping there aren't any hookups), I'll always get the battery on the charger as soon as I can.
     
  12. riverdasher

    riverdasher New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Washington
    Learned alot from you guys