Rose bush leaves

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by sds888, Mar 25, 2007.

  1. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    Our Roses are puting out very same leaves this year anybody know why? Also at the end of last year our roses lost there color. The deep red lincoln was a light shad of pink. Most of the other ones were putting out white roses. Thanks
    Stephen
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    It may be that the roses tend to cross breed, for lack of a better word. You are supposed to keep the different colors separated by a goodly distance. White roses planted in close proximity to a red rose will turn pink, and the red will get lighter. It supposedly keeps going like this until all your roses are the same color. All that is a wives tale I have heard over the years, but I believe it to be true. LOL
     

  3. Tala

    Tala Guest


    I've heard something very similar to this, years ago. I don't if it's true...but I've always believed it.
     
  4. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    Thanks I will have to have a little talk to the roses about all this breeding going on in the front yard. I but some new mulch around them and cut them back they are Starting to look better.
     
  5. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    by cross-breeding its of course certain that new varieties of roses can come about, as with anything. this aspect of the gardening hobby is perhaps most practiced by day lilly growers or at least in my experience with dealing with them. keep in mind in that aspect we are talking about actual deliberate cross-breeding of varieties. having a bed full of various roses and expecting them to all end up the same color is bizarre to say the least. absolutely illogical and to best of my knowledge impossible.
    my rose beds have red, burgundy, white, pink, and yellow all planted together and each is an individual. that beds been there six years. my grandmothers rose bed? 30 plus years i can testify to for fact at least and they too are all individuals and colors as pure as the day they were planted.

    i have this strange feeling someone somewhere forgot what got planted where. LOL

    :lol:
     
  6. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    havent forgotten wher i planted what I have each has a name card next to and I have been dealing with roses for about twenty years never seen anything like it. I know what the cross breeding is and your right cross breeding is to make a seed of a differnt type but there coulod be something sceintificlly speaking not found yet about the roses and there color and how each one relates to another in a very close enviroment. May have to see what happens this year and then come up with hyposises. thanks
    Stephen
     
  7. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    I've heard that roses are grafted to another type of root stock, such as a hardier breed of rose, or even a berry bush. It's to make the roots tougher. But sometimes, if the rose is cut off below the graft, or if the rose part of the plant dies, then whatever the original stalk is from will take over. Just a thought...
     
  8. Hope

    Hope New Member

    Messages:
    1,177
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Stephen,

    I was just reading something about hydrangeas.. that their flowers will be either pink or blue, depending on the soil's Ph... blue from acidic soil and pink from alkaline. This was news to me!

    Do you suppose the fading of your rose colors... both blooms and leaf changes... might be related to Ph as well? I've never gotten into all this, but just might check into a soil Ph test kit. First I have to cut these leggy rose bushes back before they take over the whole area :eek:oooh:

    Good luck and happy gardening :lol:
     
  9. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    so true about the hydrangeas. add lime to encourage pink, iron to encourage blue. ive always planted a few old nails along with the hydrangeas at planting time to keep them blue.

    on today's Neil Sperry program (well known texas master gardener and horticultural guru) a caller asked about roses changing. the answer was that the rose was either pruned at one point below the graft union or over time due to disease or dieback the grafted stock had since died out and all that was left was the original rootstock. this original rootstock will be different from the graft stock and can either be a completely different color rose or a variety of rose that doesnt bloom at all.
     
  10. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    I've also changed the color of my hydrangeas. This only works with the "old fashioned" ones. Some of the newer hybrids keep their colors. But I had one that bloomed pink; I put ammonium sulfate(a powder at the garden center) around it & watered it & pretty soon the flowers turned the prettiest blue. Then I missed a year & suddenly I had green flowers! They wouldn't turn all the way back to blue--sure were funny looking. I've since transplanted two other plants from my original to another spot in the yard. One has been pink & one has been purple!! These are absolutely my favorite flower---nostalgic, I guess. I remember them when I was a kid; everybody's old homeplace had them.
     
  11. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    I like the hydrandas as well and changing there color I have a really big one at this house but I havent tried to change its color yet. I will keep you posted about the color of this year we are starting to get buds. I think the mulch is really going to help.
    Stephen
     
  12. Hope

    Hope New Member

    Messages:
    1,177
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Well, I finally got one :smile2: .... hydrangea, that is. My first. I don't think they grow too well up north, so they're not something you see around folks' gardens, but this one was sittin there all by its lonesome at Lowes - in full blue bloom - and I couldn't resist. Had to dig up this thread to recall the details.

    Roxie, I dunno for sure, but I doubt this is the "old fashioned" variety...
    its name is "Endless Summer" - aka Hydrangea macrophylla, "Bailmer" (PPAF) - whatever that means :confused2: Oh, wait! Says here inside the tag: pink blooms in alkaline soil, blue blooms in acidic soil. Also says it has the "unique ability to bloom consistently on both old and new wood".

    Thought this was interesting, too... a little tag around the base stem has this warning: Patent variety. Asexual reproduction using scions, buds, or cuttings is strictly prohibited by US Plant Patent Laws. Now there's something I'd never thunk about :roll_eyes:

    Anyhow, I'm excited! and we'll see whether/what sort of color changes we get outta this one! And now... to dig... the hole! :cool2:
     
  13. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    Great, Hope! Just be sure you have it in some shade, especially in the hot afternoon. And they love lots of water when it gets hot & dry. Late in the summer, it's not unusual for me to give mine a drink every evening. They will droop when hot, but don't let it scare you. They perk right up after a cool sip!
     
  14. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    Your roses may just need a bit of rose food .Color change can be symptomatic of soil PH as Hope said.For the Hydrangeas use MIRACID on them occasionally if you want them to remain bright blue.MIRACID is also the prefered feed for Azaleas and Camelias as they both prefer acidic soil.:big_smile::smile2: