riverjon transom replacment what works best?

Discussion in 'Boat Repair Help' started by biga, Jan 2, 2008.

  1. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    my river jons transom wood is rotting away pretty bad and i am needing to replace it before i hand a new motor on it.. what is the best fix / marine plywood glued with the grain crossed or a 2x12? open to ideas just need to fix it right so i ccan hang a 50 hp on it..
     
  2. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    I would use ply criss crossed grain to get it strong as you can.
     

  3. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    thats the way i was thinking it should be but i wanted to make sure no one had a better idea..
     
  4. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Have you checked the price of Marine plywood recently?
    I need to replace mine too.
    Somewhere on the BOC is a discussion I had with some members. I think the best idea is outdoor ply of the correct thickness thoroughly coated with epoxy and held in place with stainless steel screws.
    I'll take a look for that thread when I get time.
     
  5. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Its under "help with the transom" in the Boating section.
    Don't know where I thought it was coated in epoxy.

    Perhaps I read it in another thread or even another site but they said don't coat the bottom edge so moisture will not be trapped.

    the best to ya
    just
     
  6. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    In 1988 I replaced the transom on a 14' Sea Nymph with a piece of rough cut oak. We built a barn in 86 with all roughcut wood. I had a lot left over, [still do have some] and it is still on the back of that boat. My nephew has that boat now, with a 25 Merc on it. All I did was use a piece of 1" x 8" clear oak board and painted with some oil base enamel, nothing special. Oak is strong as anything, the older it gets, the harder it gets. Those little round steel deals on the ends of your motor screws wont even dig in or dent oak.

    If there is a sawmill around where you are at, you can get a piece cheap, as all you need is roughcut lumber. You don't need it planned for a transom. I imagine any good hardwood would work, whatever the sawmill has. Then paint it good with a oil base enamel, Lowes has some good cheap enamel for about 12 dollars a gallon. I used some off it with sand sprinkled in it to cover two decks I added to my boat last year. Hey don't laugh, there cheap enamel is good stuff. Tough as all get out and I can just pressure wash the inside out. My 3500 psi washer doesnot hurt it.
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    About 5 or 6 years back, I replaced the wood on the transom of my 1648 Lowe Bigjon with a piece of 2" x 10" untreated scrap oak. No sign of deterioration, even though the boat is stored out in the weather. Personally, I think the ideal wood would be a piece of 2" x 10" cypress, since the cypress naturally resists rot. Treated wood should also increase the life expectancy of the wood.
     
  8. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC

    No way.
    A boat transom isnt a light fixture hanging on the porch that needs a weep hole.
    Coat the whole thing top, bottom sides, and back with epoxy until the wood wont take any more epoxy. Usually this is about 3 coats. Get all of the edges real good.
    Makes absolutely no sense to epoxy part of a transom because what you are attempting to prevent is delamination and WET rot.
    Water vapor can cause wet rot. It doesnt have to be submerged or physically being exposed to splashing water.
    If you coat the thing with epoxy like is supposed to be done where is the trapped water coming from?
    Epoxy is 99 point something or other waterproof. It dont get no better in the boating world.
    That is alot more waterproof then a fiberglass boat hull.

    Have you ever remodeled a house and found rotted studs in walls? Particularly outside walls and bathrooms? No vapor barrier. Its rot caused by water vapor not a physical leak.

    What does water vapor do when it gets into the unepoxied bottom of a transom? It collects and collects into the form we most visualize, actual water. You left the door open for it and its going to go to work from the inside out.