River Stories

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by bnt55, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. bnt55

    bnt55 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Northern KY
    I was talking to a friend of mine the other day about boating on the Ohio River and the dangers that come with a big river, and I got to thinking since there is alot of guys that fish big waters here that there's got to be a few good stories around, here's mine:

    There has been a few times while on the river that I have been a little un-nerved but this time takes the cake. It was early January in Kentucky, which translates to duck season for me and I had decided to do a little blind hunting out of my boat in a feeder creek along the bank of the Ohio River one early morning, for some strange reason that week we had a warm front roll through and the mix between warm air and cold water had caused a serious fog bank to settle over the river. I knew it was thick when I launched my boat but I really didn't realize just how thick until I made my way out of the launch creek and motored out into the main channel. Not having experienced a real heavy fog before I was under the assumption that staying right next to the bank and following it to my hunting spot would be a piece of cake...I was wrong, bad wrong. I imagine that it only took about 100 yards of putting along at idle speed for me to unknowingly begin a slow turn towards the main barge channel and away from the shoreline. This fog which had started out as heavy had now become a white out, I literally could not see 2 ft past any side of my boat, the navigation lights on the front of my 20' boat were faint glows and I was getting scared. Now remember this is the first time I have experienced a white out to this proportion and I was unsure of what to do, being in a thick blanket totally robs you of all bearings, I couldnt tell if I was pointing left or right or up or down for that matter and the spotlight was making things worse, but without it there was just an eerie red and green light. I distinctly remember thinking about the newspaper headlines "KY Hunter Ran Down by Ohio River Barge While Floating in the Middle of the River at 4:00 AM". The only saving grace for me that morning was that while I was launching there was another group of hunters pulling up to the boat ramp and they happened to follow me out into the river in their boat, the way I know this is that I saw their bow light coming TOWARDS my bow which means I was going the complete opposite way I was supposed to be going. We pulled along side each other and I found out they were as lost as I was, they had seen my boat light head up river and they followed thinking I knew what I was doing. After what seemed an eternity of motoring..stopping...shutting off lights and trying to see a faint outline of a shoreline we finally found the land. I was never so glad to see the shoreline in my life, I even think my dog was happy. All in all it took 1 hour to go 1/4 mile up river and 45 minutes of that time I spent circling in the barge lane on the Ohio River thinking I was going the right direction the whole time! That was a very dangerous lesson learned and it will never be forgotten.

    Let's hear another....

    Bill
     
  2. firechief4201

    firechief4201 New Member

    Messages:
    1,055
    State:
    Catlettsburg, Kentucky
    Thanks for the story. It gets pretty foggy around my area. And I would hate to be out in the middle of the river in a white out.
     

  3. waynesburgjay

    waynesburgjay New Member

    Messages:
    1,960
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    I was up in northeren PA one winter and decided to do some ice fishing on a small mountain lake. We just had a day of warm weather and rain, but the temps fell back down to around 30 with a 30 mile wind blowing.
    We started out in the middle of the lake and drilled 10 or 12 holes the ice was 5-6 inches thick. (plenty). We had no luck so we walked to the other side where we drilled more holes. The ice was almost 16 inches thick. We started to catch some perch so we set up ice tents and fished all night. Well, during the night the lake level was trying to raise and you could feel big sections of ice shift and cracking. The next morning when it got light out we could see our old holes out in the middle of the lake that were now a lot bigger from the higher water running underneath them. Some were 10 - 12 ft. wide. Then a fish warden worked his way out around the holes and when we told him we had been out all night he couldn't believe it.
    We packed up and worked our way back across the lake.
    If we would have fell through out in the midddle we would have probably been swept under the ice and gone.
    It was the first time I ever saw bugs (small stoneflies)hatching out of an icehole
     
  4. baitchunker

    baitchunker New Member

    Messages:
    1,689
    State:
    alabama
    i have had some "iffy" experiences with thick fog and some some tense moments with high water (took about 10 gallons over my bow 1 time).

    but, by far the most intense moment for me on the water (other than at sea with the service during big storms) was last fall.

    Amy was closing the store that night and i decided to go gig some flounder on the mud flats untill about midnight. as luck would have it, i didnt call her or anybody else for that matter to let them know i was going. i was poling along a small cut through one of the flats when my boat got stuck. the tide was falling so i knew it would only get stuck worse as the night went on. no big deal i thought. i'll just get out and push (18' boat in 3-5 "'s of water aint so easy). b4 i hopped in the water i shined my spot light around like i allways do just to keep an eye on the gators. for whatever reason there seemed to be more than usual that night. even more creepy, they seemed to be a lot closer than usual. i have hopped in the water with them b4 to push my boat, but something about that night really got to me. every few feet, i would stop and shine the light, it was like they were following me. i know it was prolly all in my head, but it really started freaking me out. after about an hour i finally got back into floatable water. boy was i glad. moral of the story...

    well there might be a moral, but i havent learned it yet, i still gig flounder alone out there.
     
  5. jagdoctor1

    jagdoctor1 New Member

    Messages:
    708
    State:
    CA/AZ
    Just a bitto info. Most outdoorsman carry a compass of some kind.... It would help you find shore in the fog.
     
  6. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Long story short, a trotline hook somehow went through my thumbnail. I was alone, couldn't get hold of the mainline, there was a lot of current, and as I was hanging on, trying to figure out my next move, it ripped out through the end of my thumb. I just stayed on my hands and knees on the deck, and bled and puked for a couple of minutes.
     
  7. bnt55

    bnt55 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Northern KY
    Holy crap Katman! that's disgusting, I think I would rather be lost in the fog:crazy:.

    Actually Jagdoctor most sporstman carry a GPS nowadays and even if I would have 2 of each I doubt I would have remembered them since i thought I was going the right direction. But yes a compass or a GPS is very important when outdoors and I always try and forget mine in my glove compartment of my truck..:smile2: