Rib Recipes

Discussion in 'The BOC Diner' started by Boomer, Jun 23, 2008.

  1. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I love pork ribs, dont care the style of ribs.

    I dont have my recipe in front of me, so I cannot give you the exact quanities I use, but after about 30 years of playing with this recipe, I think it makes pretty good ribs. You will have to play with the amounts you use and the quanity.

    Rub

    Paparika (use good quality paparika)
    Salt
    Course ground pepper (I take a baggie and hammer and smash em)
    dried onions
    cayanne pepper
    pepper flakes
    garlic powder
    dill (use sparingly, a little goes a long way)

    Wet Mop

    6 teaspoons of dry rub
    1 cup apple cider vinagar (may need more depending on how much jelly you use I like my mop kind of thick, this helps when you trying to keep it on the ribs)
    dried onions
    cayanne flakes (optional)
    1 can tomato paste
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1 jar apple jelly
    salt
    pepper

    I first parboil my ribs especially if they arent baby backs. 15-20 minutes, until the meat start to seperate from the bone. This gets rid of a lot of the fat.

    I smoke my ribs from 15-18 hours over a a low heat 200-225, I have a brinkman smoker, and use a good briquet, and I have a supply of hardwoods I add to the briquets every 2 hours. I like using apple wood, if I can find it. Wally World sells the chips, but over the last couple of years, I have found a couple of trees people wanted removed. I also like to use hickory, or pecan, if you do use pecan, mix it with something like hickory. Pecan gives off a rather potent smoke. So a little goes a long way. If I am using pecan I only add it about every 3 hours. Keep the heat constant is the main thing in smoking ribs. My son uses the above recipe on the BBQ grill with pretty good results.
    But I like to be able to pick up a rib by the bone and have the meat fall off. BBQ grills have a tendency to under cook ribs or any way I think so.

    The rub. I wash off the ribs in cold water real good, because of the bone dust, then I take paper towels and dry them. With the rub I put it on thick. Dont be afraid to do this, because as the heat melts the fat you use a lot of rub.

    The wash, I use a 3 inch paint brush to paint the ribs with my wet mop. If you are going to use a paint brush, and not one of those fancy kitchen jobs, make sure you get a good quality paint brush. I learned the hard way after getting paint brush bristles in my ribs and on my chicken. The wet mop above I do not apply until about 3 hours before I am ready to bring the ribs out of the smoker. The reason for this is the sugar and the apple jelly will camalize on the ribs. At 200-225, it takes about 3 hours for this to happen, any earlier and you will have black ribs. (Learned the hard way, the ribs were still good, just didnt look good). 3 hours is plenty of time, for the wet mop, put in on heavy, and I like to wet em down often, then the last 30-45 mintes dont apply anything and bring up the heat in your smoker to dry the wet mop off.

    Give this a try, and let me know how it goes. I have tried all kinds of spices over the year in the rub and in the wet mop, I have found that sometimes simper the recipe is the better. Experiment with it, stay away from these spices.......curry powder and Wasabi powder......lol had to throw those ribs away. The dog would not touch the one with Wasabi powder.......if you are going to experiment, I would suggest do like I do, cut off a couple of pieces of ribs from the end and save some of the dry rub and wet mop and play around with it, instead of messing up a whole meal.........lessons learned......
     
  2. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    thanks for the info Boomer. I will have to try this sometime. Can't beat good BBQ!! :wink::big_smile:
     

  3. gardengrz

    gardengrz New Member

    Messages:
    899
    State:
    wakeman,ohio
    :cool2: since you say you like ribs any way or kind try this: put some country style ribs with your favorite seasonings in a slow cooker with a glass lid with a little water in th bottum. let cook all day. bout supper time drain all the liquid and stir around with fork and add bbq sauce. try it ull like it :big_smile: youll need a pack of buns and a jar of pickels :smile2:
     
  4. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I have never cooked them that way, will have to give it a try, when I load up my smoker, I usually smoke chicken, bolgna, sausage ribs, and about anything else I can stack in there. Then I will reheat them in the oven.

    I am not a big fan of BBQ sauce. That is why I add the wet mop to my ribs. However the rest of my family likes the ribs with BBQ sauce. I like the flavor of the smoke, and the seasonings.
     
  5. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    You forgot one thing to go with the buns and pickles.........red onions, cant do with them on BBQ. Man I have been out here to long, I use to have nightmares about food, once I dreamed I was in Rib Crib and they ran out of ribs. Funny thing about being overseas is food. I eat at a military chow hall, and they kind of make everything bland, hardly any seasoning on anything. I have learned that you can make about anything edible (except for the Spanish food, I have been eating for the last 2 weeks) with a little hot sauces and pepper.

    I am up North on a Spanish FOB, and the guys here did up some chicken and steaks on the grill and had the locals get some fresh veggies. Simple seasoning, but I tell you it makes you miss home.
     
  6. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    You forgot one thing to go with the buns and pickles.........red onions, cant do with them on BBQ. Man I have been out here to long, I use to have nightmares about food, once I dreamed I was in Rib Crib and they ran out of ribs. Funny thing about being overseas is food. I eat at a military chow hall, and they kind of make everything bland, hardly any seasoning on anything. I have learned that you can make about anything edible (except for the Spanish food, I have been eating for the last 2 weeks) with a little hot sauces and pepper.

    I am up North on a Spanish FOB, and the guys here did up some chicken and steaks on the grill and had the locals get some fresh veggies. Simple seasoning, but I tell you it makes you miss home.
     
  7. ratkinson

    ratkinson New Member

    Messages:
    627
    State:
    NY
    Boomer,
    Hope you don't mind I printed out yout recipe to put in my book. What are the odds if we got all the stuff together for your ribs that we could get it to you in good shape? I'm sure folks would be willing to help, but, I don't know how the flow of packages goes over there. Wouldn't want it sitting somewhere so long that the meat goes bad. I'd also like to make sure we got enough for your buds over there. Just a thought. Let me know what you think. Any wild pigs over there? Maybe we could jjust send the fixxins......LOL
    I would love to try to make it happen.


    Richard
     
  8. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    You just dont know what I would do for some good ribs! I appreciate the offer, unfortunately the mail system is screwed up here and sometimes it takes a couple of months to get any kind of mail, so I will have to decline on the offer, sure is tempting though! It would be torture if those ribs got here and I couldnt eat them.....lol...

    I hope you like the recipe, been working on it for a long time, and feel free to pass it on.......

    No hogs here, so cant buy it on the economy (Muslims do not eat pork), we can get lamb, sheep, goats and chickens, and beef and that is it.