Resistance is futile...

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by spanishcatman, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. spanishcatman

    spanishcatman New Member

    Messages:
    133
    State:
    United Kingdom
    I've got a question. What's your opinion on tackle resistance on a biting cat? I mean heavy leads, stiff clickers, line drag etc. Do you think it can put fish off if they're not in an aggressive mood? I'd appreciate your thoughts and experience on this.
     
  2. Pylodictis Olivaris

    Pylodictis Olivaris New Member

    Messages:
    257
    State:
    Iowa
    Good question...I have a couple of different bait clickers and they both have really different tensions on them. Even after adjusting them every way possible, one seems to be set so light that if you sneeze it goes off and one seems to be so tight and resistant that it seems it wouldn't be very good for a lite biter.....however I have had a lot of success with both....I always have the tendency to want to take the bait clicker off on the tight one and let it free spool just for precaution but it still seems to put of a click..click..zzzzzzzzzz when I least expect it.
    I look at it like this...to us there seems to be a lot of tension because that is what we are focused on and when we test it we are only pulling line from the spool only inches away from the actual reel. Think of it as if you were trying to loosen a rusty bolt with a small wrench. When you are up close to it and don't have a lot of leverage there is a ton of tension but if you put a 5 foot pipe on the end of the wrench and turn it, No Problem. With a baitclicker it is kind of the same, pulling the line right by the reel you can definetly feel the tension, but if you lay your pole on the ground and let out about 20 feet of line and then pull on the end of the line it comes of and clicks very easy with hardly any tension. In my own experiences with this I wouldn't worry about it because at the end of the line it isn't as tough to click the reel as you think. Also if you keep the pole angled in a positon to where the line can pull almost straight out without bending the poll this helps tremendously as well.
     

  3. countrycat15

    countrycat15 New Member

    Messages:
    668
    State:
    gastiona,nc
  4. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    Todd that is an excellent post. You explained it well. Thanks
     
  5. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    Mike,

    Fishing on the home river (Great Miami River) means heavy current sometimes, and usually moderate current. I'm shorebound now, so it's most always oriented crosscurrent, just below a lowhead dam or on a bend, which means a pretty heavy clicker setting. I use the clicker on the 6500C3s tight enough to just keep the line still on the cross current, using no-roll sliprigged up to 8-oz. Fish don't seem to mind. Rods are anchored to the dam wall in aluminum brackets, or in sand spikes stuck in the rocks. I will say that the angle of the rod with respect to the pull on the line adds a lot of resistance due to guide friction felt by the fish, so I try to point the rod in the direction of the bait and keep the angle low to the water.

    One thing you can't count on is the fish always taking the bait "away" as I have many pulling the bait towards me or at some extreme angle to the sinker. These are the tough ones to hook, so I have taken to using the thumb on the spool to feel the fish load up, push the rod out along the line and turn the handle and set the hook. If you want to experiment, set up a side-by-side with a sliprig and a 3-way: same sinker weight, same bait, same line, same leader length - Not much difference in results where I'm from, except I only have to tie 3 knots instead of 5 when I break off (frequently).

    In little current, or on a lake, I use the lightest no-roll possible to keep the live bait in place (the flat no-roll won't roll around when the bait pulls, so I can use a generally lighter weight), and set the clickers to as light as possible to keep the bait from running away.

    In both cases, bait is usually a chub up to 12 inches, bluegill/warmouth to about 7 inches, small carp or sheephead, or shad up to about 10 inches. I've had flatheads especially work a bait for up to 45 minutes without pulling more than three clicks out, but all the while you can watch the rod tip bounce like crazy. Other times it's like a drag race, no warning.

    I've toyed with locking the reel up with live bait, and had good results. Somehow, I just like to hear that clicker scream, and it's much easier at night 'cause the bifocals a real pain whe you don't use a lantern. If a big flattie or channel really wants that bait, clicker or locked doesn't seem to matter.

    Dennis
     
  6. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    I really don't think clicker tension bothers them. I do try to pick up the rod as soon as I can once the clicking starts. I ease it up slowly and start pointing the tip towards the fish on a tight line (to feel the fish and stop the clicking) and place my thumb on the 7000's free spool button and ever so gently turn the handel and let my thumb ride the button up so there is no loud sudden jerk engaging the reel. I think that vibration from engaging can cause them to drop a bait. Then I switch off the clicker and let them load up on the rod then set hard.
     
  7. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Use a circle hook and it is not a point of concern.
     
  8. spanishcatman

    spanishcatman New Member

    Messages:
    133
    State:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for all your comments guys - especially Todd and Dennis for some real detail. Wylie cat mentioned circle hooks. I was given some this spring to try: 'Don't strike - let the fish run and take up the pressure' was the advice I was given. I didn't use them and they're still in my box. The reason was I didn't trust them. Do they work?
     
  9. Pylodictis Olivaris

    Pylodictis Olivaris New Member

    Messages:
    257
    State:
    Iowa
    Ol whiskers brought up a good point when he mentioned that you can't always count on the fish taking your bait "away" This is very true and happens alot. Unfortunatley your bait clicker wont do you a bit of good when the fish is moving towards you. Great Posts guys.