Replacing bolts on your Deer stand.

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by derbycitycatman, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Ive been wanting to replace the rusted up bolts on my stands with stainless steel just so I dont have to worry about them rusting away. The price of these is quite a bit more than I want to spend right now, who knows might get cheaper here soon. Ive got a few questions that might help me make up my mind. Will look online for cheaper bolts as well. Is zinc plated much better than regular steel, last longer?

    Have any of you had bolts rust away and cause safety issues? How long can a regular bolt last out in the weather, I may just replace them every 4-5 years with regular steel. Have any of you done this yourself with stainless or regular bolts? Am I missing or forgetting anything?
     
  2. porboy

    porboy New Member

    Messages:
    629
    State:
    TX Panhand
    Brian, I don't know about stainless but I do replace bolts with the extra hard bolts called 8 or 9's here in this area. They are extra strength and work well for me. Your tractor dealers will have them.
     

  3. misterwhisker

    misterwhisker New Member

    Messages:
    1,056
    State:
    T. Bowl
    try dipping your nuts and bolts in that rubber stuff..you know the stuff they make for tool handles and after you replace them you can coat them again ..that will keep them from rusting :wink:
     
  4. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Stainless bolts aren't strong as steel. The shear strength aint all that great.
    I wasnt aware of it until a welder at work who also is darn good at metalurgy demonstrated with two wreches on a good sized bolt. Alot bigger then anything on a treestand.
    Snapped the head right off with one quick motion by hooking a box end over the head and a box end over the shaft.

    Makes sense, I had wondered why alot of engine fixtures and hardware for those fixtures weren't stainless. It's not like they couldn't afford them.
    I know why now. Every bolt we use is hardened steel.

    Being the liability these treestand companies carry I imagine it's got hardened bolts in it. The climber I gave my nephew does.
     
  5. katfish ken

    katfish ken New Member

    Messages:
    4,092
    State:
    Paintsvill
    I'm with these other guys on this one. Grade 8 bolts are a better choice you can get them at TSC or Lowe's probably any hardware store that sells bolts in bulk.
     
  6. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Only one product that I have used I would recomend for rust or to prevent rust.
    POR15. Works better on rust then clean steel as the rust gives it something to grab. It's used in restoring cars alot. The chassis are sprayed with it.

    I dont guess there is any good way to get it off metal other then sandblasting. A grinder does nothing but melts it and moves it around.
    It is the stuff.

    I pay around 30 bucks a quart for it. Kinda of expensive for painting a few bolts with an art brush but good for future reference.

    Word of warning. You get it on you, you'll wear it. If you use a brush or spray gun be prepared to toss them when done. People I know that use it on cars buy a cheap gun, do all their spraying at one time and toss the gun.
     
  7. katfish ken

    katfish ken New Member

    Messages:
    4,092
    State:
    Paintsvill
    Mark that sounds like it might be good to use on the complete stand. Is it hard like metal or would it be good at deadening sound if put on parts that might be bumped by a gun or other hard objects????
     
  8. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Looks and feels like paint.
    If whatever you put it on catches alot of UV rays you need to prime and paint it.
    It's some mean stuff though. I painted a pontoon trailer with it about 18 months ago. Not a speck of rust showing on it nowhere and is was nothing but rust. It is a steel trailer that was used in saltwater. I went over it with flap disks on the grinder and knocked of the high rust before painting with POR15. Primed it and then painted it. Looks like a new trailer.
    Wear gloves and old clothes. You'll rub the skin off trying to wash it off.
     
  9. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
  10. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    I Agree. I worked in a seafood processing factory and there was not a single bolt on anything that was not stainless. This included work platforms, ladders to get to upper levels on the working lines, electric motor mounts on motors up to and over 125hp, stainless pump and grinder impellers that ran at 5000rpm, roll around transfer tubs that when full ranged from 2000-5000lbs, and the palletizer that stacked a pallet full of product and wrapped it.
    Also we used #2 1/4 inch bolts (1 on each side) to mount the bumpers on our racecars and 99% of the time in a collision the bolt would bend but not fail. Nascar only uses 1/4 and 3/8th non grade bolts to mount the front bumpers, 2-1/4 and 1-3/8 inch bolts per side and 2-1/4 inch bolts, 1 per side on the rear bumpers.
     
  11. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    I agree that stainless usually isn't as strong, but i would feel that it is plenty strong for a deer stand. Pool ladders, dock ladders, and lots of other stuff use stainless bolts. One thing you may want to think about: if you plan on taking your stand apart someday, stainless bolts "gall" a lot of times. This means your expensive stainless bolts will probably have to be snapped off to get your stand apart, should the need ever arise. Maybe you could look into galvanized.
     
  12. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    Another thing to think about, a lot of stands use those "quick clips" on the ladders. I'm pretty sure these aren't hardened steel. If grade 8 bolts make you feel more comfortable in your stand, then by all means use them. The shear strength on most bolts is way more than you will put on them with just a tree stand anyway IMHO.

    Everything I've seen says the tensile strength of a grade 5 bolt is 120,000psi. They figure shear strength as 60% of tensile strength, so a grade 5 bolt has about 70,000psi shear strength. I imagine your stand would fail before the bolt would.

    see here: http://www.portlandbolt.com/faqs/bolt-shear-strength-considerations
     
  13. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    I've ued grade 8 bolts on my stands. I usually counter sink the holes. That way when I'm finished tightening the bolts I go back and fill the holes with silicone. So far it has worked great on my tree house blinds. I use stainless on my tri pod stands.