Removing Paint from Aluminum Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Repair Help' started by TXBlueHunter, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. TXBlueHunter

    TXBlueHunter New Member

    Messages:
    231
    State:
    Flower Mound, Texas
    Is there any easy way to remove pait from an aluminum boat? I have a 14foot semi-v bottom that I am redoing and need to repait it but sanding it will take forever. Just looking for an easier faster way. Sand blasting is not an option do not what to spend that kind of money.

    Thanks
     
  2. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    Go to your local paint mfg's retail store and buy some marine stripper. It will come in a metal 1 gallon container. It is in a gel like form. you can use an old paint brush to apply. And use a scrapper to remove and rinse away any remaining. Wear chemical safe gloves and goggles and avoid splashes and contact with skin. Just brush it on, wait 5-10 minutes. The paint will litteraly remove itself. Dispose of used brush when you are finished. You can reuse product as well. Just make a funnel with paper and put back into container. As long as it it in gel form it is good to use.

    David Frantz
     

  3. malaki

    malaki New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Redmon Illinois
    make sure you have good ventalation when you use that stuff. the fumes will burn your throat if you get a good wif of it. good luck!
     
  4. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    You mean like this?

    We went a little overboard removing paint from the outside of the hull. We used paint stripper (non-toxic - which is why my brother-in-law is not wearing a respirator) and pads like the one pictured to remove the bulk of the paint. We also used a sanding disk on an angle grinder - one that looks more like a grinding wheel. Sorry I don't have a pic of it.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. gottafish

    gottafish New Member

    Messages:
    308
    State:
    Chesapeake, VA
    Here we sprayed primer on the exterior of the hull, followed by the final coat(s) of paint and the camo pattern. You can see on the inside, we got a little smarter and just knocked off the loose paint, roughed it up and primed the bare spots, which is what the paint manufacturer recommended doing in the first place.

    /scott
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    I would recomend doing it outside. Vetalation is not an issue then.
     
  7. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    Here is a product that would work well.

    http://www.sherlink.com/sher-link/catalog/BuildTree2Action.do;JSESSIONID_WLCS_COMMERCE=Dppw6yz6Rq0GnL31n4yFd2pjNVWPyh7XCc1TkSTvCsFshv5R01Zr!-1244787501!NONE?wlcs_catalog_item_sku=1527712&onlyDetails=true
     
  8. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Tennessee
    If the existing paint is holding up well, then just etch ("wipe" it) it with some 0000 steel wool and paint directly over it. You'll still need to etch the bare aluminum with a 1:1 mixture of vinegar and water. This consists of spraying the solution on the metal and LEAVING IT ALONE!!! Don't touch the solution at all. Let it dry naturally. Then prime with zinc chromate. And you're ready to paint!
     
  9. AZrivercat

    AZrivercat New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    Arizona
    I am in process of removing paint from my 12' aluminum boat w/ 3 coats of paint on it, and have tried multiple methods.

    Aircraft paint remover- works excellent but will be very expensive, especially
    if you have multiple coats of paint. I went through 3 gal @ $20
    apeice and didnt get more than 3/4 of the inside done.

    Sanding- I used a grinder w/ sanding wheel attachment and various grits,
    this works but in my situation I had to use an aggressive grit to
    make any progress and it was sanding too deep. An automotive
    sander would probably work a bit better.

    Wire wheel- Like the others I have decided its best to just remove any
    loose paint, rough it up and paint over it. A wire wheel
    attachment on a grinder works well for this.

    Probably the best thing you can do is get a couple extra hands, and just go to town on it, and be prepared to work, what I thought would take a weekend has turned into a 40hr+ job. I cant wait to get some fresh paint on it though.
     
  10. cj7848

    cj7848 New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    texas
    Be careful with sanding around the rivets with any type of grinder, you don't want to take away any of the rivet material.
     
  11. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Zinc Chromate is good stuff. So good I dont believe the public should be able to buy it because the public aint going to dispose of it properly. If that stuff wont sterilize you it will make you have 3 headed babies with an airhorn attachment.
    Any part of it needs to be kept out of a sewer , landfill, etc.

    The replacement that alot in the aircraft industry are going to is
    Zinc Molybdate. It works just as well and is alot more enviromentally and people safe.

    I personally would just use a name brand etching primer.
    If you buy it in the spray can it runs around 15 bucks a can. Spray on a light covering coat and hot coat it about 3-5 minutes later again with the primer.
    It will work just as well.

    Stripping. I got alot of experience in this stripping the bottom paint off two
    24' pontoons. None of the above mentioned paint removers worked very well in fact, I would have been better off if I didnt use them.
    Bottom paint is tuff stuff. The remover melts parts of the paint then I played heck at getting the mess off the pontoon. All I was doing doing was moving the mess from one place to another and not getting anywhere close to getting anything prepped.

    Sandblasting is the ticket if you can afford it and you have someone that knows how to sandblast. If not, you can wind up with a warped mess.

    The angle grinder is the best option. Use a 60-120 grit flap disk and dont hang around in one place too long. Having used an angle grinder before helps before you attack an aluminum job with it.
    The other good attachment for the angle grinder is the knotted wire stripping head you can find in places like Lowes or Home Depot.
    Leave the wire brush junk that attaches to a drill in the store. Complete waste of money for this job.

    If you dont have an angle grinder and you tinker around with stuff like this, take a timeout on the boat and spend a 100 bucks on a good 4-1/2" angle grinder. No man or shop should be without one. I use mine alot. I cut masonry, grind welds, cut steel, and sand steel and aluminum with mine.
    You can buy wheels for about any material you want to mess with and wheels are cheap.
    I have alot of tools from a Klein screwdriver to a Shopsmith MarkV.
    I have two angle grinders. One is 110v and the other runs on an 18v battery.
    The grinder is one of the best tools I've ever bought.

    My grinder paid for itself redoing the pontoon boat trailer. I replaced the springs, shackles, U-bolts, and carriers. on top of that I made some modifications.
    The bolts were long rusted. the grinder turned a long job with alot of cussing into a short one.
    I just cut the U-bolts, and springs as needed to get the junk out with a grinder.
    Fabricating some angle and rubber coated wire mat to fit over the tongue of the trailer was done entirely with an angle grinder and a drill.