Reloading

Discussion in 'Guns - Blackpowder' started by Whistler, Oct 10, 2009.

  1. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Well, last year my reloading went great. I'm probably never gonna be one of those guys that load tons and tons of rounds, but I got into this for accuracy and boy did I ever get what I asked for. Shot groups are now the size of a dime at 100 yards and never changes. But now I have a questions for everyone. One of my friends has a .270 pump. It's very nice and has never been fired. I know the loads and all are the same as any other .270 in the book. But is there anything special I should do to these loads? Anything different that what I am already doing with the bolt actions? The Sierra book says a few things, but I thought I'd ask here before I take this one on. Thanks all.

    Oh and I'm fixin to take out one of our great staff member's when I figure out who gave me that avatar!!!!!!!!! LOL
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2009
  2. NJ CLAD

    NJ CLAD New Member

    Messages:
    196
    State:
    Arizona
    Just remember to start out 5% below max loads. Make sure you have your resizing die adjusted properly for the rifle. The gauges made by Hornady, that allow you to measure head to shoulder length, are invaluable. Even with bolt action rifles, they should be used to adjust the sizing die. Just my $.02!!!
     

  3. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Don't load a pump or semi auto as hot as a bolt action in the rifle loads. You can load some real good loads for a pump 270 though. Every one of the shoot different brian. Work you up about 3 different loads and at about 5 to 7 rounds each and try them and see which ones work the best for that rifle. I love the 270, One of the flattest shooters around.
     
  4. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    I use an empty "load" until I get the head space right for the gun. I just size the shell and crimp it but I don't prime it or fill it.

    As for loads; most guns, mine anyway, shoot best with a moderate load. I get some great groups with lighter loads, and save a lot of wear and tear on my casings. I have some 30-06s that I've loaded many times with no signs of stress.
     
  5. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    Shooting a pump you might want to put a slight crimp on the round. Sometimes the bullet will move in the neck of the case in a pump or semi auto. I use target dies for my .270 and you can't shoot them in a pump with out the bullet moving.
     
  6. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Dont know whether it would need it or not,I crimp my 30-30 Win for obvious reasond,I have a Lee collet crimp die for my 243 but never have used it. I dont crimp my sons 7mm/08 either,But thats becaise the bullets we use have no cannelure.
     
  7. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    OK, this is what I have right now. All my shells are ready to load. All were full length sized. OAL has been measured with the Hornady Lock and Load gauges. I have not set my loading die yet for length and the shells are not primed yet, because I thought I'd ask if there were differences in loading for a bolt action and a pump. I'm going to start out with minimum load for the Pump. But what I really want to know about is what this says::

    From my Sierra Reloading Data:

    Despite the oft-repeated advice that autoloaders, pumpguns and lever-actions require small base dies, the Service Rifles may be the exception that proves the rule. While it’s true that all of these action types lack the powerful camming forces of a bolt-action, the more generous chamber dimensions common to most Service Rifles are normally compatible with standard dies. Please understand that this is a general statement, and that there are exceptions to this. The point is, you don’t need to automatically go to a small base die set. Most of the standard reloading dies produced by reputable firms, such as RCBS, will resize fired brass properly to work in these rifles.

    Should I run out and get a small base die? Full length every time? Just a few inexperienced reloader's questions. And this is not a service rifle, it's a Remington 7600 Pump Action .270 as shown here:

    http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/centerfire_rifles/model_7600.asp

    Thanks for what you've all said so far.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2009
  8. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Brian if your die was a full length die then you are good to go. Some people use a die to only resize the neck when shooting in the same weapon all the time. If you have the rifle on hand take one of your finished cases and see if it will fit in the chamber good and snug without any problem.
     
  9. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    I agree, put a bullet in one to the correct length without powder or primer. Color the bullet with a Sharpie and make sure it is not hitting the rifling in the barrel. If you can see marks from the rifling then shorten your AOL and try again, you can just keep reusing the original bullet just wipe it off with a little cleaner and color it again. (this is a good practice for all loads just as a precautionary measure) As long as it fits you are good to go. I have seen and loaded for some touchy guns, the auto loading rifles are the ones that stand out, but the few pumps I have done were all standard practice.
     
  10. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    in the reloading that i have done, and i am no expert, i have found that the same round in the the same type and model gun can shoot different. for example if i have two .300 win mag's in a ruger mark II, one may shoot tight groups with load "A" where as the second gun will shoot load "B" better. so when going from a pump to a bolt action or vise versa, i would take the advice already given and load up a couple different setups to get an idea of which one works best. when doing this make sure you give the gun ample time to cool off in between shots, otherwise your findings could be in accurate.
     
  11. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia

    That's a good idea, the sharpie. I've always smoked the bullets over a candle or a Zippo lighter to check length and head space.
     
  12. NJ CLAD

    NJ CLAD New Member

    Messages:
    196
    State:
    Arizona
    If your firearm will load easily with standard dies, use them. The only reason to switch to small base dies, is if you have trouble closing the chamber on your cases once you have sized them. If you opt for small base dies when you don't need them, it will just decrease the number of loadings you will get with the cases.
     
  13. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    Good points. When I load to find a load with a specific bullet I load 5 rounds at the starting point or just under for the powder then add a little and load 5 more and add a little and load 5 more etc.... Then I shoot 5 shot groups and see which powder and how much it likes. I have a 30-06 that likes light loads with Nosler 165gr and 58gr of RL 19 (2700fps) BUT with a heavier 220gr partition it likes 59 grains of IMR4350. (2800fps)
    Again you can use different Sharpies to color the case heads of each load and keep the color listed in your notes so you can tell which load it liked better.
    I also use the Sharpie trick for loads that look the same. For my 25-06 anything that is colored blue is a varmint load (around 85 grains) anything black is a hunting load of 117 grains and red is hunting at 120 grains. Dump them all in a pile and I can tell you what each one is without a doubt.
     
  14. TJD

    TJD New Member

    Messages:
    258
    State:
    Missouri
    You got good advice about making a dummy round that fits your chamber. I also use it to re-set my seating die when I load for different guns.

    Semi-autos jirk the cases from the chamber while they are still hot, and they may be still expanding. There fore the sizing die may need to be turned down more than for a bolt gun. Test the re-sized cases (With out primer, powder, or bullet) to make sure they completly chamber. If it won't fit twist the sizing die down some more. If you have it all the way down on top of the shell holder but it still won't chamber then get the small base die. If you pick up brass that was fired in a different gun besure to use the above method.
    Re-loading is a sport in it's own right. Have fun be save.
     
  15. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Thought I'd post this because I know how bad I dislike it when someone asks for help, then never let's on to what has happened. LOL I found that I couldn't reload for this rifle with the tools I have now. I don't have the small base die's for this so I just decided not to do this. I loaded up several different dummy rounds and could not get them to chamber. Factory loads chamber just fine. So to be safe, I declined to attempt this until I can get those dies and see what they do. Thanks everyone for the help. Everything else I've done has worked out great!