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Jeffrey, a bait casting reel has a better drag system and does not twist the line up. Many prefer the bait caster but it takes a day or so to get used to it. When you learn to use them you learn how to prevent them from backlashing. You basically set the casting drag high so it can not over run the spool. Then as you get uses to it you back it off a little at a time after a while you get good distance with no backlashes. Casting into the wind is the hardest and you may need to tighten the casting drag a little in those situations.

Mono is usually the preferred leader material because it will take more abrasion abuse than braid will and the leader gets the most contact with the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Jeffrey, a bait casting reel has a better drag system and does not twist the line up. Many prefer the bait caster but it takes a day or so to get used to it. When you learn to use them you learn how to prevent them from backlashing. You basically set the casting drag high so it can not over run the spool. Then as you get uses to it you back it off a little at a time after a while you get good distance with no backlashes. Casting into the wind is the hardest and you may need to tighten the casting drag a little in those situations.

Mono is usually the preferred leader material because it will take more abrasion abuse than braid will and the leader gets the most contact with the bottom.
Thank you! What is braided line used for?
 

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If you're learning to use a baitcaster. My suggestion is to buy some cheaper mono to spool up with while you're practicing in your yard. A braid backlash can get bad enough for a rookie that the reel will end up for sale. That said baitcaster do typically have a more efficient drag and offer more line control once you're thumb learns when to add more pressure to the spool and when not to. They're pretty easy to use once you get past the initial few birdnests :wink1:
 

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Jeffrey, Denzil and Chuck are right on here. I use both reels with braid and reels with mono depending on where I am fishing. For me, I prefer to use braid when I can. I think it cast better, it does not stretch so you get much better feel for bites and because it can be a smaller diameter than mono it is effected less by current. Not being effected as much can help you hold bottom in current.

Keep in mind I always use a mono leader. For me the length can very a little but it is generally 1 to 3 feet long. A 1 foot feeder gives you a little more control on where your bait is and a 3 foot leader can give your bait a little more free movement maybe making it appear more natural. But the main reason for the mono is to protect against abrasion from rocks and the sandpaper like pads in the lip of a catfish. The makeup of the bottom where you are fishing plays a major role in the line you need.

As far as setting the hook, I use circle hooks almost exclusively. So, I let the fish hook himself. On occasion they get timid and do nit hit hard but just hold the bait in their mouth. at this times I leave the Tod in the holder but reel down on the fish by cranking the handle as fast as I can. This should set the hook.

When bank fishing and in heavy current, the line can get bowed way out making it harder to get a good hooks. Braid will not bow as much because of its smaller diameter and also because it has no stretch, it should be easier to see the hook as well as detect a bite.

Nothing wrong with using either. They both catch fish. It shouldn't take long for you to decide which you prefer. Although there is a little expense for the line it should not be so much that you can't afford to try both.

I always use a leader that is slightly weaker than the main line because I use the inexpensive leader to help protect the main line. Having a full spool helps when casting and can help in landing a big fish. so I do not want to lose any of the main line. Thoughts do vary on this.

tight lines
 

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The term spinning reel and spin casting reel are often mis-used.

From reading your #1 post, I noticed you said you usually use a "spin casting" reel.

A spin casting reel has a closed face and a button on the back that releases the line. Like the Zebco 33.

A spinning reel has an open face and the line is usually in direct contact with your finger which releases the line during casting.

Because the line on a casting reel goes directly on the spool and the line on a spinning reel goes over a roller on the bail and then on the spool, the work fine with braid.

A spin casting reel is a little different. The line generally goes thru a small hole on the front cap and then is guided onto the spool by a single small pin. Since braid is constantly rubbing on the small pin while tension is on the line, it can easily cut into the pin causing damage. I do not recommend braid on a spin casting reel.

tight lines
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Jeffrey, Denzil and Chuck are right on here. I use both reels with braid and reels with mono depending on where I am fishing. For me, I prefer to use braid when I can. I think it cast better, it does not stretch so you get much better feel for bites and because it can be a smaller diameter than mono it is effected less by current. Not being effected as much can help you hold bottom in current.

Keep in mind I always use a mono leader. For me the length can very a little but it is generally 1 to 3 feet long. A 1 foot feeder gives you a little more control on where your bait is and a 3 foot leader can give your bait a little more free movement maybe making it appear more natural. But the main reason for the mono is to protect against abrasion from rocks and the sandpaper like pads in the lip of a catfish. The makeup of the bottom where you are fishing plays a major role in the line you need.

As far as setting the hook, I use circle hooks almost exclusively. So, I let the fish hook himself. On occasion they get timid and do nit hit hard but just hold the bait in their mouth. at this times I leave the Tod in the holder but reel down on the fish by cranking the handle as fast as I can. This should set the hook.

When bank fishing and in heavy current, the line can get bowed way out making it harder to get a good hooks. Braid will not bow as much because of its smaller diameter and also because it has no stretch, it should be easier to see the hook as well as detect a bite.

Nothing wrong with using either. They both catch fish. It shouldn't take long for you to decide which you prefer. Although there is a little expense for the line it should not be so much that you can't afford to try both.

I always use a leader that is slightly weaker than the main line because I use the inexpensive leader to help protect the main line. Having a full spool helps when casting and can help in landing a big fish. so I do not want to lose any of the main line. Thoughts do vary on this.

tight lines
This is why I joined this fishing group! Thanks for the advice. I'm going to go to braided as my main line and use mono leaders. That sounds like the best combo for where I fish. I'll get a baitcaster, but have a feeling I'll stick with the spinning reel as that's whatI'm used to. Great stuff from everyone. THANKS!
 

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This is why I joined this fishing group! Thanks for the advice. I'm going to go to braided as my main line and use mono leaders. That sounds like the best combo for where I fish. I'll get a baitcaster, but have a feeling I'll stick with the spinning reel as that's whatI'm used to. Great stuff from everyone. THANKS!
One thing I'll add to what twaskom has said already is to buy the very best baitcasting reel you can afford as I believe that the better reels create fewer backlashes and birdsnests. I remember years before I finally officially switched over to using baitcasters the vast majority of the time, I had found a cheapie low profile Shakespeare or something si ilar baitcaster that I tried to learn on and it was one of the most frustrating experiences of my life and made me give up on baitcasters for several years to come. Depending on the baitast style you want to try out will also help. I am a big fan of the Swedish made Abu Garcia Ambassadeurs, in particular the 6000/6500/6600 size reels, while the 7000 series is a favorite of a lot of catfisherman as well, I just dont need tat much line capacity on my reels for the rivers and lakes I fish.. If you decide to buy an Ambassadeur pay attention to the small details because for several years now they've been selling reels that are made in China and from what I've heard are essentially junk built with sub-par components. Another nice feature about the sizes I mentioned before(Again, only the Swedish made models) is the baitclicker, which makes me wonder how I ever flathead or. fished for powerful fish before. Some dont use the baitclicker at all, but I ALWAYS use mine The Shimano's are supposed to be really good reels as well, along with the CatMaxx from Bass Pro Shops, Daiwa Millionaires, Lew's Lazer Cast and Speed Cast are all good reels from the majority of the reviews I've read and heard. I just prefer but I just REALLY like the fact that the Abu's are made in Sweden, unlike the overwhelming majority of other reels availability being made in China, Taiwan, Thailand, etc. As far as low profile Bass-type baitcasters go, I'm not very familiar with but one in particular has caught my eye that I'm strongly wanti g to buy and give a shot with is the Okuma Citrix 350 model as it has a very strong rated drag system, plus a baitclicker which is really rare for the low profile baitcasters. I do know that there were a couple of older Abu low profiles that also had a higher than normal drag rating plus baitclickers as well. But I believe they are no longer being produced.
As far as spinning reels, there are many really good quality models available. One of my favorites is the old school Shimano Bait Runner models. I've heard the Okuma Avenger ABF reels with the Bait Feeders are really good reels especially given their economical prices. Jumping up quite a bit in price is the Penn reels with their Bait Feeder systems. A friend of mine that solely fishes salt water off the coast of New Zealand for Yellow Tail Tuna and different species of shark is 100% sold on using nothing but the various Penn Bait Feed reels and Ive seen some youtube videos of guys catching large tuna with them that make the drags scream and fight for 30+ minutes is a pretty good testimony to the brute strength of the Penn's. Bottom line is I highly recommend you moving up to either a baitcaster or spinning reel over the spincast reels. But it really just boils down to whatever YOU are comfortable with. Good luck with whatever you choose!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
One thing I'll add to what twaskom has said already is to buy the very best baitcasting reel you can afford as I believe that the better reels create fewer backlashes and birdsnests. I remember years before I finally officially switched over to using baitcasters the vast majority of the time, I had found a cheapie low profile Shakespeare or something si ilar baitcaster that I tried to learn on and it was one of the most frustrating experiences of my life and made me give up on baitcasters for several years to come. Depending on the baitast style you want to try out will also help. I am a big fan of the Swedish made Abu Garcia Ambassadeurs, in particular the 6000/6500/6600 size reels, while the 7000 series is a favorite of a lot of catfisherman as well, I just dont need tat much line capacity on my reels for the rivers and lakes I fish.. If you decide to buy an Ambassadeur pay attention to the small details because for several years now they've been selling reels that are made in China and from what I've heard are essentially junk built with sub-par components. Another nice feature about the sizes I mentioned before(Again, only the Swedish made models) is the baitclicker, which makes me wonder how I ever flathead or. fished for powerful fish before. Some dont use the baitclicker at all, but I ALWAYS use mine The Shimano's are supposed to be really good reels as well, along with the CatMaxx from Bass Pro Shops, Daiwa Millionaires, Lew's Lazer Cast and Speed Cast are all good reels from the majority of the reviews I've read and heard. I just prefer but I just REALLY like the fact that the Abu's are made in Sweden, unlike the overwhelming majority of other reels availability being made in China, Taiwan, Thailand, etc. As far as low profile Bass-type baitcasters go, I'm not very familiar with but one in particular has caught my eye that I'm strongly wanti g to buy and give a shot with is the Okuma Citrix 350 model as it has a very strong rated drag system, plus a baitclicker which is really rare for the low profile baitcasters. I do know that there were a couple of older Abu low profiles that also had a higher than normal drag rating plus baitclickers as well. But I believe they are no longer being produced.
As far as spinning reels, there are many really good quality models available. One of my favorites is the old school Shimano Bait Runner models. I've heard the Okuma Avenger ABF reels with the Bait Feeders are really good reels especially given their economical prices. Jumping up quite a bit in price is the Penn reels with their Bait Feeder systems. A friend of mine that solely fishes salt water off the coast of New Zealand for Yellow Tail Tuna and different species of shark is 100% sold on using nothing but the various Penn Bait Feed reels and Ive seen some youtube videos of guys catching large tuna with them that make the drags scream and fight for 30+ minutes is a pretty good testimony to the brute strength of the Penn's. Bottom line is I highly recommend you moving up to either a baitcaster or spinning reel over the spincast reels. But it really just boils down to whatever YOU are comfortable with. Good luck with whatever you choose!
I'm going to try the Okuma Avenger! Thanks for the tip. What can expect as far as difference between than and a normal spinning reel? What does the bait feeder feature do?
 

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The baitfeeder is a separate drag system that basically functions the same way a baitclicker on a baitcaster does. Once you engage it, a fish can pull line off without yanking your rod in and makes an sound so you know you're getting bit. Usually turning the reel handle will disengage the baitfeeder drag so the main drag can take over to fight the fish.
 

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Jeffrey, Chuck is spot on. Since one company (I think Daiwa) trademarked the name (bait runner) other companies use terms like bait feeders / live liner. Just be aware it goes by different names.

The use of these reel is much the same as a regular spinning reel. You cast them out and often set them in something to hold the rod tip up. At this point, if you are wanting to let the fish run you need to remember to flip the bait runner selector. At that point the reel will act like a bait caster set to free spool and the clicker on. One difference is the bait runner often has a knob to adjust the free spool tension allowing some control for current or wind.

If you are using a forked stick or something similar and you forget to flip the bait runner selector, a fish can yank your rod & reel into the lake. So don't forget.
 

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Jeffrey, Chuck is spot on. Since one company (I think Daiwa) trademarked the name (bait runner) other companies use terms like bait feeders / live liner. Just be aware it goes by different names.

The use of these reel is much the same as a regular spinning reel. You cast them out and often set them in something to hold the rod tip up. At this point, if you are wanting to let the fish run you need to remember to flip the bait runner selector. At that point the reel will act like a bait caster set to free spool and the clicker on. One difference is the bait runner often has a knob to adjust the free spool tension allowing some control for current or wind.

If you are using a forked stick or something similar and you forget to flip the bait runner selector, a fish can yank your rod & reel into the lake. So don't forget.
I've actually almost lost several poles that way. I've never heard of this and can't wait to try it. Do you use a 6'6" rod with it or doesn't it matter. Also, does braided work better than mono or are they equivalent?
 

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Jeffrey, I use braid on all of mine but Mono can be used. And about any rod will work. I get a wild hair once in a while and bought three 9 ft carp rods, European style. But that is just me. You can use about any rod since the reel is basically in free spoon.

Remember carp have a soft mouth so don't set a hook hard when they run with the bait. I just turn the crank to engage the spool, pick the rod up and start bring the fish in. You will develop your own method very quickly.

The hardest thing to remember when you start using these reels it to flip the lever at the rear of the reel. Mine are pretty safe since I almost always fish from my boat which has good rod holders so the rod will stay in place.

tight lines
 
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